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Hygge this winter with RRC Library

December 17, 2020

What is Hygge?

Hygge. Pronounced “Hue-gah.” (n.) Danish. A mood of coziness and comfort with feelings of wellness and contentment.

Hygge is also the topic of a new series coming to RRC Library’s social media channels. Each week, we will feature online resources to help you rest, relax, and refocus this winter season. This collection is entirely online, available 24/7, and the link to each resource is provided below.

Follow us!

To learn about other fun series as well as service and programming updates, follow us! Click on the icons below to visit our pages.

 

 

 

Hygge with RRC Library Collection

50 ways to soothe yourself without food

A collection of mindfulness skills and practices for relaxing the body in times of stress and ending your dependence on eating as a means of coping with difficult emotions.

In this book we will explain why downtime is inadequate for helping us recharge our batteries, and present you with an effective alternative.

Brilliant book of calm: down to earth ideas for finding inner peace in a chaotic world

The brilliant book of calm will help you find and maintain a balanced perspective on life, so that you can deal with anything.

Drawing calm: relax, refresh, refocus with 20 drawing, painting, and collage workshops inspired by Klimt, Klee, Monet, and more

Drawing Calm teaches artists and non-artists how to find an oasis of calm every day by using the work of master painters to inspire creativity.


Dream design live

With stunning photography and accessible-yet-elegant tips, Dream Design Live fuses interior decorating advice with lifestyle recommendations and demonstrates how living a happy and satisfying life starts at home.

Gifts of imperfection: let go of who you think you’re supposed to be and embrace who you are

An engaging exploration of how we can cultivate the courage, compassion, and connection to wake up in the morning and think, No matter what gets done and how much is left undone, I am enough, and to go to bed at night thinking, Yes, I am sometimes afraid, but I am also brave. And, yes, I am imperfect and vulnerable, but that doesn’t change the truth that I am worthy of love and belonging.

Happiness: the science behind your smile

This is the first book to comprehensively address the most basic of human desires. Everybody wants it. But what exactly is happiness?

Little ways to keep calm and carry on: twenty lessons for managing worry, anxiety, and fear

A psychologist, psychiatry professor, and anxiety researcher present twenty simple lessons that readers can use to relieve everyday anxiety on the spot and to develop resilience.


Make yourself cozy

Freshly baked bread. Cloud-like pillows. Lavender tea. Katie Vaz’s book on self-care shows readers how slow, cozy warmth can help them deal with the anxieties and challenges of everyday life.

Mindful learning: reduce stress and improve brain performance for effective learning

Practical insights and exercises on how to apply mindfulness in the educational setting, this book clearly sets out how we can manage stress, improve performance and create better communication and relationships.

Mindfulness for students

Through insightful ideas and personal anecdotes, this book will introduce you to the many benefits and applications of mindfulness – from mindful breathing, eating, exercising, sleeping, studying and communicating.

One pot comfort: make everyday meals in one pot, pan or appliance

An inspiring collection of everyday recipes for favorite comfort foods made in one pot, pan, or appliance.


Open house : reinventing space for simple living

A sweeping behind-the-scenes perspective on home transformations, written in a personal, intimate style, with humor and honesty.

Recover from burnout: life lessons to regain your passion and purpose

Discover how to understand your burnout, recognize and engage with the underlying fears and beliefs that underpin your drive to push your body, mind and spirit to breaking point, change the beliefs and habits that have exhausted you, regain your energy and enthusiasm, and avoid falling back into the burnout traps.

Relax and enjoy life: 149 ultimate stress busters

149 stress-proofing ideas which are short and practical but can help you live the life you want to live …now.

Yes lives in the land of no: a tale of triumph over negativity

A how-to manual that’s both practical and entertaining. It will help you find the YESes you seek–faster, more effectively, and with a lot less discouragement and despair in the process.


We’d love to hear from you!

Written by Linda Fox, Library Services

Moving online: Behind the scenes at RRC Library

December 11, 2020

Guest post: Written by James Spencer, RRC Library and Information Technology student

2020: A year of transition for students and faculty alike

This year has been truly the likes of which none of us have ever seen before. It has been quite an adjustment for both RRC students and staff alike transitioning to this world of social distancing and online learning. As a faculty that serves both RRC staff and students, the RRC Library had to adapt on the fly as well.

As a Library and Information Technology program student at the Exchange District Campus, I was fortunate enough to spend two weeks with the RRC Library staff at the Notre Dame Campus for my work experience practicum. The experience was truly eye-opening, it has given me a unique perspective on how the RRC Library has adapted during this time of the global pandemic. Although we may not be able to see it in person like in the past, there is a lot of hard work going on behind the scenes at the RRC Library to make this transition as smooth as possible for the entire RRC family.

Cloud-based Library system made for an easy pivot to online

The cloud-based system ALMA, used by the RRC Library staff, has allowed for a quick pivot back to a relatively normal online library experience for RRC students. If library records and accounts were housed internally on the RRC computer system as they were prior to ALMA, there would be a noticeable backlog resulting in poor service for RRC patrons. It is this interconnectivity provided by ALMA amongst the numerous RRC Library services that has helped to maintain regularity for RRC students and staff during these uncertain times.

Although most RRC students might be unfamiliar ALMA, whenever we use the OneSearch database on the RRC Library website, we are using Primo, the sister system to ALMA. It is ALMA that connects RRC OneSearch users to several databases such as EBSCOhost, Academic Search Complete, and CINAHL to name a few. These databases provide RRC students the essential journal articles that are needed for their studies.

Chat service allows staff to provide assistance to users while they’re at home

Another essential for RRC Library users is a live chat service. You may have noticed this little chatbot as you first enter the RRC Library website. I know what you’re thinking, is this a robot? Sorry to burst your bubble but it is a dedicated RRC Library staff member ready to help RRC students with their reference needs. Due to the restrictions of the pandemic, this service is more valuable than ever before. Thanks to this service, RRC students can stay safe at home and have their reference needs satisfied all the while.

Although we may remain socially distant for the time being, if we remain open to adapting and interacting with each other just like ALMA and the numerous RRC Library services it provides, we can all get through these times and be better as an RRC family when we do return to normalcy.

Visit the Library – Online!

To view the complete range of supports available from the Library and Academic Success Centre, visit our websites!

LIBRARYPerson working at a laptop with books at the side. text: RRC Library: Guiding You Through A World of Information.

ACADEMIC SUCCESS CENTREFemale students with a big smile. Text: Academic Success Centre


This academic year finds us in quite a different world; however, our commitment to providing you with the supports and services you need to succeed at RRC remains unchanged. As we continue this year together, the Academic Success Centre & Library are here for you.

Coming Soon! Live Sessions From Library Lunch and Learn

December 4, 2020

Library Lunch and Learn has evolved and expanded yet again. From its beginnings as a lunchtime session in the NDC Library classroom, it transitioned to pre-recorded mini-lectures on demand. We are pleased to announce that, beginning in January 2021, we will be adding live sessions to the mix. These webinars will provide an interactive learning environment with opportunities to ask questions and dig deeper into the learning process.

New Website Ties It All Together

Library Lunch and Learn has a new location on the web. Here you may:

  • View the upcoming schedule
  • Register for a webinar
  • Access related handouts and guides
  • Watch Lunch and Learn on demand

What is Library Lunch and Learn?

A series of mini-lectures demonstrating the ins and outs of Library tools, databases, and research methods in a short, upbeat lunchtime session.

Have a question?

During the Library’s regular hours, a friendly staff member is available to chat with you online. Just click on the Ask Us bubble at library.rrc.ca.


This academic year finds us however, our commitment to providing you with the supports and services you need to succeed at RRC remains unchanged. As we continue this year together, the Academic Success Centre & Library are here for you.

GUIDE SPOTLIGHT SERIES | Oncology Nursing Guide: A Collaboration

November 30, 2020

Collaboration resulted in a tailor-made guide

In this special edition of Guide Spotlight, we celebrate the collaboration between a Library staff member and an instructor from RRC’s Nursing Department. The Oncology Nursing guide began as a conversation and resulted in a tailor-made guide which “contains up-to-date and comprehensive Oncology resources and allows students enrolled in [the] 3rd-year Oncology Nursing elective to engage in meaningful research that will be individually tailored to their learning needs. Access to these up-to-date resources will also benefit our students as they prepare to enter practice in our health care settings across the province.” (Joanne Loughery, Nursing Instructor)

Special thanks to Rosemary for the support and valuable research expertise she provides to our nursing students as we prepare them for excellence in nursing practice in complex health care settings.

What is a guide?

Library Guides pull together a range of resources on a given topic. These include materials from the Library’s collection such as books, videos, and articles as well as online sources such as webpages, YouTube videos, and online reports. Guides house all of this information in one place, simplifying access and providing a single link you can place on your LEARN site. One of the great aspects of guides is their flexibility – they can be updated, adapted, and transformed at any time.

What is the process?

Rosemary Woodby describes the process of collaborating on a guide as “flexible, but typically starts with a discussion about what is needed for the class – what type of resources and topics will this guide focus on? I then ask for recommendations – are there webpages, videos, books, or articles that an instructor recommends to their students? I combine those recommendations with items from the Library into a guide format using our LibGuide software platform and when we are all happy with the result the guide is published and made available to students and the college community.”

I can build these myself but when developed in collaboration with faculty they are so much richer; and create a strong resource that is tailored to the needs of the students. (Rosemary Woodby, Library Services)

Interested in collaborating on a subject guide?

If you are interested in working with a Library staff member on the creation of a guide, please contact the Library by emailing library@rrc.ca or click on the Ask Us bubble at library.rrc.ca.

Visit the Guides


This academic year finds us in quite a different world; however, our commitment to providing you with the supports and services you need to succeed at RRC remains unchanged. As we continue this year together, the Academic Success Centre & Library are here for you.

Identifying credible information

November 24, 2020

Written by Bren Johnstone, RRC Library & Information Technology student

Person reading news on an electronic device.

Photo by Kaboompics.com from Pexels

Don’t get sucked in by fake news

You probably already know not to trust everything you read on the internet – but how comfortable are you really when it comes to checking the facts? In a world of constant updates, influencers, and increasing global awareness, it can be hard to keep track of what’s real and what’s a sensationalized story for internet fame. Use these resources to help build up your information literacy skills so you can spot the difference and avoid the trap of fake news.

What is media literacy anyway?

If literacy is the ability to make meaning out of words, then media literacy is the ability to think critically about that meaning. What is the goal behind it – selling something, convincing you to do something? Who is telling us, and what makes them a credible source or not? When did this happen? All of these questions can have an impact on how we understand what we’re being told.

One way to remember this process is the CRAAP test, originally developed by the California State University:Diagram indicating the steps in the CRAAP test: Currency, Relevancy, Authority, Accuracy, Purpose

  • Currency – how recent is the information? How time-sensitive is it?
  • Relevance – is this information appropriate? Who is it meant for?
  • Authority – who is the source? What credentials do they have for this claim?
  • Accuracy – can this be verified by other sources? Is it everything, or just partial information?
  • Purpose – what’s the goal? Is this fact or opinion?

Resources

To get you thinking about media literacy, this article by Maribeth D. Smith, “Arming students against bad information,” outlines the CRAAP test in more detail as well as highlighting the dangers of buying into misinformation.

If you want to get right into the practical skills, here are two video tutorial series to get you started:

  • This video series by Crash Course and MediaWise is a good place to start identifying media literacy skills, like lateral-reading and evaluating evidence.
  • LinkedIn Learning has a whole course plan available on developing information literacy skills for academic research, including how to evaluate different types of sources and how to search effectively.

And if you learn best by example, the Infodemic blog is a great place to explore. The blog is run by Mike Caulfield who is a digital literacy expert and uses Covid-19 information as a guidebook to demonstrate essential fact-checking skills.

Looking for more resources?

Check out the library guide for more sources on how to evaluate websites and online resources here. Or contact the library staff by email at library@rrc.ca or by visiting library.rrc.ca and click on the Ask Us button. In addition, the Library’s broad selection of online books, videos, and journals may be accessed 24/7 through OneSearch​ (RRC log in may be required).


This academic year finds us in quite a different world; however, our commitment to providing you with the supports and services you need to succeed at RRC remains unchanged. As we continue this year together, the Academic Success Centre & Library are here for you.

Free Supports From Your Library and Academic Success Team!

October 22, 2020

A special message from Library Services

This new academic year finds us in quite a different world, however, our commitment to providing you with the supports and services needed to succeed at RRC remains unchanged; in fact, it has grown stronger. We have expanded our online services, and also provide some onsite supports as requested, which means we are able to meet you where and when you need us. As we continue this fall term together, we are here for you.

Online supports

Our virtual services and support are available to you for free five days a week during the following hours:

Monday – Thursday
7:45 am – 5:00 pm

Friday
7:45 am – 4:30 pm

See below for an overview of what we offer and how to access our services.

Academic Success Centre

Female students with a big smile. Text: Academic Success CentreThe Academic Success Centre offers an array of academic supports and services online, by e-mail or phone – visit their website and connect with them! They have a dedicated group of tutors and specialists ready to support you in your course work. To request tutoring, academic coaching, EAL supports, or academic writing support, students can complete the Tutoring and Coaching Request Form.

RRC Library

Person working at a laptop with books at the side. text: RRC Library: Guiding You Through A World of Information.The Library’s online services remain as robust as ever, with continual improvements in programming and content. In addition to guides and mini-lectures on demand, the Library’s online collection is available 24/7 through OneSearch. We help students with research and database navigation through various online options such as chat, email and Teams. To ask a question or connect with a Library staff member, visit library.rrc.ca and click on the Ask Us bubble.

Or connect with us in-person

On Mondays and Wednesdays, the NDC Library is open 7:45 am – 5:00 pm. Come by for a quiet place to focus on your work (free wi-fi included) and in-person assistance from a Library staff member.

Onsite tutoring and EAL supports are available by appointment at NDC on Mondays and Wednesdays (daytime) and at EDC on Fridays (daytime). To book an appointment, students can complete the Tutoring and Coaching Request Form.

Open Access Week October 19 – 23

October 9, 2020

Open access logo appears as open lock

 

Image: Rafabollas / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)

Open Access (OA) week 2020 will be hosted internationally October 19 – 25. Open access is a set of principles and a range of practices through which research outputs are distributed online, free of cost or other access barriers. With open access strictly defined, barriers to copying or reuse are also reduced or removed by applying an open license for copyright. We see the principles of OA in Open Education. [i]

Event:

OER logoIf you want to learn more about Open Access and the use of Open Educational Resources (OER) be sure to register for the Red River College Open Access Week Event here: Open Educational Resources (OER) adoption and adaptation Session  – Oct. 20, Noon – 1PM  hosted by the Red River College Copyright Officer in partnership with Campus Manitoba.

 

 

In the Spirit of OA week let’s ask ourselves some complicated questions:

 

Image of bookWhy should Open Access Matter to Educators?

Sun Yang associate professor of China University of Political Science and Law stated “It is naturally accepted that teachers should have the authority to determine the specific use of their course materials by third parties, including their students. Without their permission, no one should copy, distribute, delete or modify the copyrighted course content. In an offline environment, copyright is controlled through physical copies which are purchased. This becomes a challenge in online classrooms.”[ii]

While the original goal of the Open Educational Resource (OER) initiatives was to make higher education more accessible by reducing students costs through the use of openly licensed textbooks these resources now serve educators in the wake of a pandemic as valuable and adaptable tools for the online classroom. OER supports Open Access principles by freely allowing modifications, adaptations, and format transitions without the need to seek costly or time consuming copyright permissions for modification to fit online institutional environments, platforms and classrooms.

The restrictive licensing agreements and terms of copyright applied to many digital textbooks and supplementary materials from publishers make it difficult to adapt materials in new ways to engage students in online learning environments. Materials can further have restrictive licensing agreements that make it confusing to establish when the material can be used in conjunction with a Learning Management System (LMS/LEARN). OER’s have become powerful tools in aiding educators in the adaptability they need to function in continually changing teaching environments that can move from the classroom in person, to digital online learning with little notice and their access to the physical resources of their institutional libraries continues to be limited or completely cut off.

 

Image of grad capWhy Should Open Access Matter to Students?

UNESCO stated that, “…as of 17 May 2020, almost 1.21 billion learners were affected (by the global pandemic), accounting for 69.3% of the world’s student population. The global education community continues to face the major challenge of providing interactive and motivating educational experience during school and university closure. In this special situation, Open Educational Resources (OER) have never been so urgently and broadly needed like today.”[iii]

OER’s can involve students directly in the adaption and building of the learning materials they engage with. They allow students to contribute to online education which can be built upon by others around the globe and allow classes and instructors to source global perspectives to incorporate into College programs. These skills as well as the experience of involvement in the creation of resources for teaching and instruction ensure the student experience is intellectually rigorous, experiential and robust. Student involvement in OER development and adaptation can upon graduation stand as a real world example of experience and skills gained by the student in their education. This can be helpful in providing prospective employers meaningful examples of not only the skills they have acquired but “what” they have accomplished during their studies, in contributing to educational resources that can be used by other educational institutions around the globe.

OER’s and Open Access resources also reduce the cost textbooks and supplementary materials to students as these resources are free and openly available alternatives to traditional textbooks and supplementary material.

 

image of globeWhat is the Role of Open Access in a post pandemic society?

UNESCO (2020) has recently launched a call stating that “the Covid-19 crisis has resulted in a paradigm shift on how learners of all ages, worldwide, can access learning. It is therefore more than ever essential that the global community comes together now to foster universal access to information and knowledge through OER.” [iv] Open Access to information is the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research, and the right to use and re-use those results as you need. Open Access  has the power to transform the way research and scientific inquiry are conducted. It has direct and widespread implications for academia, medicine, science, industry, and for society as a whole.

 

For more on the importance of OA check out this video from PHD Comics.

Sources:

[i] ‘International Open Access week, about page’ Accessed September 30, 2020 http://www.openaccessweek.org/page/about

[ii] Yang, S. (2020). ‘As teaching shifts online during the epidemic, it faces copyright issues.’ Accessed September 30, 2020 https://news.cgtn.com/news/2020-02-20/Copyright-concerns-as-teaching-shifts-online-during-epidemic-OejyJkh3xu/index.html

[iii] & [iv]  UNESCO (2020) ‘Guidance on Open Educational Practices during School Closures: Utilizing OER under COVID-19 Pandemic in line with UNESCO OER Recommendation’ Accessed September 30, 2020 https://iite.unesco.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Guidance-on-Open-Educational-Practices-during-School-Closures-English-Version-V1_0.pdf

 

Library Lunch and Learn – October/November Edition

October 1, 2020

Join Us For Lunch and Learn a New Skill!

Laptop displaying Library Lunch and Learn logo on the screen. Text says, "Library Lunch and Learn Video Version"The world of information is increasingly vast and also tainted by a great deal of misinformation. Library Lunch and Learn is a series of mini-lectures designed to teach you the specifics of finding and evaluating information. We also demonstrate the ins and outs of individual databases, which offer a wealth of information catered to your area of expertise.

October/November 2020 Schedule

Below is the October/November schedule of popular Library Lunch and Learn topics. For the complete list of available Lunch and Learn videos, visit the Library Lunch and Learn page, which is updated weekly.

Monday, October 5
The New PubMed – Nursing Database

Nursing student. Lunch and Learn logo. Text: The New PubMed - Nursing Database

PubMed is an open-access database, created by the National Library of Medicine, that contains more than 30 million citations and abstracts of peer-reviewed biomedical literature. PubMed is used by researchers the world over.

Wednesday, October 7
Business Source Complete – Business Database

Business Student. Lunch and Learn logo. text: Business Source Complete - Business Database.

This essential database for business students contains tens of thousands of full-text journal and magazine articles as well as newspaper items and e-books. Find current news stories, case studies, industry reports, market research reports, company profiles, SWOT analyses, and more greatly enhance your understanding of the world of business.

Wednesday, October 14
Knovel – Engineering Database

Student on construction site. Lunch and Learn logo. Text: Knovel - Engineering Database.

Knovel is more than a database of e-books covering a variety of engineering subject areas. This unique database also features interactive tools including Properties Materials Search; Interactive Equations, the browser-based calculation software – Equation Solver, detailed Unit Converter, Steam Calculators, Interactive Periodical Table, and the ability to create and share folders of your saved results and work.

Monday, October 19
Nursing Reference Centre – Nursing Database

Nursing student. Lunch and Learn logo. Text: Nursing Reference Centre - Nursing Database.

Designed specifically for nurses, this resource provides evidence-based information for point of care, continuing education, drug databases, nursing research, and more.

Wednesday, October 21
How Not to Drown in Information

A person looking up information on a tablet. Lunch and Learn logo. text: How not to drown in information

Forget information overload, we often feel like drowning in information with nobody throwing us a lifeline to shore. From CRAAP to RADAR, pick up some quick tips to evaluate information while researching for an assignment and learn how Google/Wikipedia can work with library resources not against.

Monday, October 26
RxTx – Pharmaceutical and Therapeutic Database

Person in lab coat looking into a microscope. Lunch and Learn logo. text: RxTx - Pharmaceutical and therapeutic database.

RxTx is Canada’s authoritative source for prescribing and managing drug therapy, providing online access to evidence-based, reliable Canadian drug, and therapeutic information. In this session, we will explore the multiple facets of the Canadian Pharmaceutical Association’s RxTx database.

Wednesday, October 28
IBISWorld – Business Database

Business student having a conversation. Lunch and Learn logo.Text: IBISWorld - Business Database.

For Business students and anyone researching industry information, IBISWorld is a go-to database. It provides access to Canadian and US industry reports containing trends, market information, industry statistics, competitive landscape, and other industry-related information.

Monday, November 2
Making the Most of LinkedIn Learning

Man in suit making thumbs up signal. Lunch and learn logo. text: Making the Most of LinkedIn Learning.

The LinkedIn Learning videos, formerly known as Lynda.com, have found their way into course work and even our Library guides. This session provides a refresher on what it is and how to navigate the various parts of a LinkedIn Learning Course to take advantage of this powerful tool for learning.

Wednesday, November 4
MarketLine – Business Database

Person pointing a pen at a sheet with graphs and statistics on it. Library Lunch and Learn logo. Text: MarketLine - Business Database.

Business and Marketing students need to locate quality business information. Be sure to familiarize yourself with Marketline to access 50,000 industry, company, and country profiles. Profiles offer standardized market data, competitive analysis, and other insights into business organization and function. You will also find socio and macroeconomic insights.

Have a question?

Ask Us button for Library chatDuring the Library’s regular hours, a friendly staff member is available to chat with you online. Just click on the Ask Us bubble at library.rrc.ca.


Whether you’re at home or on campus, Library Services is here to support you and help you reach your goals.

Cinematic Journeys Through Truth and Reconciliation Week

September 28, 2020

In honour of Truth and Reconciliation Week (Sep 28 – Oct 2, 2020), RRC Library has compiled three “cinematic journeys” that address topics central to this annual event. The first two collections (“cinemas”) portray residential school experiences and stories of violence against Indigenous women — serious and sensitive topics that may disturb some viewers. The third cinema is a tribute to Indigenous women, revealing the strength, honour, and respect they bring to families and society as a whole. Through real-life stories and perspectives, these films are intended to encourage understanding and participation in the healing process of Truth and Reconciliation.

Explore Further

We encourage you to explore beyond these films by visiting the Truth and Reconciliation webpage developed by RRC’s School of Indigenous Education. Also of interest are the Library’s Indigenous Education Guides and the National Film Board’s listing of Indigenous Cinema.

Cinema 1: Residential Schools

Young Indigenous girl getting her hair cut upon arrival to the residential school. Film title: we were children

We Were Children (2012, 1 h 23 min) The profound impact of the Canadian government’s residential school system is conveyed through the eyes of two children who were forced to face hardships beyond their years. We Were Children gives voice to a national tragedy and demonstrates the incredible resilience of the human spirit.

Image of girl balancing a book on her head. Film title: Holy angels

Holy Angels (2017, 13 min) A powerful portrayal of Canada’s colonialist history using impressionistic images and the fragmented language of a child. Filmed with a fierce determination to not only uncover history but move past it, Holy Angels speaks of the resilience of a people who have found ways of healing—and of coming home again.

Three people sitting on the deck beside a still lake. Film title: Stories are in our bones

Stories are in Our Bones (2019, 11 min) Filmmaker Janine Windolph takes her young sons fishing with their kokum (grandmother), a residential school survivor who retains a deep knowledge and memory of the land. Reconnecting with their homeland is a cultural and familial healing journey for the boys, who are growing up in the city. It’s also a powerful form of resistance for the women.

Indigenous woman with glasses, speaking. Film title: Second stories: it had to be done.

Second Stories – It Had to Be Done (2008, 22 min) Explores the legacy of residential schools through the eyes of two extraordinary women who not only lived it, but who, as adults, made the surprising decision to return to the school that had affected their lives so profoundly. This intimate and moving film affirms their strength and dignity in standing up and making a difference on their own terms.

Cartoon image of a boy in the cold. Film title: The secret path

The secret path (2016, 1 h) This powerful animated film tells the story of Chanie Wenjack, a 12-year-old Ojibwa boy who died of exposure in 1966 while running away from Cecilia Jeffrey Indian Residential School near Kenora, Ontario.

Cinema 2: Violence Against Indigenous Women (MMIWG)

Image of an Indigenous girl. Film title: Finding Dawn

Finding Dawn (2006, 1 h 13 min) Acclaimed Métis filmmaker Christine Welsh brings us a compelling documentary that puts a human face on a national tragedy – the epidemic of missing or murdered Indigenous women in Canada.

Women participating in an awareness march. Film title: Stolen sisters

Stolen Sisters (2007, 43 min) Stolen Sisters takes viewers inside this contentious issue, from the rolling farmland of Saskatchewan to the haunting depths of the dark alleys in Vancouver’s dangerous Hastings district. You will hear the stories of the missing and witness one family’s desperate search for their loved one.

Cinema 3: Honouring Indigenous Women

Sewing together leaves. Film title: Mother of many children

Mother of Many Children (1977, 57 min) Alanis Obomsawin honours the central place of women and mothers within Indigenous cultures. An album of Indigenous womanhood, the film portrays proud matriarchal cultures that for centuries have been pressured to adopt the standards and customs of the dominant society.

Young Indigenous girl participating in drumming group. Film title: Our dear sisters

Our Dear Sisters (1975, 14 min) Alanis Obomsawin, a North American Indian who earns her living by singing and making films, is the mother of an adopted child. She talks about her life, her people, and her responsibilities as a single parent. Her observations shake some of our cultural assumptions.

Indigenous woman with parka on. Film title: Martha of the North

Martha of the North (2008, 1 h 23 min) In the mid-1950s, lured by false promises of a better life, Inuit families were displaced by the Canadian government and left to their own devices in the Far North. In this icy desert realm, Martha Flaherty and her family lived through one of Canadian history’s most sombre and little-known episodes.

Indigenous girl dressed in dancing attire. Film title: This is who I am

This Is Who I Am (2018, 11 min) A young First Nations woman struggles with her identity in the big city. After a series of events, she realizes she can still be Anishinaabe, and in fact, it is her responsibility.

Have a question?

During the Library’s regular hours, a friendly staff member is available to chat with you online. Just click on the Ask Us bubble at Ask Us bubble - click to chat with Library stafflibrary.rrc.ca.


Whether you’re at home or on campus, Library Services is here to support you and help you reach your goals.

Library Lunch and Learn – September Edition

September 3, 2020

Library Lunch and Learn is Now Online

We have scheduled two videos per week of our popular Lunch and Learn topics. Links to these videos are available on the Library Lunch and Learn page. Each session will feature one topic to help you become efficient at finding and accessing quality information.

September Schedule

Here is the line-up of Lunch and Learn videos for the month of September:

Wed, Sep 9

OneSearch (new and improved)

Mon, Sep 14

Research Skills

Wed, Sep 16

RefWorks – Reference Management

Mon, Sep 21

UpToDate: Point-of-Care Clinical Database

Wed, Sep 23

Peer-Review

Mon, Sep 28

Advanced CINAHL (Nursing Database)

Wed, Sep 30

Crediting Ideas: Resources to Help Avoid Plagiarism

Want to See the Full Schedule?

To view the complete Lunch and Learn fall schedule, visit the Library Lunch and Learn page. Please note: this schedule is subject to change — always check the Events Calendar for current sessions.

Have a question? Ask Us!

Ask Us button for Library chatTo ask a question through our online service desk, simply visit library.rrc.ca and click on the Ask Us button.