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Happy Open Education Week!

February 26, 2021

Open education is a philosophy about the way people should produce, share, and build on knowledge. “Open educational resources (OERs) provide a model for convenient, cost-effective access [to resources] with no copyright barriers to worry about, expensive texts to purchase, or restrictions on adaptation, customization or re-use.”[i]

Open Education Week seeks to raise awareness and highlight open education efforts worldwide. OE Week provides practitioners, educators and students an opportunity to gain a greater understanding of open educational practices and be inspired by the wonderful work being developed by the community around the world. [ii]

The 2020-2021 year presented unprecedented challenges in the world. One of these challenges met by educators was the sudden shift to online learning. Red River College kicked off discussion and supports for Faulty using OER (Open Educational Resources) in May 2020 spearheaded by the new Copyright officer in partnership with Campus MB. Over one hundred faculty and staff attended this session, and two additional sessions on OER were hosted during the 2020 year.

One simple adoption of an open textbook at RRC during the 2020-2021 year served 840 students, saving each student $159.95 in textbook costs for a total saving to students of $134,358. This the impact of just one title, over the years RRC has seen over 8 open textbook adoptions.

OER’s have also provided instructors at RRC with additional resources to work with and adapt in a time when access to physical resources has been limited. The Open Education philosophy proves to be a great asset in the push for online learning environments prompted by the pandemic,  but OER’s themselves have been around since the early 2000’s.

If you would like to view our past 2020 OER session it was recorded and is available to be viewed at your convenience:

 

OER’s are resources published under an open license, such as Creative Commons, these resources can be freely adapted to help your students meet the learning outcomes for your course. At RRC our main focus in the 2020 year has been around the use of Open Textbooks but many different OER’s exist as vast as the types of educational content. If you feel like you missed the boat and are just hearing about OER, let me assure you that isn’t the case. The RRC library offers an OER Landing Page to start you out on your Open Education journey.

If you are already familiar with OER and would like to take this week to get up to speed conversations educators are having regarding Open Education during the pandemic Law Bytes has a prerecorded podcast discussing the significant new challenges for teachers and students in adapting course materials to the online learning environment. Be sure to check it out!

Episode 45: David Porter on the Benefits of Open Educational Resources as Millions Shift to Online Learning

 

 

As we celebrate Open Education Week for the 2021 year, I challenge instructors to ask themselves:

What can Open Education do to support your online instruction?

How can Open Education serve your students?

If you are seeking OER assistance or support get in touch with the RRC Copyright Officer.

Happy Open Education Week!

                                                                                                                         

[i] Michael Geist, “David Porter on the Benefits of Open Educational Resources as Millions Shift to Online Learning,” Law Bytes Podcast, March 30, 2020, https://www.michaelgeist.ca/podcast/episode-45-david-porter-on-the-benefits-of-open-educational-resources-as-millions-of-canadians-shift-to-online-learning/.

[ii] Open Education Week. Open Education Global, n.d. https://www.openeducationweek.org/page/what-is-open-education-week.

 

 

Copyright is Complicated, Your Library Can Help!

February 19, 2021

Red River College takes the protection of Intellectual Property rights seriously. The College and its staff and students are expected to take reasonable steps to ensure that materials protected by copyright are used in accordance with the law by following our Fair Dealing Policy. Copyright is complicated but interacting with Copyright materials is often a daily part of our lives. At work, during our education and in our leisure time, we are often engaging with copyright materials. Fair Dealing is an important part of how we as educators and students ensure we are using Copyrighted content with respect to the rights of the individuals that create the content, and in in accordance with the law.

Could you imagine if there was no legal way to use Copyright material without permission from the owner of that content? How would this affect your work, education and hobbies?

Our ability to use Copyright content when we don’t secure permission is limited, Fair Dealing is a provision in the Copyright Act that permits use of a copyright-protected work without permission from the copyright owner or the payment of copyright royalties in limited circumstances. Fair dealing exists as a user right within the Copyright Act for the public good to foster education, creativity, and innovation.

The doctrine of Fair Dealing guides our use of Copyright material under the Copyright Act of Canada, but how do we use materials in accordance with Fair Dealing? Here at the RRC library we have some helpful tools to point you in the right direction. If you are trying to make a decision around using copyright material we have a Fair Dealing tool to support you. This tool will walk you through a series of questions around your use of copyright content to ensure your use is in line with our policy, and the tool will direct you to the Copyright Officer when you are in need of assistance.

Want information about how to use our Fair Dealing tool, and how you can use Copyright material under Fair Dealing?

Register For our Fair Dealing Week Session

Date: Thursday, February 25, 2021
Time: 11am-12 noon

Register for Fair Dealing week Events Across Canada Here

Date:  February 22 – 26, 2021

Fair Dealing Week is a time to highlight and promote the opportunities presented by the Fair Dealing provision of the Copyright act, celebrate successful stories, and explain this user right under the Copyright Act. How do students engage with, and rely on fair dealing? Check out this Fair Dealing Testimonial from Shifrah Gadamsetti Sociology Student and President of the Students’ Association Mount Royal University.

Educators also interact with copyright on a daily basis. “Fair dealing is critical for innovative teaching and learning on campuses across Canada. It helps our instructors bring dynamic and relevant content to their courses…” read more about how fair dealing impacts educators in the following testimonial from Leslie Reid Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning) and Teaching Professor, Faculty of Science University of Calgary.

RRC policy is available to guide our actions when using Copyright material, our Library Team and Copyright Officer are here to assist Instructors and Students in interpreting this policy. If you have questions about Copyright or Fair Dealing be sure to visit the Copyright Page on the RRC library site and reach out the Copyright Officer for assistance.

Happy Fair Dealing Week!

 

Save the Date – Long Night Against Procrastination

February 17, 2021

Coming April 7, 2021: Long Night Against Procrastination

The Long Night Against Procrastination, offered by the Library and Academic Success Centre, is an event providing academic and moral support to RRC students as they finish assignments and prepare for exams. Students may choose from a variety of help desks, workshops, and wellness events depending on their needs. This year, the event will be going online (website location and registration information TBA).

The event is free to all RRC students.

Details

What?

Long Night Against Procrastination

Where?

Online (web location TBA)

When?

April 7, 2021, 5-8 pm

Why?

For support and assignment help when you need it most

Who?

All RRC students

Highlights from Last Year’s Event

The first Long Night Against Procrastination was held at the NDC Library on Feb 6, 2020. Moving online will make it look and feel different this year, but our commitment to helping you succeed at RRC will always remain the same.

View highlights of last year’s event >> Long Night Against Procrastination – Feb 2020

Have questions? Please contact Bettina Allen, Library Services.

Black History Video Collection

February 8, 2021

Written by Linda Fox, Library Services

February is Black History Month, a time to celebrate the achievements and contributions of Black Canadians through history. They have helped make Canada the culturally diverse, compassionate and prosperous nation it is today. This special compilation of streaming videos and other resources is available to the College community courtesy of RRC Library (RRC log in may be required).

Book of Negroes

Book of Negroes cover art

Based on the award-winning novel by Lawrence Hill, The Book of Negroes depicts the extraordinary life journey of Aminata Diallo, an indomitable African woman who cuts a swath through a world that is predisposed to underestimate her. Kidnapped by slave traders in West Africa and subsequently enslaved in South Carolina, Aminata must navigate her way through the American Revolution in New York, the isolated refuge given to Black Loyalists in Nova Scotia and the treacherous jungles of Sierra Leone, before ultimately securing her freedom in England at the dawn of the 19th century.

Side Note: What is The Book of Negroes?

“[The] Book of Negroes was the first massive public record of blacks in North America. Indeed, what makes the Book of Negroes so fascinating are the stories of where its people came from and how it came to be that they fled to Nova Scotia and other British colonies. (Source: Canada’s History – Behind the Book of Negroes)

View more around the history of the Book of Negroes by visiting Canada’s Digital Collections, Black Loyalists: Our History, Our People, by Library and Archives Canada.

Deeply Rooted

Deeply Rooted cover art

Filmmaker Cazhhmere is a seventh-generation black Canadian. Despite this deep history, she’s constantly asked to explain where she’s from — even though the answer is always “Canada.” Cazhhmere is a proud Canadian. Her ancestors were among the first black settlers to come to Canada — her family has spent hundreds of years weaving itself into the fabric of our nation. Despite this deep history, Cazhhmere is constantly questioned about where she is originally from. In Deeply Rooted, Cazhhmere will change your perception of what a multi-generational Canadian family looks like. In a country that is widely known for being a “global melting pot,” our nation can easily forget that not every person of colour is a newcomer to Canada.

Invisible City 

Invisible city cover art

The film is set in the inner-city housing project of Toronto’s Regent Park; Kendell and Mikey, like their surroundings are in the process of transformation; the environment and social pressures tempting them to make poor choices, their mothers and mentors rooting for them to succeed. Turning his camera on the often-ignored inner city, Academy-award nominated director Hubert Davis sensitively depicts the disconnection of urban poverty and race from the mainstream.

Hardwood

Hardwood cover art

Hardwood is a personal journey by director Hubert Davis, the son of former Harlem Globetrotter Mel Davis, who explores how his father’s decisions affected his life and those of his extended family. Elegantly structured into three chapters entitled “love,” “recollection” and “redemption,” Davis uses personal interviews, archival footage and home movies to delve into his father’s past in the hope of finding a new direction for his own.

Mighty Jerome

Mighty Jerome cover art

In 1959, at just 19, Harry Jerome was Canada’s most promising track and field star on his way to the Olympics in Rome. By 1962, after suffering a gruesome leg injury, there was every reason to think that his racing days were over. But Jerome was not just a champion on the track; he was doubly determined off it. And so began his climb to what his coach, Bill Bowerman, called “the greatest comeback in track and field history.”

The Skin We’re In

Skin we're in cover art

Urgent, controversial and undeniably honest, The Skin We’re In is a wake-up call to complacent Canadians. Racism is here. It is everywhere. It is us and we are it. Following celebrated journalist Desmond Cole as he researches his hotly anticipated book, this documentary from acclaimed director Charles Officer pulls back the curtain on racism in Canada.

Explore Black History on the Web

If you ever have the time and interest in exploring Black history, there are many websites worth checking out. Here you will find a combination of historical images and true stories that bring Black history and culture to life.

Various websites

Canadian Museum for Human Rights Stories

Video Collections from Curio.ca and NFB

Browse the Library’s e-book collection

Browse the e-book collection: Black History

Have a question or suggestion? Connect with us!

To connect with us through our online service desk, simply visit library.rrc.ca and click on the Ask Us button. We’d love to hear from you!

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For everything from fun series to service and programming updates, follow us on social media. We’re active on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

 

Library Lunch and Learn – January 2021 edition

December 23, 2020

Join us for LUNCH and LEARN a new skill!

The world of information is increasingly vast and also tainted by a great deal of misinformation. Library Lunch and Learn is a series of mini-lectures designed to teach you the specifics of finding and evaluating information. We also demonstrate the ins and outs of individual databases, which offer a wealth of information catered to your area of expertise.

 

January 2021 Schedule – Now Offering Live Sessions

RRC Library is excited to announce the January 2021 schedule of Library Lunch and Learn workshops, in which we will be offering live sessions as well as pre-recorded videos.  For more information, visit the new and improved Library Lunch and Learn site, which lists available topics and links to handouts, guides, and recordings. Please note that live sessions require registration, so click on the links provided below to register.

To view the complete schedule, visit RRC Library’s Events Calendar.

Wednesday, January 6
Live session: 12:15pm – 12:45pm

Rejuvenate Your Learning: Making the Most of LinkedIn Learning*

Library Lunch and Learn - Rejuvenate your learnnig (LinkedIn Learning)

The learning videos formerly known as Lynda.com have found their way into course work and even our library guides. This session provides a refresher on what it is and navigating the various parts of a LinkedIn Learning Course to take advantage of this powerful tool for learning. Join us for a live demonstration of how to make the most of LinkedIn Learning. This 30-minute webinar will allow time to ask questions.

*Live session: registration required

Thursday, January 7
Live session: 12:15pm – 12:45pm

OneSearch (Database Instruction)*

Library Lunch and Learn - OneSearch

The new and improved OneSearch will search print books, ebooks, as well as 30+ full-text databases simultaneously. Join us for a live demonstration and instruction on how to use OneSearch – the Library’s Search engine. This 30-minute webinar will allow time to ask questions.

*Live session: registration required

Friday, January 8 and Tuesday, January 12
Live session: 12:15pm – 12:45pm

Research Skills*

Library Lunch and Learn - Research Skills

The number one problem students have when searching is creating keywords and building them into useful search strategies. Join us and learn some more advanced techniques to breakdown your search question, make finding keywords easier, and using operators to create useful search strategies. This 30-minute webinar will allow time to ask questions.

*Live session: registration required

Thursday, January 14
Live session: 12:15pm – 12:45pm

RefWorks: Reference Management (Software Instruction)*

Library Lunch and Learn - RefWorks

RefWorks simplifies the process of research, collaboration, data organization, and writing by providing an easy-to-use tool for citation, bibliography, and reference management. Learn the basics of using this web-based tool and make writing your papers that much easier. For any person who needs to write and cite! This 30-minute webinar will allow time to ask questions.

*Live session: registration required

Tuesday, January 19
All-day event – pre-recorded

UpToDate (Database Instruction)

Library Lunch and Learn - UpToDate

UpToDate is a point-of-care medical and drug database that contains clinical information intended to assist medical professionals in treating their patients.  It is available to students and staff at Red River College from the Library’s website and can be accessed via an app from anywhere and at any time on your own mobile device. The database is intended for use in clinical settings specifically to improve patient treatment by delivering current information at the point of need, supporting timely decision making, and ensuring consistent care. Learn more about what this database has to offer and how to access and use it.

Thursday, January 21
Live session: 12:15pm – 12:45pm

Peer-Review*

Library Lunch and Learn - Peer-Review

Join us for a live discussion on Peer Review. For many disciplines, peer-reviewed research is required. Not sure if your perfect article is Peer-Reviewed? Check out this session to learn: what is a peer-reviewed (or scholarly) article or journal, how to identify a peer-reviewed article, and where to find peer-reviewed articles. This 30-minute webinar will allow time to ask questions.

*Live session: registration required

Tuesday, January 26
Live session: 12:15pm – 12:45pm

Advanced CINAHL (Database Instruction)*

Library Lunch and Learn - Advanced CINAHL

CINAHL Plus with Full Text is the core research tool for all areas of nursing and allied health literature with full-text coverage of 770 health journals.  Attend this session if you would like to build better searches, know more about MeSH Subject headings, or just be more successful in your searches. Join us and get a look at this powerful database. This 30-minute webinar will allow time to ask questions.

*Live session: registration required

Thursday, January 28
All-day event – pre-recorded

Business Source Complete (Database Instruction)

Library Lunch and Learn - Business Source Complete

This essential database for business students contains tens of thousands of full-text journal and magazine articles as well as newspaper items and e-books. Find current news stories, case studies, industry reports, market research reports, company profiles, SWOT analyses, and more greatly enhance your understanding of the world of business.

Have a question? Ask Us!

To ask a question through our online service desk, simply visit library.rrc.ca and click on the Ask Us button. We’d love to hear from you!


This academic year finds us in quite a different world; however, our commitment to providing you with the supports and services you need to succeed at RRC remains unchanged. As we continue this year together, the Academic Success Centre & Library are here for you.

Warm Up for Your Winter Term

December 17, 2020

During the week of January 4th, students are invited to Warm Up for the winter semester by completing the daily seminars, workshops, and activities at Winter Warm Up Week.

RRC’s Library & Academic Success Centre have partnered with student services across the college to build this schedule of events to help students prepare for a successful Winter Term. Warm Up includes presentations, videos, resources, help desks, and supports you can access online. It’s the perfect opportunity to focus on skills that will maximize your success in your studies, including time management, study skills, getting the most out of your textbooks, managing testing anxiety, putting your strengths to work in your future career, and practicing mindfulness.

Tutoring and advisor support are also available by appointment.

Warm Up Week Schedule

Winter Warm Up offers a broad range of upbeat and informative sessions intended to build you up at the start of the new term. Feel free to attend everything on the list, or pick and choose what is suitable for you. Some sessions require registration, so please visit the Winter Warm Up website for the full details and to register for each session you plan to attend. We look forward to warming up to a new term with you!

Monday, January 4

Click for full details >> Monday Warm Up

9am Technology Skills for Success

10am Technology Literacy / Walk Through of the College Readiness Math

11am Drop-in Mindfulness Practice

12pm Library Help Desk Drop-in

1pm Write Like a Pro!

2pm Fundamentals of Academic Writing

3pm Drop-in Indigenous Support: Round Room with Elder Una

4pm Learning and Sharing Culture at RRC

Tuesday, January 5

Click for full details >> Tuesday Warm Up

9am How to Excel During Remote Learning: What Academic Integrity Really Means

10am Academic Integrity / College Readiness Math Assessment Drop-in

11am Mindful Movement / Yoga with Holly

12pm A Thoughtful Experiment in Copyright / Library Help Desk Drop-in

1pm Setting Goals and Building Habits

2pm Time Management Skills

3pm Stress Management

4pm Immigration Essentials You Need to Know

Wednesday, January 6

Click for full details >> Wednesday Warm Up

9am Reading for Success

10am College Readiness Assessment Drop-in / Reading

11am Drop-in Indigenous Support: Round Room with Elder Jules

12:15pm Making the Most of LinkedIn Learning

1pm Online Learning Strategies

2pm Online Learning

3pm Students Awards & Financial Aid

4pm Making Connections

Thursday, January 7

Click for full details >> Thursday Warm Up

9am Writing for College

10am College Readiness Assessment Drop-in / Research Papers

11am Job Search – Student Employment Services

12:15pm OneSearch (Database Instruction)

1pm “Netiquette” – Professionalism in Online Learning

2pm Virtual Classroom Strategies

3pm Job Interviews – Student Employment Services

4pm Start Strong

Friday, January 8

Click for full details >> Friday Warm Up

9am Professional Power Emails

10am College Readiness Assessment Drop-in / Intercultural Competence

11am “Talk to a Peer” Panel

12:15pm Research Skills

1pm How the ASC Can Help

2pm Working in Teams

3pm Drop-in Indigenous Support: Round Room with Elder Paul

4pm A+ Success Strategies

Have questions?

Connect with us at library.rrc.ca and click on the Ask Us bubble during regular Library hours. We’d love to hear from you!

Open Access Week October 19 – 23

October 9, 2020

Open access logo appears as open lock

 

Image: Rafabollas / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)

Open Access (OA) week 2020 will be hosted internationally October 19 – 25. Open access is a set of principles and a range of practices through which research outputs are distributed online, free of cost or other access barriers. With open access strictly defined, barriers to copying or reuse are also reduced or removed by applying an open license for copyright. We see the principles of OA in Open Education. [i]

Event:

OER logoIf you want to learn more about Open Access and the use of Open Educational Resources (OER) be sure to register for the Red River College Open Access Week Event here: Open Educational Resources (OER) adoption and adaptation Session  – Oct. 20, Noon – 1PM  hosted by the Red River College Copyright Officer in partnership with Campus Manitoba.

 

 

In the Spirit of OA week let’s ask ourselves some complicated questions:

 

Image of bookWhy should Open Access Matter to Educators?

Sun Yang associate professor of China University of Political Science and Law stated “It is naturally accepted that teachers should have the authority to determine the specific use of their course materials by third parties, including their students. Without their permission, no one should copy, distribute, delete or modify the copyrighted course content. In an offline environment, copyright is controlled through physical copies which are purchased. This becomes a challenge in online classrooms.”[ii]

While the original goal of the Open Educational Resource (OER) initiatives was to make higher education more accessible by reducing students costs through the use of openly licensed textbooks these resources now serve educators in the wake of a pandemic as valuable and adaptable tools for the online classroom. OER supports Open Access principles by freely allowing modifications, adaptations, and format transitions without the need to seek costly or time consuming copyright permissions for modification to fit online institutional environments, platforms and classrooms.

The restrictive licensing agreements and terms of copyright applied to many digital textbooks and supplementary materials from publishers make it difficult to adapt materials in new ways to engage students in online learning environments. Materials can further have restrictive licensing agreements that make it confusing to establish when the material can be used in conjunction with a Learning Management System (LMS/LEARN). OER’s have become powerful tools in aiding educators in the adaptability they need to function in continually changing teaching environments that can move from the classroom in person, to digital online learning with little notice and their access to the physical resources of their institutional libraries continues to be limited or completely cut off.

 

Image of grad capWhy Should Open Access Matter to Students?

UNESCO stated that, “…as of 17 May 2020, almost 1.21 billion learners were affected (by the global pandemic), accounting for 69.3% of the world’s student population. The global education community continues to face the major challenge of providing interactive and motivating educational experience during school and university closure. In this special situation, Open Educational Resources (OER) have never been so urgently and broadly needed like today.”[iii]

OER’s can involve students directly in the adaption and building of the learning materials they engage with. They allow students to contribute to online education which can be built upon by others around the globe and allow classes and instructors to source global perspectives to incorporate into College programs. These skills as well as the experience of involvement in the creation of resources for teaching and instruction ensure the student experience is intellectually rigorous, experiential and robust. Student involvement in OER development and adaptation can upon graduation stand as a real world example of experience and skills gained by the student in their education. This can be helpful in providing prospective employers meaningful examples of not only the skills they have acquired but “what” they have accomplished during their studies, in contributing to educational resources that can be used by other educational institutions around the globe.

OER’s and Open Access resources also reduce the cost textbooks and supplementary materials to students as these resources are free and openly available alternatives to traditional textbooks and supplementary material.

 

image of globeWhat is the Role of Open Access in a post pandemic society?

UNESCO (2020) has recently launched a call stating that “the Covid-19 crisis has resulted in a paradigm shift on how learners of all ages, worldwide, can access learning. It is therefore more than ever essential that the global community comes together now to foster universal access to information and knowledge through OER.” [iv] Open Access to information is the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research, and the right to use and re-use those results as you need. Open Access  has the power to transform the way research and scientific inquiry are conducted. It has direct and widespread implications for academia, medicine, science, industry, and for society as a whole.

 

For more on the importance of OA check out this video from PHD Comics.

Sources:

[i] ‘International Open Access week, about page’ Accessed September 30, 2020 http://www.openaccessweek.org/page/about

[ii] Yang, S. (2020). ‘As teaching shifts online during the epidemic, it faces copyright issues.’ Accessed September 30, 2020 https://news.cgtn.com/news/2020-02-20/Copyright-concerns-as-teaching-shifts-online-during-epidemic-OejyJkh3xu/index.html

[iii] & [iv]  UNESCO (2020) ‘Guidance on Open Educational Practices during School Closures: Utilizing OER under COVID-19 Pandemic in line with UNESCO OER Recommendation’ Accessed September 30, 2020 https://iite.unesco.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Guidance-on-Open-Educational-Practices-during-School-Closures-English-Version-V1_0.pdf

 

Library Lunch and Learn – October/November Edition

October 1, 2020

Join Us For Lunch and Learn a New Skill!

Laptop displaying Library Lunch and Learn logo on the screen. Text says, "Library Lunch and Learn Video Version"The world of information is increasingly vast and also tainted by a great deal of misinformation. Library Lunch and Learn is a series of mini-lectures designed to teach you the specifics of finding and evaluating information. We also demonstrate the ins and outs of individual databases, which offer a wealth of information catered to your area of expertise.

October/November 2020 Schedule

Below is the October/November schedule of popular Library Lunch and Learn topics. For the complete list of available Lunch and Learn videos, visit the Library Lunch and Learn page, which is updated weekly.

Monday, October 5
The New PubMed – Nursing Database

Nursing student. Lunch and Learn logo. Text: The New PubMed - Nursing Database

PubMed is an open-access database, created by the National Library of Medicine, that contains more than 30 million citations and abstracts of peer-reviewed biomedical literature. PubMed is used by researchers the world over.

Wednesday, October 7
Business Source Complete – Business Database

Business Student. Lunch and Learn logo. text: Business Source Complete - Business Database.

This essential database for business students contains tens of thousands of full-text journal and magazine articles as well as newspaper items and e-books. Find current news stories, case studies, industry reports, market research reports, company profiles, SWOT analyses, and more greatly enhance your understanding of the world of business.

Wednesday, October 14
Knovel – Engineering Database

Student on construction site. Lunch and Learn logo. Text: Knovel - Engineering Database.

Knovel is more than a database of e-books covering a variety of engineering subject areas. This unique database also features interactive tools including Properties Materials Search; Interactive Equations, the browser-based calculation software – Equation Solver, detailed Unit Converter, Steam Calculators, Interactive Periodical Table, and the ability to create and share folders of your saved results and work.

Monday, October 19
Nursing Reference Centre – Nursing Database

Nursing student. Lunch and Learn logo. Text: Nursing Reference Centre - Nursing Database.

Designed specifically for nurses, this resource provides evidence-based information for point of care, continuing education, drug databases, nursing research, and more.

Wednesday, October 21
How Not to Drown in Information

A person looking up information on a tablet. Lunch and Learn logo. text: How not to drown in information

Forget information overload, we often feel like drowning in information with nobody throwing us a lifeline to shore. From CRAAP to RADAR, pick up some quick tips to evaluate information while researching for an assignment and learn how Google/Wikipedia can work with library resources not against.

Monday, October 26
RxTx – Pharmaceutical and Therapeutic Database

Person in lab coat looking into a microscope. Lunch and Learn logo. text: RxTx - Pharmaceutical and therapeutic database.

RxTx is Canada’s authoritative source for prescribing and managing drug therapy, providing online access to evidence-based, reliable Canadian drug, and therapeutic information. In this session, we will explore the multiple facets of the Canadian Pharmaceutical Association’s RxTx database.

Wednesday, October 28
IBISWorld – Business Database

Business student having a conversation. Lunch and Learn logo.Text: IBISWorld - Business Database.

For Business students and anyone researching industry information, IBISWorld is a go-to database. It provides access to Canadian and US industry reports containing trends, market information, industry statistics, competitive landscape, and other industry-related information.

Monday, November 2
Making the Most of LinkedIn Learning

Man in suit making thumbs up signal. Lunch and learn logo. text: Making the Most of LinkedIn Learning.

The LinkedIn Learning videos, formerly known as Lynda.com, have found their way into course work and even our Library guides. This session provides a refresher on what it is and how to navigate the various parts of a LinkedIn Learning Course to take advantage of this powerful tool for learning.

Wednesday, November 4
MarketLine – Business Database

Person pointing a pen at a sheet with graphs and statistics on it. Library Lunch and Learn logo. Text: MarketLine - Business Database.

Business and Marketing students need to locate quality business information. Be sure to familiarize yourself with Marketline to access 50,000 industry, company, and country profiles. Profiles offer standardized market data, competitive analysis, and other insights into business organization and function. You will also find socio and macroeconomic insights.

Have a question?

Ask Us button for Library chatDuring the Library’s regular hours, a friendly staff member is available to chat with you online. Just click on the Ask Us bubble at library.rrc.ca.


Whether you’re at home or on campus, Library Services is here to support you and help you reach your goals.

Cinematic Journeys Through Truth and Reconciliation Week

September 28, 2020

In honour of Truth and Reconciliation Week (Sep 28 – Oct 2, 2020), RRC Library has compiled three “cinematic journeys” that address topics central to this annual event. The first two collections (“cinemas”) portray residential school experiences and stories of violence against Indigenous women — serious and sensitive topics that may disturb some viewers. The third cinema is a tribute to Indigenous women, revealing the strength, honour, and respect they bring to families and society as a whole. Through real-life stories and perspectives, these films are intended to encourage understanding and participation in the healing process of Truth and Reconciliation.

Explore Further

We encourage you to explore beyond these films by visiting the Truth and Reconciliation webpage developed by RRC’s School of Indigenous Education. Also of interest are the Library’s Indigenous Education Guides and the National Film Board’s listing of Indigenous Cinema.

Cinema 1: Residential Schools

Young Indigenous girl getting her hair cut upon arrival to the residential school. Film title: we were children

We Were Children (2012, 1 h 23 min) The profound impact of the Canadian government’s residential school system is conveyed through the eyes of two children who were forced to face hardships beyond their years. We Were Children gives voice to a national tragedy and demonstrates the incredible resilience of the human spirit.

Image of girl balancing a book on her head. Film title: Holy angels

Holy Angels (2017, 13 min) A powerful portrayal of Canada’s colonialist history using impressionistic images and the fragmented language of a child. Filmed with a fierce determination to not only uncover history but move past it, Holy Angels speaks of the resilience of a people who have found ways of healing—and of coming home again.

Three people sitting on the deck beside a still lake. Film title: Stories are in our bones

Stories are in Our Bones (2019, 11 min) Filmmaker Janine Windolph takes her young sons fishing with their kokum (grandmother), a residential school survivor who retains a deep knowledge and memory of the land. Reconnecting with their homeland is a cultural and familial healing journey for the boys, who are growing up in the city. It’s also a powerful form of resistance for the women.

Indigenous woman with glasses, speaking. Film title: Second stories: it had to be done.

Second Stories – It Had to Be Done (2008, 22 min) Explores the legacy of residential schools through the eyes of two extraordinary women who not only lived it, but who, as adults, made the surprising decision to return to the school that had affected their lives so profoundly. This intimate and moving film affirms their strength and dignity in standing up and making a difference on their own terms.

Cartoon image of a boy in the cold. Film title: The secret path

The secret path (2016, 1 h) This powerful animated film tells the story of Chanie Wenjack, a 12-year-old Ojibwa boy who died of exposure in 1966 while running away from Cecilia Jeffrey Indian Residential School near Kenora, Ontario.

Cinema 2: Violence Against Indigenous Women (MMIWG)

Image of an Indigenous girl. Film title: Finding Dawn

Finding Dawn (2006, 1 h 13 min) Acclaimed Métis filmmaker Christine Welsh brings us a compelling documentary that puts a human face on a national tragedy – the epidemic of missing or murdered Indigenous women in Canada.

Women participating in an awareness march. Film title: Stolen sisters

Stolen Sisters (2007, 43 min) Stolen Sisters takes viewers inside this contentious issue, from the rolling farmland of Saskatchewan to the haunting depths of the dark alleys in Vancouver’s dangerous Hastings district. You will hear the stories of the missing and witness one family’s desperate search for their loved one.

Cinema 3: Honouring Indigenous Women

Sewing together leaves. Film title: Mother of many children

Mother of Many Children (1977, 57 min) Alanis Obomsawin honours the central place of women and mothers within Indigenous cultures. An album of Indigenous womanhood, the film portrays proud matriarchal cultures that for centuries have been pressured to adopt the standards and customs of the dominant society.

Young Indigenous girl participating in drumming group. Film title: Our dear sisters

Our Dear Sisters (1975, 14 min) Alanis Obomsawin, a North American Indian who earns her living by singing and making films, is the mother of an adopted child. She talks about her life, her people, and her responsibilities as a single parent. Her observations shake some of our cultural assumptions.

Indigenous woman with parka on. Film title: Martha of the North

Martha of the North (2008, 1 h 23 min) In the mid-1950s, lured by false promises of a better life, Inuit families were displaced by the Canadian government and left to their own devices in the Far North. In this icy desert realm, Martha Flaherty and her family lived through one of Canadian history’s most sombre and little-known episodes.

Indigenous girl dressed in dancing attire. Film title: This is who I am

This Is Who I Am (2018, 11 min) A young First Nations woman struggles with her identity in the big city. After a series of events, she realizes she can still be Anishinaabe, and in fact, it is her responsibility.

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Honouring Indigenous Themes on National Canadian Film Day

April 22, 2020

What is National Canadian Film Day?

National Canadian Film Day logoNational Canadian Film Day (NCFD), held on April 22, was started by REEL Canada, a charitable organization that celebrates Canada through film. NCFD is a massive one-day, coast-to-coast-to-coast celebration of Canadian cinema. Why did they start it? Because “film – more than any other medium – has the power to capture the soul of a nation, and when we only watch movies from somewhere else, we lose a part of ourselves… there’s no substitute for the connection you can feel when you watch something from your own backyard” (Source: About NCFD). With that mission in mind, NCFD was born.

Honouring Indigenous Themes Through Canadian Film

We delved into the Library’s online video collection and found a number of Canadian productions based on Indigenous themes. Here is a selection of streaming titles that you can enjoy at home (log in may be required).

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PASS SYSTEM (Toronto : V Tape, 2015)

Pass system

The Pass System illuminates Canada’s hidden history of racial segregation. For over 60 years, the Canadian government often denied Indigenous peoples the basic freedom to leave their reserves without a pass. Cree, Saulteaux, Dene, Ojibwe and Blackfoot elders of the prairie land where this took place tell their stories of living under and resisting the system, and link their experiences to today.

 

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STOLEN SISTERS (Toronto : V Tape, 2015)

Stolen sisters

Stolen Sisters takes viewers inside the contentious issue of missing and murdered Aboriginal women, from the rolling farmland of Saskatchewan to the haunting depths of the dark alleys in Vancouver’s dangerous Hastings district. You will hear the stories of the missing and witness one family’s desperate search for their loved one.

 

WE WERE CHILDREN (Montreal : National Film Board of Canada, 2012)

We were children

In this emotional film, the profound impact of the Canadian government’s residential school system is conveyed unflinchingly through the eyes of two children who were forced to face hardships beyond their years. We Were Children gives voice to a national tragedy and demonstrates the incredible resilience of the human spirit.

 

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DANCING AROUND THE TABLE (Ottawa : National Film Board of Canada, 2013)

Dancing around the table (Part one and two)

Part One provides a fascinating look at the crucial role Indigenous people played in shaping the Canadian Constitution. Part Two charts the battle to enshrine Indigenous rights in the Canadian Constitution, capturing a key moment in Canada’s history from the perspective of Indigenous negotiators.

 

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HISTORY OF TREATIES IN CANADA (Pembroke, ON : LeMay Media, 2016)

History of treaties in Canada

From the Royal Proclamation of 1763 to the implementation on of the modern-day Algonquin land claim, The History of Treaties in Canada explores the history, application on and legacy of these foundational legal documents and how they continue to shape and define the often strained relationships between First Nations and the Crown in Canada.

 

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NO TURNING BACK (Montreal : National Film Board of Canada, 2013)

No turning back

For two-and-a-half years, Edmonton director Greg Coyes, worked with teams of Native filmmakers, following the Commission on its journey from coast to coast. The video weaves the passionate and articulate voices of Indian, Inuit, and Metis people with the history of Canada’s relationship with its First Nations peoples.

 

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BEHIND THE MASKS (Ottawa : National Film Board of Canada, 2013)

Behind the masks

A fascinating look at the meaning behind the masks of Indian tribes of the North Pacific coast. Expositor and lecturer is Professor Levi-Strauss of Paris, world-renowned anthropologist and authority on the structural analysis of myth.

 

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KEEPERS OF THE FIRE (Montreal : National Film Board of Canada, 2007)

Keepers of the fire

Mohawk and Haida, Maliseet and Ojibwe these are the voices of ‘warrior women’ — those who have been on the front lines of some of the most important struggles Aboriginal people have faced in the latter part of the 20th century.

 

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FOR ANGELA (Montreal : National Film Board of Canada, 2013)

For Angela

A dramatic story of racism and empowerment, inspired by the experience of Rhonda Gordon and her daughter Angela. A bus ride changed their lives in a way no one could have foreseen. When three boys harass Rhonda and Angela, Rhonda finds the courage and determination to take a unique and powerful stand against ignorance and prejudice.

 

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PATRICK’S STORY (Montreal : National Film Board of Canada, 2013)

Patrick’s story

Patrick Bird was “a casualty of colonialism,” having walked a dark boyhood journey of sexual abuse, neglect, foster homes, detention centres, loss, abadonment, drugs, alcohol, and self-mutilation. With the help of friends and his loving adoptive mother, Patrick begins the search for his identity and spirituality as a Cree man, while discovering his talents in music and acting.

 

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MISSING AND MURDERED ABORIGINAL WOMEN IN CANADA (Orangeville, ON : McIntyre Media, 2016)

Missing and murdered Aboriginal women in Canada

Violence against women is also a serious issue in Canada, unfortunately. One particular group of Canadian women merit special attention: Indigenous women and girls in Canada experience a scale and severity of violence that constitutes a national human rights crisis. The issue of violence against Aboriginal women and girls is a systematic one with deep roots in sexism, poverty and racism.

 

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SACRED SUNDANCE (Montreal : National Film Board of Canada, 2008)

Sacred Sundance

Under a sweltering July sky, participants in the sacred Sundance ceremony go four days without food or water. At the end of the gruelling experience they will pierce the flesh of their chests in an offering to the Creator. The Sundance is a ritual long misunderstood, and once banned – but one that is now helping to bring personal and social healing to East Coast Aboriginal communities.

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In these uncertain times when many of us are unexpectedly isolated in work and study, RRC Library wants you to know that we care and are still here to assist you.