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Out and Proud Resources for Pride Month

June 7, 2021

Pride Month is a celebration and a remembrance of LGBTQ2+ accomplishments. It’s also a reflection on how much further to go before the world recognizes that ‘love is love.  To supplement the college’s  Pride Week Activities, including self-guided courses, the library has several resources depending on the format or looking at one aspect of the community.

Start Here

One place to start is the Gender & Sexual Diversity section of the Intercultural Competency & Diversity Guide for resources about the Transgender community or coming out in general. Place a request for a title or head to the website section for various websites devoted to organizations like Winnipeg’s own Rainbow Resource Centre or a media arts collective known as Love Intersections bringing an intersectional lens to the community.

 

Streaming Videos

A film can provide an intimate look into the lives of individuals within the community with titles looking back on history or looking at present concerns. The National Film Board features many documentaries as part of its LGBTQ2+ channel. Below are three of the many titles making up the channel:

First Stories-Two Spirit 

From the summary:
This short documentary presents the empowering story of Rodney “Geeyo” Poucette’s struggle against prejudice in the Indigenous community as a two spirited person (gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender). Geeyo registers as a dancer in the Kamloopa Powwow under the Jingle Dress category (normally reserved for women). Deeply humiliated by a misguided elder, Geeyo is reminded by his grandmother that two spirited people were once respected and honoured for their spiritual gifts. Geeyo eventually makes a triumphant return to the powwow arena, realizing that the only way to change people’s minds is to walk proudly while being true to one’s spirit. 

Reviving the Roost

From the summary:
Filmmaker and bestselling author Vivek Shraya’s ode to a popular Edmonton gay bar that closed in 2007. With pulsating neon-light animation, Reviving the Roost is a story about community complexity and longing, and an elegy to a lost space.

Standing on the Line

From the summary:
TRIGGER WARNING: This film contains the following subject matter: Suicide and self harm.

In both amateur and professional sports, being gay remains taboo. Few dare to come out of the closet for fear of being stigmatized, and for many, the pressure to perform is compounded by a further strain: whether or not to affirm their sexual orientation.

Breaking the code of silence that prevails on the field, on the ice and in the locker room, this film takes a fresh and often moving look at some of our gay and lesbian athletes, who share their experiences with the camera. They’ve set out to overcome prejudice in the hopes of changing things for the athletes of tomorrow.

 

 

 

 

June is National Indigenous History Month

May 31, 2021

The month of June is National Indigenous History Month — a time for all Canadians to celebrate and appreciate the unique histories, cultures, and contributions of First Nations, Inuit, and Metis people. It is one way to honour Indigenous Peoples’ role in shaping Canadian history and their contributions to protecting democracy. It is also key to recognizing their identity and spirit, which is inherently connected to the land.

In cooperation with Indigenous organizations, the Government of Canada designated June 21, the summer solstice, National Indigenous Peoples Day. For generations, many Indigenous peoples and communities have celebrated their culture and heritage on or near this day.

Due to the seriousness of the COVID-19 crisis, the Government of Canada invites Canadians to celebrate this year’s National Indigenous History Month and National Indigenous Peoples Day from home. Keep yourself, your family and your community safe by following instructions from health officials and other trusted, reliable sources.  (Reference: rcaanc-cirnac.gc.ca)

On the Canadian government website you are invited to learn more about the unique heritage, diverse cultures and outstanding contributions of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples by visiting Celebrating National Indigenous History Month, or by reading a digital copy of one of the books from the #IndigenousReads reading list.

The Red River College Library also invites college students and staff to explore the resources listed below. (College login required)

 

Learn About Indigenous History and Culture Through Films and Books

Catch a glimpse of the richness and breadth of Indigenous culture, diversity, and history through these hand-selected resources. We encourage you to explore the Library’s collection further with our OneSearch tool.

Indigenous Storytelling (eBooks)

Cover art - books about storytelling

kisiskaciwan: Indigenous Voices from Where the River Flows Swiftly 

A ground-breaking anthology from the territory now known as Saskatchewan, this book explores some of the richest and oldest stories from these lands, including voices from Cree, Saulteaux, Dakota, Lakota, Nakota, Dene, and Metis nations.

Centering Anishinaabeg Studies : Understanding the World Through Stories

Written by Anishinaabeg and non-Anishinaabeg scholars, storytellers, and activists, these essays draw upon the power of cultural expression to illustrate active and ongoing senses of Anishinaabeg life.

Coyote and Raven Go Canoeing : Coming Home to the Village

In a gesture toward traditional First Nations orality, Peter Cole blends poetic and dramatic voices with storytelling. A conversation between two tricksters, Coyote and Raven, and the colonized and the colonizers, his narrative takes the form of a canoe journey. It is a celebration of Aboriginal thought, spirituality, and practice, a sharing of lived experience as First Peoples.

Testimonial Uncanny, The : Indigenous Storytelling, Knowledge, and Reparative Practices

Through the study of Indigenous literary and artistic practices from Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the United States, Julia V. Emberley examines the ways Indigenous storytelling discloses and repairs the traumatic impact of social violence in settler colonial nations.

Indigenous Fiction

Song of Batoche

This historical novel reimagines the North-West resistance of 1885 through the Métis women of Batoche, and in particular the rebellious outsider, Josette Lavoie.

Dancing Home

Blackie is out for revenge against the cop who put him in prison on false grounds. He is also craving to reconnect with his grandmother’s country. Driven by his hunger for drugs and payback, Blackie reaches dark places of both mystery and beauty as he searches for peace.

Yellow Line

Vince lives in a small town—a town that is divided right down the middle by race. The unspoken rule has been there as long as Vince remembers and no one challenges it. But when Vince’s friend Sherry starts seeing an Indigenous boy, Vince is outraged—until he notices Raedawn, a girl from the reserve. Trying to balance his community’s prejudices with his shifting alliances, Vince is forced to take a stand, and see where his heart will lead him.

Indigenous Culinary Arts

Where People Feast : An Indigenous People’s Cookbook

Where People Feast, one of very few indigenous cookbooks available, is the culmination of a lifetime dedicated to introducing people to extraordinary foods that are truly North American.

Good Seeds : A Menominee Indian Food Memoir

In this food memoir, named for the manoomin or wild rice that also gives the Menominee tribe its name, tribal member Thomas Pecore Weso takes readers on a cook’s journey through Wisconsin’s northern woods. He connects each food—beaver, trout, blackberry, wild rice, maple sugar, partridge—with colorful individuals who taught him Indigenous values.

A Feast for All Seasons : Traditional Native Peoples’ Cuisine

Traditional Native recipes featuring products from the land, sea and sky, symbols of an enduring cuisine that illustrate respect for the nurturing land, and acknowledgment of the spiritual power food can have in our lives.

 

Streaming Videos

Holy Angels

Holy Angels

National Film Board of Canada – 2017 | 13 min

In 1963, Lena Wandering Spirit became one of the more than 150,000 Indigenous children who were removed from their families and sent to residential school. Jay Cardinal Villeneuve’s short documentary Holy Angels powerfully recaptures Canada’s colonialist history through impressionistic images and the fragmented language of a child. Villeneuve met Lena through his work as a videographer with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Filmed with a fierce determination to not only uncover history but move past it, Holy Angels speaks of the resilience of a people who have found ways of healing—and of coming home again.

 

We Were Children

we were children

National Film Board of Canada – 2012 | 1 h 23 min

In this feature film, the profound impact of the Canadian government’s residential school system is conveyed through the eyes of two children who were forced to face hardships beyond their years. As young children, Lyna and Glen were taken from their homes and placed in church-run boarding schools, where they suffered years of physical, sexual and emotional abuse, the effects of which persist in their adult lives. We Were Children gives voice to a national tragedy and demonstrates the incredible resilience of the human spirit.

 

Four Faces of the Moon

Screenshot

Four Faces of the Moon on Curio.ca | 2016 | 13 min

Follows the animated journey of an Indigenous photographer as she travels through time. She witnesses moments in her family’s history and strengthens her connection to her Métis, Cree and Anishnaabe ancestors. This is a personal story, told in four chapters through the eyes of director and writer Amanda Strong.

 

Karihwanoron : Precious Things

Screenshot

Karihwanoron: Precious Things on Curio.ca | 2017 | 14 min

A small community bands together around a Mohawk immersion school they founded to keep their language alive. Karihwanoron is a Mohawk immersion program that teaches Mohawk language, culture and philosophy. Unfortunately, this year, the school is at risk of having to close its doors. Permanently.

 

nîpawistamâsowin: We Will Stand Up

Cover art

nîpawistamâsowin: We Will Stand Up on NFB Campus | 2019 | 1 h 38 min

Weaves a profound narrative encompassing the filmmaker’s own adoption, the stark history of colonialism on the Prairies, and a vision of a future where Indigenous children can live safely on their homelands.

 

Now Is the Time

Screenshot

Now Is the Time on NFB Campus | 2019 | 16 min

When internationally renowned Haida carver Robert Davidson was only 22 years old, he carved the first new totem pole on British Columbia’s Haida Gwaii in almost a century. On the 50th anniversary of the pole’s raising, Haida filmmaker Christopher Auchter steps easily through history to revisit that day in August 1969, when the entire village of Old Massett gathered to celebrate the event that would signal the rebirth of the Haida spirit.

 

Explore Further with the Library’s Indigenous Guides

Delve further into Indigenous subjects with the Indigenous Education guides. Subject-specific collections on the following topics:

Attention RRC Faculty! Three Ways We Can Help YOU

May 17, 2021

Are you an instructor in an academic program that is being highly impacted by COVID-19… and you need some new supports and resources to address your students’ learning needs online? 

Are you an instructor in a course that is being offered across academic programs… and you would like supports in different student cohorts?

Are you an instructor with students that despite all their efforts fall behind in their coursework… and you are looking for options that support the students while they do not affect your work time?

Join us at Red River College’s RED Forum on Thursday, May 20 at 3:20 p.m.

Staff from different units in Library and Academic Services will be presenting a panel session designed to share scenarios that will underscore the intersection of faculty instruction with library and academic services at the program, cohort and individual level.

The panel will share the suite of student supports that we have continued to develop over this past year in an engaging and interactive way, contextualizing the resources and services to situations you may have now, or may encounter in the future. The presentation will incorporate time for a Q&A section at the end of the session.

Please come to the session reflecting on areas where your students’ academic needs have changed during this past academic year. It is our intention that you will leave the session with a bank of resources that will help you in your everyday work with your students at the College.

For more information about this panel session, contact Dayna Graham at dagraham@rrc.ca.
 

Mental Health Week, May 3 – 9, 2021

May 3, 2021

What is Mental Health Week?  Why do we need a week to focus on this?  I don’t have mental health problems, so why make a big deal out of it?

All good questions with some very important answers.

Mental Health Week helps to break a long-standing veil of secrecy about this important part of our lives.  Talking about mental health destigmatizes it and brings awareness to the fact that no one is immune to mental health issues, be they short or long term, mild or debilitating and that yes, there are resources and treatments available.  In short, this week endeavors to provide information, increase awareness, end stigma and promote treatment.

Mental Health Week Get Real bannerThe Canadian Mental Health Association’s 2021 theme is “#GetReal about how you feel. Name it, don’t numb it”, and in this time of Covid-19, mental health is increasingly being talked about.  We are more anxious, isolated and lonely, and more unsure of the future.  It’s important to give names to our feelings and emotions; the good ones and the difficult and challenging ones too.  Naming your emotions is the first step in dealing with them and recognizing they are normal and we all deal with them.

Mental Health Supports at RRC

Red River College has supports available.  These include the Healthy Minds Healthy College initiative, Mindfulness training through the MindWell platform, Counselling Services, College Athletics programs, an Employee and Family Assistance Program, Mental Health Workshops for students, and more.

RRC Library has many valuable resources also, such as a guide about the Healthy Minds, Healthy College initiative which contains links to print and electronic books, videos and relevant external websites. We also have Light Therapy lamps available to borrow, to combat Seasonal Affective Disorder.

Selected Resources

Below are just two of our many print and electronic resources; please email library@rrc.ca for more resources, or contact us via our Online Chat Service available on our Library Homepage.

                                

Everyday self-care for educators : tools and strategies for well-being

Tantillo Philibert, C., Soto, C., & Veon, L. (2020). Everyday self-care for educators : tools and strategies for well-being. New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.

What to do when college is not the best time of your life

Leibow, D., & Leibow, D. (2010). What to do when college is not the best time of your life. New York: Columbia University Press. https://doi.org/10.7312/leib15174

How is your mental health? If you have concerns remember, help is available and you are not alone.

 

Lunch (and Language) is Served: EAL Support for Jane’s Restaurant Practical Students

April 21, 2021

Written by Emilie Jackson; introduction by Stephen Sawchyn, Academic Success Centre

Introduction

The Academic Success Centre has been helping EAL students in the Hospitality and Tourism Management program prepare to serve tables in Jane’s Restaurant since 2016. With COVID-19 restrictions keeping Jane’s closed to the public in fall 2020 and uncertainty around when students would be able to use the space again, the program decided to suspend language training until the winter term. Read on to hear how EAL Tutor Emilie Jackson successfully moved the language workshop series online, providing 25 students with virtual table-side service opportunities and gaining accolades from students, faculty and senior leadership.

Emilie’s Success Story: Moving the Language Workshop Online

This term I worked with four groups of EAL students in the Hospitality and Tourism Management program to help them prepare for the Restaurant Service Practical course, where students work in Jane’s to learn about fine dining. Three mornings a week for three weeks before their course, we met online to build their language skills. Our goals for the language support sessions were:

  • Learn how to interact with a guest at Jane’s, including greeting the guest, taking their lunch order, serving the meal, and more, which we called the “Server Expectations Script”
  • Become familiar with Jane’s lunch menu, including being able to make recommendations to guests and answer questions about menu terms and items

Our focus was learning the script and menu, but each student brought their own language needs to the sessions. While some students were confident enough in their language skills to jump right into the script or unfamiliar menu terms, others needed to focus on pronunciation, intonation, speed, or overall clarity. Students were aware that once they were on-site at Jane’s, they would be required to wear masks and socially distance, making clear speech even more essential.

Due to various language needs, I provided additional one-on-one tutoring to a few students in each group. These one-on-one sessions were student-led, and we were able to focus in on the phrases, words, or skills that needed special attention. We sang, flapped our arms, stretched out rubber bands to practice word stress, stood up and sat down, learned tongue twisters, and even practiced with masks – anything to build their skills and confidence!

Throughout the sessions, students had access to a Learn course that included materials used in sessions, as well as additional materials to assist in their independent practice.

At the end of our three weeks, the students and I hosted a Virtual Lunch. For this final session, I invited RRC staff and faculty from the Hospitality and Tourism Management program, Academic Success Centre, as well as a few members from the College leadership team to our online meeting to be “served lunch” by the students. Each student ran through the script from beginning to end with a new guest each time, which provided the students the opportunity to interact with new English speakers, receive in-the-moment feedback, and show off their hard work! It is something to be invited to lunch without food, so thank you to all the guests that have joined us over the last few months!

I was continually impressed by the students’ willingness to give their best, make mistakes, learn from each other, practice independently, and ask questions. It was a lesson in adapting to online learning, but the fantastic students made it a worthwhile challenge!

Feedback from the Hospitality and Tourism Management program:

I have been receiving glowing reports about the work Emilie Jackson has been doing with our students in Hospitality. Both our online instructors, and the restaurant instructors tell me the great job Emilie has been doing with supporting our students with language development in our program. The activities and instruction have been excellent.  (Karen McDonald, B.Ed., Chair, School of Hospitality and Culinary Arts)

Highlights of #RRCLongNight2021

April 12, 2021

Thank you to all of the staff and students who attended the virtual Long Night Against Procrastination on Wednesday, April 7, 2021. It was an encouraging evening, where students benefited from help desks, workshops, and wellness activities. The evening commenced with a Welcome Session in which Bettina Allen and Alan Chorney gave a quick tour of the event. Fred Meier gave a short speech, providing a dose of encouraging words and Elder Una said a blessing which set the tone for an uplifting evening.

A total of 54 students registered for the event. The most popular sessions were the Writing Help Desk hosted by Academic Success Centre, the Kahoot Game put on by RRCSA, and the workshop “Job Search: What Gets You Hired” presented by Student Employment Services. Congratulations go out to Riley Pritchard, who won the prize draw for a $20 gift card!

We have a few staff photos to share with you. As you can see, we had a lot of fun with virtual backgrounds!

 

To our students:

Our thoughts are with you, as you wrap up the term and set out to find employment and apply the skills you’ve acquired at RRC. We wish you opportunities that land within the paths of your dreams. Best of luck!

Sexual Violence Awareness – A New Guide from RRC Library

March 31, 2021

Sexual Violence Awareness – Education, Prevention and Supports

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM), a month dedicated to raising awareness about the prevalence and impacts of sexual violence and sharing information about available resources to support survivors of sexual violence. Red River College is committed to creating and maintaining a safe and respectful environment for all members of our College community. This includes a working and learning environment free from all forms of sexual violence.

As part of a sexual assault awareness campaign at the College, a new guide called Sexual Violence Awareness — Education, Prevention and Supports is now available through RRC Library. This guide serves as a jumping-off point for research and resources related to sexual assault and other forms of sexual violence. Within the guide, you will find books, ebooks, videos, websites, and more on topics related to the larger theme of sexual violence.

The Versatility of the Library Guide Format

RRC Library has a broad range of guides, most of which gather together resources on a specific subject area. The guide format is particularly versatile, allowing information to be organized and arranged in multiple ways. Jess Spindler, Resource and Resolution Officer at RRC, was involved in the production of this guide. She describes the value of the library guide format eloquently.

Developing a library guide allowed us to pull together a large number of sources, and present them in a readable, accessible format. One thing I especially like about library guide format is that it allows you to organize readings and resources by subtopic, so the user can find materials specific to what most interests them. — Jess Spindler

An additional feature of guides is that they “are not static, meaning we can continue to add new resources as the literature and body of research grows.”

Fruit of a Collaborative Effort

RRC Library staff are aware that the most valuable guides come from input and collaboration with other College departments, so when Jess reached out to the Library about building this guide, she received a favourable response.

I approached Rosemary Woodby, a staff member at the Library, about an idea to bring together resources on the topic of sexual violence and supports for survivors as part of an awareness campaign for Sexual Assault Awareness Month in April. Rosemary was a pleasure to work with and helped identify a number of current texts within the library’s existing collection to highlight.

This is not the first time a guide collaboration has reaped fruitful results. Other successful joint efforts with Rosemary Woodby involved guides for students in Engineering Technology and Oncology Nursing.

Do you have an idea for a Library Guide?

If you have an idea for a guide that you would like to see developed, please contact us. We would love to hear from you, and we are always open to suggestions!

Red River College Historical Digital Archive

March 22, 2021

Yearbook Archives

You will now find yearbooks from 1966 to 1990 in our archives.

For many years, the Red River College Library has been interested in the digitization of historical RRC documents and photos. However, we could not make much headway in this area as our staff lacked proper archiving knowledge, experience and time. Norman Beattie, our recently retired Public Services Librarian, managed to make some progress in developing our archives on his own time, and by using work placement students to help out with document scanning.

In 2019, after being approved for a Manitoba Heritage grant, we began to digitize more materials. Using this funding, we were able to hire an archivist to assess our situation and provide a guiding document, and a term employee to sort through materials, digitize and meta-tag as much as funding would allow. What was discovered is a mountain of historical documents and photos! Still, progress was made, and with additional help from the Red River College Print Shoppe we managed to digitize a full set of yearbooks from 1966-1990 in high resolution, and scan and meta-tag about 6,000 high-res photos.

As our digital archive began to take shape, we began to upload documents to OMEKA.NET, a third-party website that provides a web platform specifically for digital archives such as ours. Our archive is now online, and can be found at the address https://redrivercollege.omeka.net/.

More recently, we have made the yearbooks from 1966 to 1990 available to the public. We feel these documents will garner the greatest interest from the college community, alumni and public in general. In the past, we had already placed historical Staff Newsletters and a selection of photos on the archive site. Again, there is sure to be good interest in these fantastic photos and documents.

There is more work to be done, as there are still thousands of photos that are yet to be uploaded to the site. Also, we are working toward ensuring that visitors to our OMEKA site can search within the documents in the archive. Finally, we soon hope to have our archive records appear in searches via our Library OneSearch feature.

To view the work completed so far, or for a nostalgic voyage back in time, visit our archive site.

Submitted by Mark Nelson

Academic Success Centre develops new Anti-Racism Training for Students

March 17, 2021

Picture of Red River College buildingIn the context of March 21 – International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, and City of Winnipeg’s Anti-Racism Week from March 21-27, Academic Success Centre is proud to share that is finalizing the development of a new Anti-Racism Training for Students. Once finalized, this training will join our Diversity Training suite of workshops that already includes Intercultural Competence Training and Gender and Sexual Diversity Awareness Training. (More information about our Diversity Training is available here.)

When we think and talk about racism, most people reference examples of interactions between people. However, racism is also maintained by institutions and society through the implementation of policies, practices, and programs. This training is an introduction on how racism functions as an interconnected system. The training will go over historical instances of racism and it will also focus on current examples of racism.

It is our goal that the Anti-Racism Training will support our students and contribute to the College’s educational efforts in enhancing our knowledge and understanding about racism, acknowledging how racism has shaped our thinking and actions, and speaking out against racism and systemic barriers.

The Anti-Racism Training for Students includes key concepts and frameworks, as well as activities for reflection and discussion. The training also presents a curated suite of relevant videos to amplify the voices and lived experiences of racialized people and Indigenous people. At the end of each training module, students will receive a set of key strategies and resources to map out a personal Action Plan and foster an ongoing student learning and action experience.

After piloting this training in the Spring/Summer time, we expect to offer this training for students from the Fall academic term on. The training modules will be delivered as live workshops via Webex, and will also be recorded for later screening as needed. Workshops are facilitated by Academic Success Centre’s diversity facilitators, and faculty is encouraged to take advantage of this new resource to support their students and book workshops to be delivered during class time, as time allows.

As an additional resource, students and faculty can also access a new Anti-Racism Learning Toolkit developed together with Library staff. This guide is available here and features curated videos, readings and other resources from the College and the community at large.

For more information about the Anti-Racism Training for Students, please connect with Nora Sobel, Diversity Initiatives Coordinator (Academic Success Centre) at nsobel@rrc.ca.

Library Lunch and Learn | Spring 2021

March 14, 2021

Join us for LUNCH and LEARN a new skill!

RRC Library is offering its spring line-up of Library Lunch and Learn sessions, which highlight research-based topics and databases presented by our knowledgeable reference staff. These short webinars run from 12:15 to 12:45 pm, and allow time to interact and ask questions. For accompanying materials and pre-recorded versions, visit Library Lunch & Learn.

Spring Schedule (March/April)

The following live presentations require registration to attend. Once you have registered, you will receive a link to access the online session. To view the schedule at a glance, click here: Library Lunch and Learn Calendar.

Monday, March 22:
OneSearch (Database Instruction)

Library Lunch and Learn - OneSearch image

The new and improved OneSearch will search print books, ebooks, as well as 30+ full-text databases simultaneously. Join us for a live demonstration and instruction on how to use OneSearch – the Library’s Search engine. Click to register


Wednesday, March 24:
Research Skills – Part 1 of 2

Library Lunch and Learn - Research Skills image

The number one problem students have when searching is creating keywords and building them into useful search strategies. Join us and learn some more advanced techniques to break down your search question, make finding keywords easier, and using operators to create useful search strategies. Click to register


Thursday, March 25:
Research Skills – Part 2 of 2

Library Lunch and Learn - Research Skills image

The number one problem students have when searching is creating keywords and building them into useful search strategies. Join us and learn some more advanced techniques to breakdown your search question, make finding keywords easier, and using operators to create useful search strategies. Click to register


Monday, March 29:
RefWorks – Reference Management

Library Lunch and Learn - RefWorks image

RefWorks simplifies the process of research, collaboration, data organization, and writing by providing an easy-to-use tool for citation, bibliography, and reference management. Learn the basics of using this web-based tool and make writing your papers that much easier. For any person who needs to write and cite! Click to register


Wednesday, March 31:
UpToDate (Database Instruction)

Library Lunch and Learn - UpToDate iimage

UpToDate is a point-of-care medical and drug database that contains clinical information intended to assist medical professionals in treating their patients.  It is available to students and staff at Red River College from the Library’s website and can be accessed via an app from anywhere and at any time on your own mobile device. The database is intended for use in clinical settings specifically to improve patient treatment by delivering current information at the point of need, supporting timely decision making, and ensuring consistent care. Learn more about what this database has to offer and how to access and use it. Click to register


Wednesday, April 7:
Advanced CINAHL (Database Instruction)

Library Lunch and Learn - Advanced CINAHL image

CINAHL Plus with Full Text is the core research tool for all areas of nursing and allied health literature with full-text coverage of 770 health journals.  Attend this session if you would like to build better searches, know more about MeSH Subject headings, or just be more successful in your searches. Join us and get a look at this powerful database. This 30-minute webinar will allow time to ask questions. Click to register


Monday, April 12:
Peer-Review

Library Lunch and Learn - Peer-Review

Join us for a live discussion on Peer Review. For many disciplines, peer-reviewed research is required. Not sure if your perfect article is Peer-Reviewed? Check out this session to learn: what is a peer-reviewed (or scholarly) article or journal, how to identify a peer-reviewed article, and where to find peer-reviewed articles. This 30-minute webinar will allow time to ask questions. Click to register


Wednesday, April 14:
Business Source Complete (Database Instruction)

Library Lunch and Learn - Business Source Complete image

This essential database for business students contains tens of thousands of full-text journal and magazine articles as well as newspaper items and e-books. Find current news stories, case studies, industry reports, market research reports, company profiles, SWOT analyses, and more greatly enhance your understanding of the world of business. Click to register


Monday, April 19:
Crediting Ideas – Resources to Help Avoid Plagiarism

Library Lunch and Learn - Crediting Ideas image

Join us for a live discussion on how to credit your ideas and avoid plagiarism. This short overview offers students a chance to learn about citation tools and references to better credit ideas. Click to register


Wednesday, April 21:
Nursing Reference Center (Database Instruction)

Nursing student. Lunch and Learn logo. Text: Nursing Reference Centre - Nursing Database.

Designed specifically for nurses, this resource provides evidence-based information for point of care, continuing education, drug databases, nursing research, and more. Come learn what the Nursing Reference Center (NRC) can do for you. Click to register


Monday, April 26:
IBISWorld (Business Database Instruction)

Library Lunch and Learn - IBIS World

For Business students and anyone researching industry information, IBISWorld is a go-to database. It provides access to Canadian and US industry reports containing trends, market information, industry statistics, competitive landscape, and other industry-related information. Click to register


Wednesday, April 28:
PubMed (Biomedical Database Instruction)

Library Lunch and Learn - The New PubMed image

PubMed is an open-access database, created by the National Library of Medicine, that contains more than 30 million citations and abstracts of peer-reviewed biomedical literature. PubMed is used by researchers the world over. In this session, we will explore the multiple facets of the popular PubMed database. Click to register


Contact Us

If you have a question or comment regarding Library Lunch and Learn, please contact event organizer, Rosemary Woodby.