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Paramedicine and Primary Care Paramedic Guide

September 18, 2019

This guide can assist you in exploring topics about emergency medicine and about the skills that every successful paramedicine practitioner uses and needs.  Discover a wealth of evidence based clinical resources on prehospital care in both electronic and print formats, including book titles, streaming videos, sources for journal articles, and useful websites.  And learn practical research tips and techniques, as well as helpful advice on writing papers and citing your sources.

Find the PARAMEDICINE & PRIMARY CARE PARAMEDIC GUIDE here:

RRCLibrary.libguides.com/paramedicine

or

  1. Go to library.rrc.ca
  2. Click on “Your GUIDE is ready
  3. Select the subject box – PARAMEDICINE & PRIMARY CARE PARAMEDIC is in the NURSING, ALLIED HEALTH & LIFE SCIENCES section – to see all the guides on this subject
  4. Click the desired guide and you have a great starting point.

Other guides you may find interesting:

What is a Guide?

Guides are curated web pages created by our library staff. Many people who are starting to explore a topic aren’t sure where to start – there are so many options and it can be overwhelming.

Guides are a starting spot for students looking for more information on a particular topic in the collection. A guide will typically include featured books and journals (both print and electronic), databases, Videos (DVDs and streaming) and websites. They may also include specialized information specific to the topic (i.e. WHIMIS or resources specific to an assignment).

Do not hesitate to contact guide owners (information is on the guide) if you have any suggestions to improve this guide (content or special interest areas) or stop by the library – we would love to hear from you. If you would like to see a specific guide for a particular topic please let us know.

We encourage you to share this resource with your students, include it on your Learn site and help us promote this Library tool.

Lunch & Learn at the Notre Dame Campus Library

September 17, 2019

Bring your lunch and learn a new skill

The Notre Dame Campus Library will be presenting a series of drop-in mini-lectures in our classroom this year. Each session will feature one topic to help you find and access quality information efficiently. Topics include:

  • OneSearch (new and enhanced!)
  • Specialty databases such as eCPS, CINAHL, Knovel, Nursing Reference Centre, and UpToDate
  • Research topics such as identifying Peer Reviewed Journals and preventing information overload by using Google, Wikipedia and the Web effectively

Location: Notre Dame Campus Library Classroom

Date: every second Thursday starting in October

Time: 12:15-12:45pm

2019/2020 Series Schedule

Date Time Topic Facilitator
Oct 3 12:15-12:45pm OneSearch (new and improved) Rosemary
Oct 17 12:15-12:45pm How Not to Drown In Information Fatima
Oct 31 12:15-12:45pm UpToDate (database) John Mark
Nov 14 12:15-12:45pm Peer Reviewed Journals 101 Rosemary
Nov 28 12:15-12:45pm CINAHL Plus Joan
Dec 12 12:15-12:45pm eCPS (database) Rosemary
Jan 16 12:15-12:45pm OneSearch (new and improved) TBD
Jan 30 12:15-12:45pm Knovel (database) TBD
Feb 13 12:15-12:45pm TBA TBD
Feb 27 12:15-12:45pm Nursing Reference Centre (database) TBD
Mar 5 12:15-12:45pm TBA TBD
Mar 19 12:15-12:45pm TBA TBD
Apr 9 12:15-12:45pm TBA TBD

Schedule is subject to change – always check the Events Calendar at Library.rrc.ca for current sessions.

Series Descriptions

OneSearch (new and improved)

The library has upgraded its Online Catalogue! The new and improved, OneSearch will search print books, ebooks and a variety of databases simultaneously. Come spend 30 min in the library and learn how to use this powerful tool.

  • Handouts (links will be added after the presentation)

How Not to Drown In Information

Forget information overload, we often feel like drowning in information with nobody throwing us a lifeline to shore. From CRAAP to RADAR, pick up some quick tips to evaluate information while researching for an assignment and learn how Google/Wikipedia can work with library resources not against.

  • Handouts (links will be added after the presentation)

UpToDate

UpToDate is point-of-care medical and drug database that contains clinical information intended to assist medical professionals in treating their patients.  It is available to students and staff at Red River College from the Library’s website and can be accessed via an app from anywhere and at any time on your own mobile device. The database is intended for use in clinical settings specifically to improve patient treatment by delivering current information at the point of need, supporting timely decision making and insuring consistent care. Learn more about what this database has to offer and how to access and use it.

  • Handouts (links will be added after the presentation)

Peer Reviewed Journals 101

For many disciplines peer reviewed research is required. Not sure if your perfect article is Peer Reviewed? Check out this session to learn: what is a peer reviewed (or scholarly) article or journal, how to identify a peer reviewed article and where to find peer reviewed articles.

  • Handouts (links will be added after the presentation)

CINAHL Plus

CINAHL Plus with Full Text is the core research tool for all areas of nursing and allied health literature with full text coverage of 770 health journals.  Attend this session if you would like to build better searches, know more about MeSH Subject headings, or just be more successful in your searches.

  • Handouts (links will be added after the presentation)

eCPS – the Online Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties (CPS)

Looking for drug monographs? Need information on medications before you go on your clinical? This lecture will talk about the online CPS and all the features available through this powerful database including monographs, glossaries, calculators and CPS notifications and advisories.

  • Handouts (links will be added after the presentation)

More Information

Visit library.rrc.ca for more information about specific dates and topics. Stay tuned to your student and staff news for updates in your inbox.

If you have suggestions for topics would like to see presented in the 2020 series please contact Rosemary Woodby at rwoodby@rrc.ca.

Intercultural Competence and Diversity Guide

September 11, 2019

Our community is composed of people from diverse cultural backgrounds, including different national or ethnic affiliations, language, gender identity, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, age, physical and cognitive abilities, spiritual beliefs, marital/parental status. Our intent with this guide is to offer a starting point in an understanding of our cultural identities and building on the skills to bridge cross-cultural differences. These resources may also help enhance intercultural communication, a key ingredient in an expanding world. This guide also offers resources to help enhance our awareness about gender and sexual diversity and understanding of how gender and sexual identities are unique, fluid and complex.

Find the INTERCULTURAL COMPETENCE & DIVERSITY guide here:

RRCLibrary.libguides.com/Intercultural_Competence_Diversity

or

  1. Go to library.rrc.ca
  2. Click on “Your GUIDE is ready
  3. Select the subject box – INTERCULTURAL COMPETENCE & DIVERSITY is in the https://rrclibrary.libguides.com/StudentSuccess section – to see all the guides on this subject
  4. Click the desired guide and you have a great starting point.

Other guides you may find interesting:

What is a Guide?

Guides are curated web pages created by our library staff. Many people who are starting to explore a topic aren’t sure where to start – there are so many options and it can be overwhelming.

Guides are a starting spot for students looking for more information on a particular topic in the collection. A guide will typically include featured books and journals (both print and electronic), databases, Videos (DVDs and streaming) and websites. They may also include specialized information specific to the topic (i.e. WHIMIS or resources specific to an assignment).

Do not hesitate to contact guide owners (information is on the guide) if you have any suggestions to improve this guide (content or special interest areas) or stop by the library – we would love to hear from you. If you would like to see a specific guide for a particular topic please let us know.

We encourage you to share this resource with your students, include it on your Learn site and help us promote this Library tool.

Library Services: Hub for Success

August 26, 2019

A Warm Welcome

RRC Library Services is evolving. In the past year we have seen some exciting improvements in our department. Read on to explore the variety of spaces and services available at the Library. As we embark on a new school year, we would like to extend a warm welcome to the students and staff we serve at Red River College.

Library Services

Library Services has expanded!  Academic Success Centre (ASC) and Library Services are now operating out of our Notre Dame Campus and Exchange District Campus Library spaces. We are the hub for supports and resources for both staff and students at the College.

Academic Success Centre

Visit the ASC website for more information about the free services they offer and how to access them.

Library

Library staff are information professionals, trained to help you find and assess information. While the general public is familiar with using Wikipedia and Google, our Library staff are experienced with an array of sources and skills that you may be unaware of. While we offer assistance in navigating information sources, we also want you to know you can ask us anything! We are here to support you!

The following is a list of common Library services:
  • Reference consultations: one-on-one assistance locating information
  • Audio visual services: AV equipment loans and video
  • Library orientations: class orientations (instructors may contact us to arrange this)
  • Collection development: resources to support learning and instruction at the College (instructors may recommend a purchase)
  • Guides: online guides on multiple subjects to assist research and academic success
  • Technical support: troubleshooting and technical assistance (in person at the Help Desk and online)
  • Chat Service: online chat service (visit the Library website to try it out!)
  • Borrowing Services: free access to books, e-books, journals, e-journals, databases, DVDs, streaming video, and audiovisual equipment. Keep in mind that what you see on the shelf is just the tip of the iceberg. Many of our digital resources may be accessed on any computer or mobile device. We encourage you to explore the Library collection with our NEW OneSearch.

Library Spaces: Notre Dame Campus

Improvements are happening to the Library spaces. See below for a brief tour of the variety of spaces available to you at NDC Library.

Quiet and Group Study Areas

The Quiet Study Area is for focused, silent individual work. The Group Study Area is for open conversation and group work.

Tutor Rooms and Portable White Boards (NEW additions to the Group Study Area)

The tutor rooms – with glass fronts on them – are set aside for tutors to work with students. One room only is for available for students to book using the posted sign-up sheet (max 2 hrs/day). The new sliding white boards are located in the Group Study Area.

Reading areas with comfy chairs, side tables and more

There are multiple reading areas where students can sit comfortably and relax (or work on a puzzle). Also look out for our New Books display, which features all of our new arrivals.

Book Stacks (located in the Quiet Study Area)

Our books and back issues of journals are located on the Quiet side of the Library.

Computer Lab

The Computer Lab (and adjoining Classroom) have computers, printers, a copier and a scanning station. Technical assistance is also available at our Help Desk. Orientations and sessions such as our upcoming Lunch and Learn are held in the Classroom.

RRC Library: A Safe Place to Be

Library Services offers a safe, non-judgmental environment where all questions are good ones! We invite you to make use of the Library spaces and services, and explore our website to see what interests you. Best wishes in your studies, teaching and service at the College.

— posted by Linda Fox, RRC Library

The RRC Library can help with technical hurdles

August 23, 2019

At the Library we are familiar with the technical hurdles that may face students. In this article, we will list some of the more common technical questions we get, and outline how you can overcome technical problems and succeed in your studies.

Connecting to Wireless

Staff and students should connect through the Wireless Network named RRCWireless. Do not connect to RRCGUEST.

The Red River College Library continues to receive inquiries about the wireless network. However,  at the Library we are wireless users, just like you! At RRC, the Information Technology Solutions department manages the wireless networks.

There is an online technical guide if you are having difficulty connecting your device to wireless:

There are four important lessons to remember when connecting to RRCWireless:

  1. Always use RRCWireless. Don’t use RRCGuest.
  2. Login with the same username and password you use in HUB.
  3. If you are a returning student, and you had to reset your password over the summer, use “forget this network” and setup a fresh connection to RRCWireless.
  4.  If your device was set with an old password, this will cause the college’s wireless system to lock out your device. Unfortunately, when you attempt to reconnect with your username and a correct password you may still be locked out! Just forget the network, wait 30 minutes, and attempt to connect again

Student Email

To connect your student email to your mobile device, follow the instructions posted on this page:

Microsoft Office

Academic licensing allows students to install Office 365 on their personal computer. To do so, you need to follow the instructions in this guide:

Printing

Details of your “printing account” can be found by logging in to the “Papercut” application on a college computer, or browsing to the the papercut website:

The Library has a guide that will help you installing College Printers on your personal laptop:

Getting Help

You are welcome to visit one of the Library Helpdesks for face-to-face support:

  • Roblin Centre Lower Learning Commons:  Weekdays 8:00AM to 4:00 PM
  • Notre Dame Campus Library Computer Lab:  Weekdays 8:00AM to 4:00 PM

Library Helpdesk staff are great at helping students diagnose a wide variety of issues.

Academic Success Centre: Moving, Evolving, Expanding!

July 24, 2019

This past year was an exciting one for the Academic Success Centre! You may have noticed a few changes, including our physical move to Library Services. The relocation of tutoring, academic coaching and EAL supports under the umbrella of the Library has served to increase access and create a hive of academic support and resource services at the heart of NDC and EDC.

The move this past year was incremental, with the introduction of writing, stats and math help desks in the Library lobby, and with the gradual build of small and large group tutoring spaces at both campuses. The 2019/2020 academic year will be one of full integration, with all ASC activity located in or near each campus library.

In addition to creating a one-stop-access point for students, ASC and Library staff have begun to collaborate on new projects and services, increasing the power and scope of RRC academic, resource and research supports and services.

And now we are also part of the Library website! We have re-organized the information about our ASC services and learning resources to make the navigation of the content more efficient, while also making seamless connections with Library resources. Check out our new web presence at https://rrclibrary.libguides.com/asc.

Wishing you a nice summer time and a great beginning of classes in the Fall!

Associations Canada Online

June 21, 2019

Are you looking for organizations and contacts for student work placements? Does your department or program engage in community outreach? Perhaps it’s time to reinvigorate your organizational and community networking and contact lists.

The Library is excited to highlight the new Associations Canada Online database, which provides detailed profiles to over 20,000 Canadian and international organizations and associations, including nearly 1,000 from Manitoba. Each profile includes names, full addresses, complete contact information including website and social media addresses, budgets, sources of funding, and much more.

Other information found in the database:

Meetings, Conferences & Conventions
When and where events are happening in your field.

Awards, Scholarships & Grants
Details on awards and grants offered by Canadian associations.

Registered Charitable Organizations
Lists of associations that are registered charities, searchable by subject.

Search through the database with a seemingly endless number of search fields and limiters (budget size, city, contact name, number of employees, membership fees, etc.), and find out firsthand just how useful the resource can be for your department. Find the database on the Library Homepage under Articles/Databases, or use this link.

Blog author: Jordan Zimmerly

1919 Winnipeg General Strike 100th Anniversary

May 23, 2019

RNWMP operations in Winnipeg General Strike, 1919. Canadian government / Royal North West Mounted Police; declared to be in the Public Domain, http://collectionscanada.gc.ca/pam_archives/index.php?fuseaction=genitem.displayItem&lang=eng&rec_nbr=3615118 [Public domain]

He was one of two people fatally shot in a crowd of thousands. However, the ambiguity surrounding his death seems to outweigh the death itself. Did he antagonize his aggressors or was he a passive victim? Hit by a stray bullet, perhaps? Even the spelling of his name is up for debate. Mike Sokolowski, a Ukrainian working class immigrant who was shot by North-West Mounted Police while protesting, was one of several notable people involved in the Winnipeg General Strike of 1919 who are now buried at the Brookside Cemetery, which neighbours Red River College’s Notre Dame Campus.

As part of the Winnipeg General Strike’s 100th anniversary activities, former CUPE president Paul Moist has organized walking tours at the Brookside Cemetery. Information regarding the official tours can be found here. For those interested in doing a daytime tour during the week, Paul is offering a lunch hour tour on two weekdays for the RRC community specifically. Attendees are welcome to attend one or both days—a different section of the cemetery will be explored each day.

Anyone planning to attend should email the Library at circndc@rrc.ca indicating which day(s) they will be attending. Attendance is limited to 20 participants for each day.

  • When: 12:00-1:00 PM, Wednesday, June 12. 12:00-1:00 PM, Thursday, June 13.
  • Where: Meet in front of the Administration Building at the Brookside Cemetery.

*All participants must read the Safety Guidelines.

For other exciting community events and opportunities to commemorate the Winnipeg General Strike’s 100th anniversary, be sure to check out the Manitoba Federation of Labour website and the display at the library entrance.

While the strike began as a means to improve workers’ rights, it revealed other societal issues and influenced more than just the world of organized labour. Underlying issues in politics, women’s rights, and immigration were all brought to light by the strike. If you want to learn more about the strike itself, or are interested by some of these surrounding issues, consider checking out some of the following physical and online resources that are offered at the library. Many of them will be out in the library’s main display case.

Print resources:

The Bolshevik’s Revenge (A Sam Klein mystery) – Allan Levine

The “war to end all wars” has just ended, the Bolsheviks have seized power in Russia and most of the Western world is convinced that a widespread workers’ revolt is imminent. Winnipeg is no exception as sector after sector of the city is shut down by a massive General Strike, and when one of the city’s most prominent capitalists is murdered, detective Sam Klein is called in to solve the case before the city erupts in chaos.

 

Negotiating Sex Work: Unintended Consequences of Policy and Activism – Edited by Carisa Renae Showden and Samantha Majic

Attitudes on sex work are primarily divided between those who consider that selling sexual acts is legitimate work and those who consider it a form of exploitation. Organized into three parts, Negotiating Sex Work rejects this either/or framework and offers instead-diverse and compelling contributions that aim to reframe these viewpoints.

 

We’re Going to Run This City: Winnipeg’s Political Left After the General Strike – Stefan Epp-Koop

We’re Going to Run This City explores the dynamic political movement that came out of the largest labour protest in Canadian history and the ramifications for Winnipeg throughout the 1920s and 1930s.

 

 

Working People: An Illustrated History of the Canadian Labour Movement – Desmond Morton

Working People tells the story of the men and women in the labour movement in Canada and their struggle for security, dignity, and influence in our society. Highlighting some of the great events of labour history, Desmond Morton explores the clash between idealists, who fought for socialism, industrial democracy, and equality for women and men, and the realists who wrestled with the human realities of self-interest, prejudice, and fear.

 

E-resources:

Bloody Saturday: The Winnipeg General Strike – CBC documentary by Andy Blicq

Was the strike a legitimate protest against low wages, poor working conditions and a lack of bargaining rights, or was it an attempt by immigrants to import “Bolshevism” and a new political order? Bloody Saturday takes a contemporary look at the key moments of the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike and how lives were lost and changed.

 

Transforming Labour: Women and Work in Post-War Canada – Joan Sangster

Transforming Labour offers one of the first critical assessments of women’s paid labour during the quarter century after the close of the Second World War, a period when more and more women, particularly those with families, were going ‘out to work’. Using case studies from across Canada, Joan Sangster explores a range of themes, including women’s experiences within unions, Aboriginal women’s changing patterns of work, and the challenges faced by immigrant women. By charting women’s own efforts to ameliorate their work lives as well as factors that re-shaped the labour force, Sangster challenges the commonplace perception of this era as one of conformity, domesticity for women, and feminist inactivity.

 

Uberworked and Underpaid: How Workers are Disrupting the Digital Economy – Trebor Scholz

One of network culture’s toughest critics, Trebor Scholz chronicles the work of workers in the “sharing economy,” and the free labor on sites like Facebook, to take these myths apart. In this rich, accessible, and provocative book, Scholz exposes the uncaring reality of contingent digital work, which is thriving at the expense of employment and worker rights. The book is meant to inspire readers to join the growing number of worker-owned “platform cooperatives,” rethink unions, and build a better future of work. A call to action, loud and clear, Uberworked and Underpaid shows that it is time to stop wage theft and “crowd fleecing,” rethink wealth distribution, and address the urgent question of how digital labor should be regulated and how workers from Berlin, Barcelona, and Seattle can act in solidarity to defend their rights.

 

Blog author: Jordan Zimmerly

Welding Guide

May 7, 2019

Myth: Trades students don’t use the library.

Fact: Many do especially to learn WHMIS on our computers, get WI-FI on their personal devices, or ask general questions. Why? We provide a service to help students access the information they need in an approachable manner. This same goal goes into the new Welding guide with information about our welding resources from print to streaming video, perhaps answer a point-of-need question, and maybe serve as a starting point to begin asking those questions.  The guide aims to complement the hands-on learning in the shop while pursuing life-long learning.

Find the WELDING guide here:

RRCLibrary.libguides.com/welding

or

  1. Go to library.rrc.ca
  2. Click on “Your GUIDE is ready
  3. Select the subject box – Welding is in the Skilled Trades section – to see all the guides on this subject
  4. Click the desired guide and you have a great starting point.

Other guides you may find interesting:

What is a Guide?

Guides are curated web pages created by our library staff. Many people who are starting to explore a topic aren’t sure where to start – there are so many options and it can be overwhelming.

Guides are a starting spot for students looking for more information on a particular topic in the collection. A guide will typically include featured books and journals (both print and electronic), databases, Videos (DVDs and streaming) and websites. They may also include specialized information specific to the topic (i.e. WHIMIS or resources specific to an assignment).

Do not hesitate to contact guide owners (information is on the guide) if you have any suggestions to improve this guide (content or special interest areas) or stop by the library – we would love to hear from you. If you would like to see a specific guide for a particular topic please let us know.

We encourage you to share this resource with your students, include it on your Learn site and help us promote this Library tool.

Earth Day 2019

April 15, 2019

Earth day AV display ad

With more than 1 billion people participating in Earth Day activities each year, Earth Day (April 22) has become the world’s largest environmental movement. To celebrate Earth Day, AV Services at the Notre Dame Campus Library has put together a selection of intriguing videos designed to inform us about environmental issues. We invite you to come by the Library and find something to watch or stay online and view in streaming mode (log in required).

Learn more: Earth Day 2019 Videos

Earth Day 2019 Video Highlights

Streaming Video

Below are four streaming video highlights from Earth Day 2019 selections. For more options, try your own search of the Library’s collection (examples below):

Carbon nation cover artTrou story cover art Toxic trespass cover art This changes everything cover art

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summaries

Carbon nation  A documentary movie about climate change solutions. Even if you doubt the severity of the impact of climate change or just don’t buy it at all, this is still a compelling and relevant film that illustrates how solutions to climate change also address other social, economic and national security issues.

Trou Story  The history of mining in Canada is the story of astronomical profits made with disregard for the environment and human health. Using striking images, rare archival footage, interviews and their trademark humorous social commentary, the directors make a compelling case against the way mining has been done in Canada.

Toxic Trespass  Delves into the chemical soup that surrounds us and that we’ve taken for granted. We meet passionate activists, doctors and scientists who see clear evidence of often-denied links between the environment and health, and are working for change.

This Changes Everything  Presents seven powerful portraits of communities on the front lines, from Montana’s Powder River Basin to the Alberta Tar Sands, from the coast of South India to Beijing and beyond. Interwoven with these stories of struggle is Klein’s narration, connecting the carbon in the air with the economic system that put it there.

DVDs

Below are four DVD highlights from Earth Day 2019 selections. We invite you to search our catalogue to find what interests you and/or visit the Library for friendly and knowledgeable service.

Racing to zero cover art Mother: caring for 7 billion cover art Trees in trouble cover art Queen of the sun cover art

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summaries

Racing to Zero  Follows the collective zero waste efforts of San Francisco, which is successfully taking the necessary steps: increased recycling, creative re-purposing, composting to recycle organics back into the earth, and changing patterns of production and consumption. Diminishing non-recyclables have already radically reduced the amount of garbage that is sent to the city’s landfills.

Mother: Caring for 7 Billion  Brings to light an issue that silently fuels our largest environmental, humanitarian and social crises – population growth. Since the 1960s the world population has nearly doubled, adding more than 3 billion people. At the same time, talking about population has become politically incorrect because of the sensitivity of the issues surrounding the topic- religion, economics, family planning, and gender inequality. The film illustrates both the over consumption and the inequity side of the population issue.

Trees in Trouble  When the emerald ash borer invaded Cincinnati, thousands of trees died and the city nearly went broke responding to the problem. This film documents the situation in Cincinnati and explores the history of urban forestry, the environmental and social benefits of trees in cities, and the dangers posed by invasive insect species.

Queen of the Sun  Taking us on a journey through the catastrophic disappearance of bees and the mysterious world of the beehive, this engaging and ultimately uplifting film weaves an unusual and dramatic story of the heartfelt struggles of beekeepers, scientists and philosophers from around the world.

Learn more: AV Services on the Web >> library.rrc.ca/av

 

–Posted by Linda Fox, Library Services