Library

Library and Academic Services

News

Truth and Reconciliation Week 2022: Selections from the Library’s Collection

September 22, 2022

RRC Polytech’s fourth annual Truth and Reconciliation Week, with activities scheduled throughout the week of September 26-29, 2022. This event is dedicated to deepening our understanding of Canada’s history, Indigenous cultures, and sparking a conversation around Truth and Reconciliation.

Truth and Reconciliation at Library and Academic Services

Library and Academic Services is actively responsive to Truth and Reconciliation, diversity, inclusion, and equity, through our work, policies, and engagements. One way we do this is by building a collection that is rich in resources about Truth and Reconciliation, Residential Schools, and Indigenous Experiences. Through these books, videos, guides, and other resources, we all have the opportunity to increase our understanding, which leads to healing and strengthened relationships. This week and always, we invite you on a Truth and Reconciliation journey through the Library’s collection!

Guides to Get You Started

screenshot of the residential schools guide

Guides are a great place to start on any topic as they highlight resources hand-selected by Library staff. Of particular interest is our Residential Schools guide.

Noteworthy Books

Below is just a sample of our noteworthy books about Truth and Reconciliation. Click on a book cover to learn more about and request an item.

Outstanding Videos

Both CBC’s Curio.ca and National Film Board offer outstanding videos on this topic. To view a few hand-selected options, click on an image below. (note that login may be required to view online resources).

Questions or Comments?

We welcome questions and comments from the College community! Feel free to connect with us in person at the Notre Dame and Exchange District Campus Libraries or through Ask Us Chat at library.rrc.ca.

Written by Linda Fox – Library Technician, Program Support and Promotion

Truth and Reconciliation at Library and Academic Services 

September 21, 2022

Library and Academic Services is committed to advancing Truth and Reconciliation through awareness, understanding and education. We strive to actively respond to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action and to integrate this dedication in our work, policies, and engagements. In recognition of our ongoing commitment, we’ve compiled a selection of our work towards these priorities as an active report on our progress.  

Our work, along with featured Guides and books from our collections, is now shared on a new webpage at library.rrc.ca/TruthandReconciliation. This page serves as an active report as our commitments are ongoing and continue to develop with time and knowledge.  

Screen Shot

We do not share this information to celebrate ourselves, but to bring awareness to considerations made thus far and to create accountability for what more we can do. Committing to advancing Truth and Reconciliation is an ongoing dedication and we encourage recommendations in how we can further advance understanding and engagement in our programs and services. 

As for the ‘’legwork’ required to compile the collective work from the four units that comprise Library and Academic Services, it was a shared effort. And in this I do celebrate the participation and assistance of everyone involved. It is difficult to take inventory of our actions and thoughts, and to explicitly classify each gesture that was made with diversity and equality in mind. 

For more information on the College’s commitments, please explore the 2022-2026 Strategic Plan as well as the Truth and Reconciliation and Community Engagement 


Written by Sarah Lee – Library Technician, Library Resource Management

How to be an RRC Polytech Library Power User

September 20, 2022

It’s a few weeks into the school year, so it’s time to get to know all the awesome services, spaces and resources the Library offers to help you achieve your academic goals.  

Whether you’re coming into the Library for the first time, you haven’t been to a library in a while, or you’ve never used the library as a post-secondary student, find out all the ways you can be an RRC Polytech Library power user.

1. Find your spot and get comfortable
Use the Library’s spaces when on campus

First, find the Library, and get to know the space. We recently posted a great virtual tour of the NDC Library space, give it a read-through and you may feel more prepared to come in for the first time. Get comfortable using the space to meet your needs; study independently, attend your online classes (using one of the available headsets or webcams), and meet with classmates to work on projects. The Library has two locations, one each at the Notre Dame and the Exchange District campuses, both with great study spots to discover and settle into.

2. Ask Questions!
There are no silly questions, and we offer lots of ways for you to ask them!

Come find us at the front desks in the Library, a Reference Technician is ready to help you figure out anything from printing, finding your way around campus, using the Library website, to getting started with an assignment and better understanding the information resources involved in academic research. Not on campus? You don’t need to come in person, there are lots of ways to connect with the Library! Call us (204) 632-2233. Text us (204) 400-2463, or find us on the Library’s web pages during open hours by clicking the Ask Us bubble to start a chat. After hours? No problem, email library@rrc.ca.

3. Get to know OneSearch
Found on the Library homepage, OneSearch is how to search the Library’s many physical and online resources.

The Library has an ever-expanding digital and physical book and media collection which can be searched using our OneSearch system. If you’ve heard an instructor tell you to search the catalogue or search for articles, this is what they mean.

Getting started is very easy, using searches that resemble how you use google. Once you have started with some search terms and you are viewing the search results, you can take different steps and adjust settings to create more accurate results. Find out more about navigating OneSearch, the basic and advanced search options, as well as the use of Boolean operators and filters to amp up your searches.

4. Find the Guide you need
Starting a research project or program of study and unsure where to get started?

The Library has Guides that can help you, ranging from Guides to your school or programs main subjects, and Guides for specific research topics. There are also Academic guides for writing, and citation styles.

Interested in broader topics and just areas of interest? There are Student Success Guides on topics including intercultural competence, employment Skills, and using Statistics Canada.

Having trouble figuring out how to use a specific database in your research? The Library’s Database Instruction Guides have step-by-step instructions for how to use many of the different databases subscribed to through the Library.

5. Use the right Database
The Library subscribes to different databases that support the colleges many schools and programs.

Available databases range from software tools, searchable collections of codes and standards within an industry, and other reference collections, diagrams, and industry reports.

When looking at the A-Z list of databases, remember that databases marked with the OneSearch icon, are searched collectively when you use OneSearch. Databases missing that icon, need to be searched and used individually.

6. Discover Academic Success Centre supports
Find the Academic Success Centre in the top banner of the Library homepage.

The Academic Success Centre’s services make up a big part of the academic support’s the Library has available to students, and is where students can access a variety of services including:

At the NDC campus, the Academic Success Centre has a new tutoring space called ATLAS – an acronym for Active Tutoring and Learning Achievement Space

Find the Academic Success Centre when entering the NDC Library by taking a right and following the signs for ATLAS.

At EDC you will also find the Academic Success Centre inside the library, when entering through the northern entrance of the Library, the ASC is located through the opening in the wall to the right.

7. Book Equipment before you need it
The Library has an assortment of equipment available from both the Notre Dame and Exchange District Libraries.

Need an adaptor to connect with the projector in a classroom? A camera for a photo or video project? A portable battery charger for your phone? A temporary laptop while your own is being repaired or replaced? A light therapy lamp for working from home on short winter days? All Library equipment can easily be booked online through the Library website, just look for the book equipment icon, or check out the Equipment Borrowing Guide.

8. Use streaming video services
Videos are a great tool in online learning and instruction, and the right videos from the right sources can be cited and used as resources in your academic writing.

The Library’s licensed streaming databases, CBC Curio, National Film Board: Campus, and LinkedIn Learning offer thousands of educational videos, documentaries, and feature films.  

Find out more by checking out our Streaming Video Guide.

9. Export citations and keep them organized with RefWorks
RefWorks streamlines research, data organization, and academic writing by providing an easy-to-use tool for citation, bibliography, and reference management.

RRC Polytech has integrated RefWorks with Office 365, it can easily be accessed and used by students alongside the exportation tools within OneSearch. If you are new to using Refworks, the Library has you covered with our Refworks Guide, and our recorded Lunch and Learn tutorial.

10. Know about academic integrity and how it affects you
Academic integrity hinges on six fundamental values, as defined by the International Center for Academic Integrity: Honesty, Trust, Fairness, Respect, Responsibility, and Courage.

As a critical piece of the learning environment and a fundamental core value of any academic institution, academic integrity directly links the credibility of an institution’s scholarship, research, certificates and diplomas. Academic integrity is essential to ensure students’ investment in their education is protected. To find out more, check out the Academic Integrity Guide for Students.

11. Explore other eLearning resources
The Library website offers many types of online learning resources that you can access and use as study aids, or in your own supplemental learning.

Check out Hybrid LEARNing Modules, a suite of self-directed tutorials housed in LEARN that provides relevant and helpful resources.

The Lunch and Learn program is a series of uploaded video tutorials covering our most popular Library subjects, including OneSearch, Nursing Reference Centre Plus, and APA 7th Edition Citation style.

Find videos and solutions on different math and science topics offered by the Academic Success Centre’s Math and Science Centre.

The Academic Success Centre has compiled the review materials for specific business math and accounting courses into one central location to help you easily access these resources at any time: Business Math & Accounting Review Self-Enroll LEARN Courses

…And finally: Follow the Library on social media
Stay up to date on the latest by following the Library on Social Media!

The Library is on Twitter and Instagram with daily tips, study hacks, events and other great need-to-know information.


Have Questions or Comments?

Library staff love to hear from the College community about our collection! Feel free to connect with us in person at the Notre Dame and Exchange District Campus Libraries or through Ask Us Chat at library.rrc.ca.

Written by Artemis Hedrich – Library Technician, Information and Program Delivery

Honouring International Week of the Deaf: Selections to Read and Watch

September 14, 2022

What is International Week of the Deaf?

International Week of the Deaf takes place September 19-25, 2022, and is an annual opportunity to honour and build awareness of the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing community. This year’s theme is “Building Inclusive Communities for All,” which reminds us to foster connections with and understand the concerns of Deaf people.

The Library honours this occasion with a selection of resources to read and watch, which the RRC Polytech community can learn from and enjoy.

Selections to Read – Print Books

Deaf around the world cover art

Deaf around the world: the impact of language

A compendium of work by scholars and activists on the creation, context, and form of sign languages, and on the social issues and civil rights of Deaf communities.

A journey into the deaf-world cover art

A journey into the deaf-world

A compelling story of this much-misunderstood minority as it struggles for self-determination.

Deaf empowerment cover art

Deaf empowerment: emergence, struggle, and rhetoric

Examines the Deaf social movement in America from its inception in the mid-19th century through its growth and empowerment in the late 20th century.

All of us together cover art

All of us together: the story of inclusion at the Kinzie School

A warm, encouraging testament to the dedication and hard work of the Kinzie teachers and parents. Reading about it is a wonderful, uplifting experience that also could serve as a model for any community.

Access: multiple avenues for deaf people cover art

Access: multiple avenues for deaf people

Presents an accomplished group of contributors who address the major technological, institutional, and societal advances in access for deaf people, as well as the remaining hurdles.

Selections to Read – Ebooks

Signs of hope cover art

Signs of Hope: Deafhearing Family Life

Tells the story of a narrative inquiry with three deafhearing families. For many of us, deafness represents loss and silence. For others, being deaf is a genetic quirk; an opportunity for learning, spiritual adventure and reward. For yet others, it is the most natural thing in the world.

Deaf epistemologies, identity, and learning: a comparative perspective

Noted scholars and researchers examine the many ways that deaf people see and acquire deaf knowledge.

Man without words cover art

A man without words

Vividly conveys the challenge, the frustrations, and the exhilaration of opening the mind of a congenitally deaf person to the concept of language.

sign language sustainable development cover art

Sign language, sustainable development, and equal opportunities: envisioning the future for deaf students

Offers creative and open-minded explorations of the construct of sustainability that are informed by their work with deaf individuals, deaf communities, families of deaf children, and other stakeholders.

Language power and resistance cover art

Language, Power, and Resistance: Mainstreaming Deaf Education

Explores how different types of power are used in the deaf education system to establish, maintain, and also resist medical views of deafness. 

deaf eyes on interpreting cover art

Deaf Eyes on Interpreting

Brings Deaf people to the forefront of the discussions about what constitutes quality interpreting services.

Selections to Watch – Streaming Video and DVD

Through deaf eyes cover art

Through Deaf Eyes [DVD]

Exploring nearly 200 years of Deaf life in America, this film presents the shared experiences of American history–family life, education, work, and community connections–from the perspective of deaf citizens. 

Deafology 101 cover art

Deafology 101: a crash course on deaf culture [Streaming video]

Presents a highly entertaining lecture on deaf culture by Ken Glickman, author of “DEAFinitions” and other humor books.

Note: This video has been digitized from an older VHS master. For best picture quality, set your browser to a smaller window.

Dance of words cover art

The Dance of Words [Streaming video]

Features young artists who have embraced their deaf identity in adulthood after spending a difficult childhood in the grey zone between hearing culture and deaf culture. These emerging artists show how they are using the arts to build a deaf culture that makes them proud. They shine a spotlight on their community while promoting and advancing deaf culture with a keen sensitivity.

Have Questions or Comments?

Library staff love to hear from the College community about our collection! Feel free to connect with us in person at the Notre Dame and Exchange District Campus Libraries or through Ask Us Chat at library.rrc.ca.


Written by Linda Fox – Library Technician, Program Support and Promotion

Assessment Services: Who We Are

September 7, 2022

Services and Supports to Ensure College and Career Readiness

Assessment Services, a subdivision of Library and Academic Services, creates and administers entrance and diagnostic academic testing for College programs to help students determine their overall academic readiness for their program and desired career. They also work with students to help them prepare for College by determining and improving their academic readiness.

This department recently developed from offering admissions and diagnostic testing to incorporating language placement testing, external examinations, distance examinations, and accommodated exams.

In this series of posts, we would like to introduce our multi-faceted team to you, beginning with Admissions, Diagnostic and Placement Testing.

The Admissions, Diagnostic and Placement Testing Team

Yaw Amoah-Gyampoh, Communication Assessor (left), Jordon Zimmerly, Assessment Facilitator (middle); Piers Smettem, Assessment Specialist (right)
Yaw Amoah-Gyampoh, Communication Assessor (left), Jordon Zimmerly, Assessment Facilitator (middle); Piers Smettem, Assessment Specialist (right)

We organize, develop and facilitate admissions testing for a select range of program areas (Health Sciences, Community Services, AME, and international students) and for any application that is missing an academic transcript. We also offer diagnostic testing in collaboration with SIE for Intro to Trades, Compass Skills, and College Transition programs, in addition to offering diagnostic assessments to the Ndinawe organization that supports at-risk youth in Winnipeg. We are also responsible for organizing language placement tests for the Language Training Centre.

Applicants who need to take an admissions assessment as part of their application should visit our resources at our Admissions and Diagnostics website. Here students will find out about helpful resources and preparatory supports that we offer, including pre-program workshops for Community Services led by Yaw, and a tutor-led Degrees of Reading Power workshop.

Stay tuned for the next post in this series, where we’ll introduce you to our Exam Accommodations team.

Written by Piers Smettem, Assessment Specialist

Welcome to our space: a virtual tour of the Notre Dame Campus Library

August 25, 2022

All of the staff at Library and Academic Services are happy to extend a warm welcome to everyone returning to campus. We’re looking forward to providing a safe study space and continuing to offer supports to students and staff, both in-person and online.

Alan Chorney, Manager, Information and Programming Delivery with Library and Academic Services.

Staff and services nearby to help you succeed

For an overview of our free services, stop by in person at ATLAS (Academic Success Centre), the Library Service Desk or visit our website at library.rrc.ca. Library and Academic Services is not just a great place to study, but a supportive team of enthusiastic staff who are here to help you succeed.

Your ideal study space: a virtual tour

Our Notre Dame Campus (NDC) location offers multiple spaces to study. A variety of setups are situated under the skylight, by a window, in a study room, in private carrels, or at tables with whiteboards nearby. Find your ideal study space at the NDC Library!

We look forward to meeting you – online at library.rrc.ca and in person at the Notre Dame or Exchange District Campus Libraries. All the best in your studies at RRC Polytech!

Written by Linda Fox, Library Technician – Program Support and Promotion

Goodbye Stress, Hello Success: 5 Ways to Overcome College Worries

August 22, 2022

Another school year is just around the corner and although it is always an exciting time, it can also be a little stressful! Check out these free resources and supports to help you feel successful and calm throughout your studies.

1. Take advantage of dog therapy

photo of a dog with a person

Studies have shown that spending time around furry friends can boost our mood, lower our stress, and give us a stronger sense of belonging.

Learn more in this online article (RRC Polytech login may be required) >> Putting Away Pre-Exam Stress: The Effect of Therapy Dog Sessions on Student Well-Being

Did you know that Red River Polytechnic has provided therapy dog visits in the past? Read more about it in Campus Well-Being’s newsletter.

2. Know you’re not alone

screenshot of video: Crisis on Campus

Being a student can stir up a lot of negative emotions and for those who already struggle with mental health, it can feel hopeless. High numbers of students seeking help has led academic institutions to provide easily accessible mental health supports to students.

Check out this online video by CBC to learn more (RRC Polytech login may be required) >> Crisis on Campus: Mental Health Demands Surge


3. Set aside time to be mindful

cover art of mindfulness for students

How can mindfulness activities help you be successful while keeping your stress levels at a minimum? Mindfulness for Students provides tips and tricks to better studying, active listening during lectures, and even how to properly prepare for exams. This book is a great tool for your life in and outside of the learning environment.

Learn more and borrow this print book (RRC Polytech ID card required to borrow) >> Mindfulness for Students

Learn about Campus Well-Being’s tips for promoting mindfulness through stretching >> 7 Stretches To Try at Your Desk

4. Spend time outside

cover art of nature rx book

Clinical studies have shown that spending time outside lowers stress and boosts mood. Many colleges are striving to implement programs in which students can spend more time in nature and gain an appreciation of the great outdoors while also lowering the anxiety that can come with the stresses of college.  A great guide for educators wanting to provide opportunities for fresh air in their programs and a great read for students to understand why getting outside is important for your mental well-being.

Read this ebook online (RRC Polytech login may be required) >> Nature Rx: Improving College-Student Mental Health

5. Learn tips for writing success

cover art of how to write better essays

A step-by-step guide which makes the writing process a breeze! Offering suggestions from how to avoid plagiarism, to how to effectively organize your idea, How to Write Better Essays is sure to help you hand papers in with confidence.

Learn more and borrow this print book (RRC Polytech ID card required to borrow) >> How to Write Better Essays

Did you know the Academic Success Centre offers writing support? Learn more by visiting ASC Supports for Students – Writing Centre

Additional free supports offered at RRC Polytech

If you would like to learn more about the mental health supports offered at the College, please explore the following links:

For the full list of student supports, visit www.rrc.ca/supports.

Guest post written by Hilary Ottenbreit, Library Information and Technology student     

Library Support to Increase OER Adoption

August 18, 2022

an instructor teaching a class

Increase Adoption of OER and Electronic Resources: A Key Action for High-Quality Learning

As indicated as a key action of high-quality learning at Red Forum 2022, the Library Team is here to help support instructors in finding high-quality electronic educational resources. The pandemic has blurred the lines between” in-person” learning and “remote” digital classrooms. The RRC Polytech Library is here to support instructors in locating resources that can withstand the need to shift learning environments nimbly.

We invite instructors who may have struggled with format shifts using their current teaching materials, or those who are seeking alternatives to current textbooks, to consider the shift to Open Educational Resources (OER). These are educational materials such as textbooks, problem sets, slide decks, lesson plans, handouts, infographics, and other educational content that can be used for free and without permission.

Advantages of OER

OERs are published under an open license, such as Creative Commons. This allows several key advantages:

  1. Instructors can switch the format of materials with ease and without concern for the violation of copyright, these resources can be printed or remain in digital versions for students.
  2. Instructors can Retain, Reuse, Revise, Remix and Redistribute the materials freely without violating copyright.
  3. OER use allows for cost savings for students when suitable OER can be located to replace course materials students pay for out of pocket.

More Information

Info icon

Learn more about OER as well as past faculty education sessions held over the past two years: visit the Faculty Support OER Page.

See the impact of our current OER use at RRC Polytech in this 2-minute video: OER Impact Video.

Find support at the RRC Polytech Library to get started with OER: contact the Copyright Officer.

Written by Ebony Novakowski – Copyright Officer

Discovering How Faculty Use the Library and Academic Services Website

July 13, 2022

Since we had redesigned the Library and Academic Services website last summer, it was decided that user testing would tell us whether our new site design was effective.

Last fall, we arranged for a small sample of students to review and critique the site. This spring, we decided to do the same using a group of Faculty.

In our site redesign we used principles of user centric design, attempting to create a site for our users, who were defined as two personas: “Average Student User” and “Average Instructor User.”

This particular test targeted instructors, and would evaluate our “Average Instructor User” persona.

Our Academic Support Coordinator, Melissa Coyle, asked for volunteers via Staff News. Not sure how much interest she would generate, she was pleasantly surprised to receive a number of volunteers, all Instructors and EAs, and from different programs and areas of the college. Choosing five candidates that represented an even cross-section of our college, Melissa went ahead and administered a test, one-on-one with each volunteer.

We would like to take a moment to thank the staff who volunteered to take our test. Without you, this entire process would not have been possible. Bravo!

Using a list of twenty-one tasks, consisting of scenarios and questions that could be discovered on the Library and Academic Services website, Melissa monitored the candidates progress in browsing the web pages, taking notes as to the success or failure of the candidate in resolving each task.

It is true that you do not know how easy or hard a designed task might be until you observe an average person attempt to complete it. Melissa did this through a WebEx session with each candidate. It is an ingenious way to conduct a usability test, and Melissa was able to adeptly conduct the testing, all the while taking note of the challenges met by the users.

In case you were not aware, the Library and Academic Services website is quite deep, and contains information on services offered by the Library, Academic Success Centre, and Assessment Services. Some of the tasks were easily resolved by the users, such as:

  • Where would you go to find the hours for NDC and EDC campus?  
  • You are browsing the LAS website and want to ask a Library staff a question. How would you ask a question or request help? 
  • You are an instructor who would like to schedule an in-class Academic Skills workshop for your students. Where would you go to request this workshop?
  • You have a student in your class who you would like to refer for tutoring. What instruction would you provide the student to request or connect with a tutor on their own? 
  • You are looking for information about Copyright, where would you go to find this?

Other questions posed to be more difficult for the users, indicating adjustments may be necessary on the web site:

  • You are an instructor who has assigned a research paper to your students for a specific topic and would like to reserve a selection of books for your class at the Library – how would you do this?
  • You have a student who is unfamiliar with LEARN and struggling to access course materials, submit assignments, and participate in online discussions . You would like to connect them with a tutor for help – how would you do this?
  • You’d like to share some self-directed resources with your students with a focus on study skills. Where would you find these?

Clearly we have more work to do to improve the Library and Academic Services website. In fact, we recognize that a website must be continuously managed, meaning changes are always necessary, and future testing will always be a smart step.

In addition to areas of improvement, the testing has shown us that our process of user-centric design is working. For the most part, we discovered that our Instructor persona was able to use the website to complete the tasks built into the user-interface.

When we build a web site, we think we can do plenty by considering how users will interact with the site. However, until we have some real users try the site, and we watch how they do it, we cannot know the whole story.

So, take our advice. Arrange for a few users to test your web site!

Mark Nelson
Library Systems Specialist
Red River College Polytechnic

Student Registration Now Open for “Get Job Search Ready” Online Workshops with Career Services and ASC

June 23, 2022

The Academic Success Centre (ASC) is partnering with Career Services to provide a comprehensive, interactive workshop series on the development of employment documents and skills for students.   

The series will be a combination of presentations by the Career Services team supported by ASC workshops on complementary topics including: Job Search Strategies and Networking, LinkedIn Profile Development, Resumes and Cover letters, and Interview Strategies. By attending all workshop, students will gain the knowledge and skills they need to succeed with their job search. The series complements Math, Science, and Communication’s (COMM-2172) Communication for the Workplace course.

These workshops will be designed for students in business related programs. All students are welcome to attend and adapt the information to their field. 

Register Now: To register for the workshops, click here to visit the Get Job Search Ready website. 

Access the LEARN Shell: Click here to self-enroll into the Get Job Search Ready Career Services & ASC LEARN shell.

Workshop Overview

July/August Series Date TimeWorkshop Topic
Week 1Mon, July 18th4:00-5:00pmIntroduction to Networking
Week 1Wed, July 20th4:00-5:00pmLinkedIn: Growing and Engaging Your Network
Week 2Mon, July 25th4:00-5:00pmUnderstanding Job Posting Language
Week 2Wed, July 27th4:00-5:00pmPracticing Networking Skills
Week 3Tues, Aug 2nd4:00-5:00pmResumes: What Employers Want
Week 3Wed, Aug 3rd4:00-5:00pmCover Letters: What Employers Want
Week 4Mon, Aug 8th4:00-5:00pmLanguage for Profile and Skill Statements (Resumes)
Week 4Wed, Aug 10th4:00-5:00pmWriting Strong Paragraphs (Cover Letters)
Week 5Mon, Aug 15th4:00-5:00pmInterviews: Strategies for Success
Week 5Wed, Aug 17th4:00-5:00pmInterviews: Answers That Get You Hired
Week 6Mon, Aug 22nd4:00-5:00pmPracticing Strength and Competency-based Interview Questions
Week 6Wed, Aug 24th4:00-5:00pmPracticing Situational Interview Questions

For questions, please contact Rebecca Hiebert at rhiebert30@rrc.ca or Career Services at CareerServices@rrc.ca.