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ePortfolio – Organizing Artifacts in Collections

March 14, 2018

Collections

Collections are groups of artifacts, reflections, presentations, and learning objectives. An item can belong to multiple collections at the same time. For example, you can add a short story you wrote to a collection called “Fiction” as well as a collection called “Creative Writing 101” and there will only be one copy of the story (artifact).

Creating a Collection

    •   Access your ePortfolio 
    •  Click on “New Collection” link

; Click on "New Collection" link

  • Add a Name and if desired Description and Tags to your Collection
  • Click “Save and Close”

Adding Artifacts to a Collection

  • Select the Artifact and click on “Add to Collection”

;Select the Artifact and click on "Add to Collection"

  •  Select the Collections (1) and click Add (2)

; Select the Collections (1) and click Add (2)

Adding Artifacts to a Collection from within the Collection

  • Create or Edit a Collection
  • Click on “Add to Collection” button

; Click on "Add to Collection" button

  • Click on “Artifacts, Presentations, Reflections, or Learning Objectives” edit

; Click on "Artifacts, Presentations, Reflections, or Learning Objectives" edit

  •  Select Artifacts (1) to add to the Collection and click Add (2)

; Select Artifacts (1) to add to the Collection and click Add (2)

Adding Artifacts to a Collection through Tags

This process is especially handy when uploading multiple files that you would like added to the same collection.

  • Create or Edit a Collection
  • Click on “Add to Collection” button

; Click on "Add to Collection" button

  • Click on “Tag List”

; Click on "Tag List" 

  • Create a Tag List Name (1), add Tags to the list (2), and click on “Save” button (3)

;Create a Tag List Name (1), add Tags to the list (2), and click on "Save" button (3)

  • Create, Upload or Edit and Artifact
  • Tag (1) the Artifact with the Tag from the desired Collection Group and Save (2).

;Tag (1) the Artifact with the Tag from the desired Collection Group and Save (2).

Video: ePortfolio – Create and Add Items to a Collection – Learner

Testing for Accessibility

March 12, 2018

Ensuring Accessible Content

There are two ways to ensure your content is accessible: conform to the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) and involve people with disabilities in evaluating and testing your content.

Conforming to WCAG 2.0

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.0) are standards developed by the W3C to assist in the development of accessible digital content. There are a few ways to ensure conformance to WCAG including documentation, checklists, and testing tools.

WCAG 2.0 Documentation

The W3C provides documentation on how to conform to WCAG 2.0 but it is quite extensive and can be overwhelming for beginners.

WCAG 2.0 Checklist

WebAim provides a WCAG 2.0 checklist based on their interpretation of WCAG’s guidelines and success criteria that is easy to follow and a good place to start to learn about what is required to conform to the standard.

Machine Testing using Evaluation Tools

There are many tools that can provide automated accessibility evaluations or audits. These tools can verify conformance to WCAG 2.0 and the level of conformance (A-AAA). These tools are required to assist content developers and designers in identifying errors and providing suggestions for fixes, but they cannot tell you if your web content is actually accessible.

LEARN Accessibility Checker

LEARN has an accessibility checker built in to the HTML Editor that will identify some of the WCAG 2.0 guidelines.

How to use LEARN’s Accessibility Checker

WAVE: Web Accessibility Evaluation Tool

WebAIM’s WAVE is the easiest to use evaluation tool. WAVE is made available as a Chrome extensiona Firefox add-on or online. The online version can be used to evaluate web pages  and the browser plugins can be used to evaluate web pages and LEARN content.

Chrome Extensions

FireFox Add-ons

Web Accessibility Evaluation Tools List

The W3C provides an extensive list of accessibility evaluation tools.

Human Testing

While WCAG conformance can go along way to assisting with making accessible content and evaluation tools can identify errors only humans can really determine whether web content is accessible. To ensure your content is accessible it is recommended that you enlist people with disabilities to test your content. People with disabilities bring their experiences and assistive technologies they use to navigate web content.

Recommended reading

Why accessibility testing with real users is so important

Tips For Conducting Usability Studies With Participants With Disabilities

Virtual Office Hours with WebEx

March 12, 2018

Why Have Virtual Office Hours?

Virtual office hours allow you to meet with students without anyone having to travel. This is ideal for online or blended courses but can also be used for face to face classes to give students another option to get help with their classes.

Virtual office hours can be used for tutoring, information sessions, or quick check-ins with students.

Your Own Personal Meeting Room

With WebEx you have your own meeting room where you can start meetings and invite participants at any time. To get started, log in to WebEx (http://redrivercollege.webex.com), go to My WebEx and then click Start Meeting.

Simply link to your own meeting room (http://redrivercollege.webex.com/meet/username) and students can join whenever you are “in” your virtual meeting room.

Your Own Personal Meeting Room;With WebEx you have your own meeting room where you can start meetings and invite participants at any time. Simply link to your own meeting room (http://redrivercollege.webex.com/meet/username) and students can join whenever you are "in" your virtual meeting room.

Use Live Video to Connect

With WebEx you can use a webcam and microphone to easily connect with your students on a more personal level and get problems solved quicker than with email.

For online and blended classrooms, the live video provides a more personalized experience and increases engagement.

Use Live Video to Connect;With WebEx you can use a webcam and microphone to easily connect with your students on a more personal level and get problems solved quicker than with email. For online and blended classrooms, live video provides a more personalized experience and increases engagement.

Easily Invite Participants

With WebEx you can easily link to your meeting room or invite participants via email. You can also send reminder emails to participants.

Easily Invite Participants;With WebEx you can easily link to your meeting room or invite participants via email. You can also send reminder emails to participants.

Share Your Screen

Share your screen and allow participants to share their screens with you. Sharing your screen allows you to demonstrate software, give feedback on assignments, and troubleshoot problems students may be having.

Annotate your demonstrations and record them for later.

Share Your Screen;Share your screen and allow participants to share their screens to you. Sharing your screen allows you to demonstrate software, give feedback on assignments, and troubleshoot problems students may be having. Annotate your demonstrations and record them for later.

Share Files and Presentations

Quickly share files to students and present PowerPoint files directly within WebEx. Review class material and annotate files for further clarification.

Students can also participate, give them permission to control the presentation, annotate slides, and write on a virtual whiteboard.

Share Files and Presentations;Quickly share files to students and present PowerPoint files directly within WebEx. Review class material and annotate files for further clarification. Students can also participate, give them permission to control the presentation, annotate slides, and write on a virtual whiteboard.

Record for Later

Explaining something multiple times? Record an explanation once and share it with the class.

Record for Later;Explaining something multiple times? Record an explanation once and share it with the class.

For more information on scheduling meetings with WebEx, see the Getting Started with Cisco WebEx Meeting Centre Documentation.

Small Group Meetings Using WebEx

March 12, 2018

Why Use WebEx for Meetings?

You can use WebEx to easily schedule online meetings between co-workers. WebEx runs on almost every device and can support text chat, video conferencing, screen sharing, and audio conferencing.

You can use WebEx to use a shared whiteboard, share files, and show your screen to others for troubleshooting and presentations.

With WebEx, you don’t have to travel for meetings and can conference with many people at once, saving time and money.

Create Meetings Quickly and Easily

With WebEx you have your own personal meeting room (http://redrivercollege.webex.com/meet/username) that you can start any time and can invite anyone to join. No more scheduling meetings and setting up meetings rooms, just start a meeting, invite using email, and go.

Create Meetings Quickly and Easily;With WebEx you have your own personal meeting room (http://redrivercollege.webex.com/meet/username) that you can start any time and can invite anyone to join. No more scheduling meetings and setting up meetings rooms, just start a meeting, invite using email, and go.

Share Your Screen

With WebEx you can share your screen with one click. Perfect for troubleshooting or sharing websites, software, and works in progress.

Share Your Screen;With WebEx you can share your screen with one click. Perfect for troubleshooting or sharing websites, software, and works in progress.

Share Files

Share files to participants and upload PowerPoint presentations to show within WebEx.

Share Files;Share files to participants and upload PowerPoint presentations to show within WebEx.

Easily Invite Participants

Invite participants via email or directly within Outlook with the WebEx productivity tools.

Easily Invite Participants;Invite participants via email or directly within Outlook with the WebEx productivity tools.

For more information on scheduling meetings with WebEx, see the Getting Started with Cisco WebEx Meeting Centre Documentation.

What is the Accessibility for Manitobans Act?

February 15, 2018

Human Rights and Accessibility Laws

The rights of persons with disabilities to be able to live free of discrimination in Canada are enshrined in the Constitution of Canada, and in federal, provincial and territorial human rights legislation, such as the Human Rights Act of Canada and the Manitoba Human Rights Code.

In 2010, Canada ratified the United Nations’ Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) which protects the rights of persons with disabilities by ensuring they are full and equal members of society. The Convention ensures that persons with disabilities have access to the physical environment, to transportation, to information and communications technology, and to other services.

Governments at all levels in Canada are required to implement the Convention. Accessibility laws, along with policies, programs, and services are put in place to meet this requirement .

Canadian Accessibility Laws

Ontario became the first Canadian jurisdiction to enact accessibility legislation with the passing of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) in 2005. Manitoba was the second when the Accessibility for Manitobans Act (AMA) came into law in December 2013. Nova Scotia passed the Nova Scotia Accessibility Act in 2017 and is currently conducting public consultations to inform the development of their accessibility standards.

The Government of Canada conducted public consultations in 2016 and 2017 to inform the development of a federal accessibility act. Legislation is expected to be presented to parliament in spring 2018.

The AMA

The Accessibility for Manitobans Act (AMA)  attempts to ensure people of all abilities have opportunities to full and effective participation in everyday life. The AMA has five standards that address how to identify, remove and prevent barriers in each domain.

The AMA standards:

  • Customer Service
  • Employment
  • Information and Communication
  • Built Environment
  • Transportation

The Customer Service Standard came into effect on November 1, 2015. The deadline for public sector organizations, like Red River College, to comply with the requirements outlined in the standard was November 1, 2017. The standard addresses training, communication, and respectful, barrier-free customer service.

The guides supporting the standard are written in plain language for better understanding of your role in removing barriers and provide ways you can ensure a accessible service.

Customer Service Standard guides:

  • Employers’ Handbook on Accessible Customer Service (PDF) (Word)
  • Tips for Employees on Accessible Customer Service (PDF) (Word)
  • Consumer Guide on Accessible Customer Service (PDF) (Word)

Proposed recommendations for the Employment Standard were recently submitted to the Minister of Families following public consultations and a public review.

Recommendations for the Information and Communication Standard are currently in development. This standard addresses the authoring, design, delivery and procurement of information and communications products, services, systems and environments.

 

Web Accessibility Guidelines

February 15, 2018

Web Accessibility Initiative

The World Wide Web Consortium’s (W3C) Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) was created to  develop guidelines for ensuring web accessibility. These guidelines include the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) and the Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG).

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) are guidelines developed to ensure accessible web and digital content. WCAG is for anyone who is involved in the production of web and digital content, including writers, designers, and developers.

WCAG 2.0

WCAG 2.0 is the current set of guidelines for creating web content. WCAG 2.0 guidelines were developed in 2008 and became an international standard (ISO) in 2012.

WCAG 2.0 applies to web and digital content, including:

  • Web content: Layout, structure, images, navigation, links, tables, instructions, colour, colour contrast, written text
  • Forms: Form elements, buttons, input fields
  • Documents: Word, PDF, Excel
  • Presentations: PowerPoint
  • Time-based media: video, audio, animation, interactives
  • Apps: Content, navigation, usability
  • Social Media
  • Email

WCAG Overview – an introduction to WCAG, supporting technical documents, and educational material

Understanding WCAG 2.0 – A guide to understanding and implementing Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0

WCAG 2.1

WCAG 2.1 is built on and extends WCAG 2.0. It is currently in review and expected to be released in spring 2018.

Understanding WCAG 2.1 – A guide to understanding and implementing Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.1

Silver

Silver is the successor to WCAG. It is currently in early development.

Learn more about Silver

Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines

Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG) are guidelines for developing accessible authoring tools. ATAG 2.0 is the current set of guidelines.

What is in ATAG

  • Making authoring tools accessible for people with disabilities so they can create web content
  • Help authors create more accessible web content

Who ATAG is for:

Developers of:

  • web content authoring tools (HTML editors), learning management systems (LMS), content management systems (CMS), courseware tools, multimedia authoring tools, blogs, wikis, word processors, etc.

Policy makers, managers and others who:

  • Want accessible authoring tools and authoring tools that can produce accessible content
  • Can encourage their existing vendors to improve accessibility in future versions to their authoring tools

Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG) Overview

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines

February 15, 2018

WCAG 2.0

WCAG 2.0 is the current set of guidelines for creating web content. WCAG 2.0 guidelines were developed in 2008 and became an international standard (ISO) in 2012.

WCAG 2.0 applies to web and digital content, including:

  • Web content: Layout, structure, images, navigation, links, tables, instructions, colour, colour contrast, written text
  • Forms: Form elements, buttons, input fields
  • Documents: Word, PDF, Excel
  • Presentations: PowerPoint
  • Time-based media: video, audio, animation, interactives
  • Apps: Content, navigation, usability
  • Social Media
  • Email

Who WCAG is for

WCAG is for anyone who is involved in the production of web and digital content, including writers, designers, and developers.

WCAG Structure

WCAG 2.0 has four principles with 12 guidelines. For each guideline, there are testable success criteria. These success criteria are rated at three levels: A, AA, and AAA.

WCAG struture: Principle, Guideline and Success Criteria

Principles

WCAG 2.0 has four principles:

  • Perceivable
  • Operable
  • Understandable
  • Robust

Perceivable

Illustrations of an eye, ear and hand

Can your audience see, hear and touch your content?

Perceivable has four guidelines:

  • Text Alternatives for non-text content: controls, time based media (audio, video, animation), CAPTCHA alternatives, images, tests and excercises
  • Time-based Media: audio and video, captioning, sign language, media alternatives
  • Adaptable: structure, sequence and presentation of content, content can be rendered in another format
  • Distinguishable: Colour, audio control, contrast, font size, audio, and imeges of text

Operable

An illustration of a speaker, keyboard and a hand pinching

Can your audience operate the interface?

Operable has four guidelines:

  • Keyboard accessible: all functionality can be achieved using only a keyboard (input and control)
  • Enough time: time to complete tasks, adjustable timing, pausing
  • Seizures: avoids three flash threshold that is likely to cause seizure
  • Navigable: able to navigate content and destinations (i.e. links), provide multiple ways to go to a destination

Understandable

An illustration of a head with an arrow pointing to the brain

Can your audience understand your content? Can they use the user interface?

Understandable has three guidelines:

  • Readable: define language of page, limit text column width, avoid centre aligned and justified text, use media (images, illustrations, audio and video) to clarify content, use clearly written content
  • Predictable: present content in a uniform order and provide consistent navigation
  • Input Assistance: reduce errors and support input by helping users understand how to correct an error

Robust

Illustration of a mobile device, laptop and document

Can your audience access your content on their device? Using their assistive technologies?

Robust has one guideline:

  • Compatible: support compatibility with future user agents (software such as browsers and media players) and assistive technologies (AT), avoid deprecated technologies

Resources

WCAG Overview – an introduction to WCAG, supporting technical documents, and educational material

Understanding WCAG 2.0 – A guide to understanding and implementing Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0

Web and Digital Accessibility Resources

February 15, 2018

Web Accessibility Initiative Guidelines

The World Wide Web Consortium’s (W3C) Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) has developed guidelines for ensuring web accessibility. These guidelines includes the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) and the Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG).

Understanding WCAG 2.0 – The current ISO Standard for producing web accessible content.

WebAIM’s WCAG 2.0 Checklist for HTML documents – A checklist for complying with WCAG 2.0 guidelines.

Understanding WCAG 2.1 – WCAG 2.1 is built on and extends WCAG 2.0. It is currently in review.

Silver – successor to WCAG is in development.

Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG) Overview

  • Making authoring tools accessible for people with disabilities so they can create web content
  • Helping authors produce accessible content

Guidelines and Standards

18F Accessibility Guide – United States Government Accessibility Guide

U.S. Web Design System – United States Government Web Accessibility standards

A11Y Style Guide – A living style guide for beginners to experts

Clear Print Accessibility Guidelines –  accessible print guidelines developed by Canadian National Institute of the Blind (CNIB)

Toolkits and Resources

GOV.UK Accessibility blog – UK Government’s accessibility blog covered under Open Government Licence (OGL) and Creative Commons (CC)

Educator’s Accessibility Toolkit – Accessible Campus for universities to meet their obligations of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA)

Accessibility Hub – Queen’s University

Includes:

  • Accessible documents and forms
  • Website accessibility
  • Social Media accessibility
  • Video accessibility

Web and Digital Accessibility articles

Introduction to Web Accessibility – An introduction to web accessibility by WebAIM: Web Accessibility in Mind

Users, Disabilities and Web Accessibility – articles by WebAIM: Web Accessibility in Mind

Accessibility & Me – An introduction to web accessibility

Introduction to Web Accessibility  – Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI), World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)

The A11Y Project – A community-driven effort to make web accessibility easier: How-tos, myths, quick tests, quick tips, Assistive Technology, basics

24 Accessibility – Articles on all subjects related to digital accessibility

7 Principles of Inclusive Design webinar

February 12, 2018

Inclusive Design

Inclusive Design is about putting people first. It’s about designing for the needs of people with permanent, temporary, situational, or changing disabilities — all of us really. In this webinar Henny Swan will introduce the 7 principles and how they can be used alongside standards and guidelines, to take products beyond compliance.

Presenter

Henny Swan is an Accessibility Specialist with over 12 years experience in inclusive design. She is a Senior Accessibility User Experience Specialist at The Paciello Group (TPG) and prior to that worked on cross device media player accessibility at the BBC as well as developing BBC Mobile Accessibility Standards and Guidelines.

The webinar

This webinar is relevant to anyone involved in the design and development of web content and digital environments — instructors, designers, developers, and policy makers responsible for Accessibility for Manitobans Act (AMA) activities.

TLTC and eTV are hosting this webinar on Wednesday, February 21 from 10:15-11:30 a.m. in eTV studio B. Register to attend this webinar.

If you are unable to attend this webinar at eTV or prefer to participate on your own you can register online.

For more information contact Jim Hounslow.

Getting Started with Inclusive Design

February 12, 2018

Inclusive Design Resources

A collection of resources to support the 7 Principles of Inclusive Design webinar.

Articles and Blogs

Inclusive Design Principles – Henny Swan, Ian Pouncey, Heydon Pickering, Léonie Watson, The Paciello Group (TPG)

Inclusive Design Principles and how to use them – Henny Swan, The Paciello Group (TPG)

Women in UX: Meet Henny Swan, Advocate for UX Inclusivity – Henny Swan’s tips for creating more inclusive UX designs

If you want the best design, ask strangers to help – Jutta Trevirans, professor and director, Inclusive Design Research Centre (IRDC), OCADU

IHENI – Henny Swan’s blog

Inclusive Design Research Centre (IDRC)  – OCADU

Video

An Introduction to Inclusive Design – Microsoft Design

Empathy – Microsoft Design

Inclusive Design Principles – Henny Swan : #ID24 2017 – The principles of Inclusive Design, The Paciello Group (TPG)

Henny Swan – The Velvet Rope – #NUX5 – Accessibility and Inclusive Design, The Paciello Group (TPG)

a11yTO Conference – Henny Swan on the principles of Inclusive Design (starts at 34:33)

Toolkits

Microsoft Inclusive Design: toolkit, activities and resources – Microsoft Design

Inclusive Design Toolkit – University of Cambridge

Inclusive Design – Barclays Bank

Posters

Inclusive Design Principles (compressed zip file) – The Paciello Group (TPG)

Inclusive Design Principles single poster – Barclays Bank

Inclusive Design Principles individual posters – Barclays Bank

On Twitter

@paciellogroup – The Paciello Group (TPG), accessibility testing/evaluation, compliance audits, and training.

@iheni – Henny Swan, accessibility specialist, The Paciello Group (TPG)

@LeonieWatson – Léonie Watson, accessibility engineer, The Paciello Group (TPG)

@idrc_ocadu – Inclusive Design Research Centre (IRDC), OCADU

@JuttaTrevira – Jutta Trevirans, professor and director, Inclusive Design Research Centre (IRDC), OCADU