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Veterans’ Week: 5-11 November #CanadaRemembers

November 2, 2018

Veterans know the price paid for our freedom and they want all Canadians to share in this understanding. They are passing the torch of remembrance to us, the people of Canada, to ensure that the memory of their efforts and sacrifices will not die with them, and that an appreciation of the values they fought for will live on in all Canadians.

Reference: http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/remembrance

Canada’s Hundred Days and the Armistice
100th anniversary – 1918-2018

This year, Canada remembers our country’s great contributions and sacrifices in the First World War. Our many achievements on the battlefields of Europe were capped by a three-month stretch of victories at the end of the war – August 8th to November 11th, 1918 – that came to be known as “Canada’s Hundred Days”.

100th Anniversary of Canada’s Hundred Days and the Armistice

The First World War (August 4, 1914 – November 11, 1918)

  • 650,000+ Canadians and Newfoundlanders served
  • 170,000+ wounded
  • 66,000+ dead

Canada’s Hundred Days (August 8 – November 11, 1918)

The last 3 months of Canadian Corps’ victories at the end of the First World War

  • 100,000+ Canadians advanced 130 km
  • 32,000+ prisoners taken
  • 3,750+ artillery pieces, machine guns and mortars captured
  • 39,000+ wounded
  • 6,800+ dead
  • 29 Canadians and 1 Newfoundlander received the Victoria Cross (VC)—the highest award for military valour service members could earn. This represents nearly one-third of all VC’s earned in Canadian history.

Reference: http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/news/info-graphics/hundred-days-armistice

Acts of Remembrance – Social Media

Every year in November, we stop to remember, salute and honour Canada’s Veterans and active duty personnel. This year, we hope that Canadians from coast to coast to coast will join us to pay tribute to our heroes for their service and sacrifice. Let’s start a social media movement that tells our Veterans that #CanadaRemembers.

Posted by Mark Nelson – RRC Library