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Library Equipment Booking is Online!

June 8, 2022

RRC Polytech staff and students can now enjoy hassle-free scheduling with the library’s new online equipment booking system.
Find out everything you need to know about the new booking system so you can plan ahead, and be front of the line for fall bookings!

What’s available?

There are many equipment categories to browse and book online:

Where to go on Library.rrc.ca to book equipment?

You can navigate to the equipment booking system from the library homepage, either by selecting Book Equipment from the icon bar on the homepage, or find it under browse and borrow from on the homepage top menu.


the icon bar from the library.rrc.ca homepage showing the location of the borrow equipment icon.

OR

The top menu bar from the library.rrc.ca homepage showing the location of the Browse & Borrow section.

Where to pick up a booking?

The RRC Polytech Library has two locations, one at the Notre Dame Campus in CM18, and another at the Exchange District Campus in room P214. Our two libraries have different equipment collections, so make sure you select the location you’ll be picking up from, before browsing and setting up bookings.

images of the notre dame and exchange district campus libraries.

Add upcoming bookings to your outlook calendar

When you create a booking, you will receive a “Your booking has been confirmed” email with an .ics calendar file. Open the attachment and add the booking to your calendar.

Graphic showing the steps to open an attached .ics calendar file in the

Make sure to add alerts@mail.libcal.com to your safe senders list so you don’t miss any important updates or reminders about your bookings!

Cancel or Change an upcoming booking

Created a booking you no longer need? Need that equipment for a different time? You can cancel an upcoming booking anytime through the link included in your booking confirmation and reminder emails.

To change a booking, simply reply to your booking confirmation or reminder email and let us know the change, you’ll get an automatic email notification confirming when the changes have been made.

Find out more!

Need some help figuring out how to book equipment? Find out everything you need to know on the book equipment help page.

Curious about the student laptop loan program? Check out the laptop loans terms of use.

Find all the loan periods for equipment on the loan period information page.

Connect with Us!

More information about our services and supports is available on our website. You may also connect with us through Ask Us chat, our Ask a Question form, or visit one of our service desks during regular Library hours.

Written by Artemis Hedrich – Reference Technician

Celebrating Indigenous History Month: Timely New Arrivals

May 26, 2022

A time to honour and learn

June is National Indigenous History Month, a time dedicated to honouring the vibrant history, culture, strength and diversity of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Peoples across Canada. What better time to take advantage of the latest new arrivals in the Library’s Indigenous section?

These timely resources offer the opportunity to broaden your understanding of the experiences and perspectives of Indigenous Peoples. Many thanks to Sarah Lee for maintaining the Library’s Indigenous Collection.

New arrivals to our Indigenous collection

#NotYourPrincess: voices of Native American women / Edited by Lisa Charleyboy and Mary Beth Leatherdale.

Indigenous women across North America resound in this book. #Not Your Princess presents an eclectic collection of poems, essays, interviews, and art that combine to express the experience of being a Native woman. 


Surviving the city / Tasha Spillett; Natasha Donovan.

Tasha Spillet’s graphic-novel debut, Surviving the City, is a story about womanhood, friendship, resilience, and the anguish of a missing loved one. Miikwan and Dez are best friends. Miikwan’s Anishinaabe; Dez is Inninew. Together, the teens navigate the challenges of growing up in an urban landscape – they’re so close, they even completed their Berry Fast together.


Returning to ceremony: spirituality in Manitoba Métis communities / Chantal Fiola.

Returning to Ceremony is the follow-up to Chantal Fiola’s award-winning Rekindling the Sacred Fire and continues her ground-breaking examination of Métis spirituality, debunking stereotypes such as “all Métis people are Catholic,” and “Métis people do not go to ceremonies.”


Me tomorrow: Indigenous views on the future / compiled and edited by Drew Hayden Taylor.

First Nations, Métis and Inuit artists, activists, educators and writers, youth and elders come together to envision Indigenous futures in Canada and around the world. Discussing everything from language renewal to sci-fi, this collection is a powerful and important expression of imagination rooted in social critique, cultural experience, traditional knowledge, activism and the multifaceted experiences of Indigenous people on Turtle Island. 


The Prairie Chicken dance tour / Dawn Dumont.

The hilarious story of an unlikely group of Indigenous dancers who find themselves thrown together on a performance tour of Europe in 1972. The Tour is all prepared. The Prairie Chicken dance troupe is all set for a fifteen-day trek through Europe, performing at festivals and cultural events. But then the performers all come down with the flu. And John Greyeyes, a retired cowboy who hasn’t danced in fifteen years, finds himself abruptly thrust into the position of leading a hastily-assembled group of replacement dancers.


Borders / story by Thomas King; illustration by Natasha Donovan.

A graphic-novel adaptation based on the work of one of Canada’s most revered and bestselling authors. “What side do you come from?” On a trip to visit his older sister, who moved away from the family home to Salt Lake City, a young boy and his mother are posed a simple question with a not so simple answer. And when border guards will not accept their citizenship, mother and son wind up trapped in an all-too-real limbo between nations that do not recognize who they are.


We remember the coming of the white man / editors: Sarah Stewart and Raymond Yakeleya; authors: Walter Blondin [and others].

A work in progress since the 1970s, We Remember the Coming of the White Man chronicles the history of the Dene People in the extraordinary time of the early 20th century. Chapters are transcripts of oral histories of ten Elders.


My privilege, my responsibility: a memoir / Sheila North.

In September 2015, Sheila North was declared the Grand Chief of Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak (MKO), the first woman elected to the position. Known as a “bridge builder”, North is a member of Bunibonibee Cree Nation. North’s work in advocacy journalism, communications, and economic development harnessed her passion for drawing focus to systemic racism faced by Indigenous women and girls. 


We all go back to the land: the who, why, and how of land acknowledgements / Suzanne Keeptwo.

Land Acknowledgements often begin academic conferences, cultural events, government press gatherings, and even hockey games. They are supposed to be an act of Reconciliation between Indigenous people in Canada and non-Indigenous Canadians, but they have become so routine and formulaic that they have sometimes lost meaning. Métis artist and educator Suzanne Keeptwo sees the Land Acknowledgement as an opportunity for Indigenous people in Canada to communicate their worldview to non-Indigenous Canadians–a message founded upon Age Old Wisdom about how to sustain the Land we all want to call home.


Did you see us?: reunion, remembrance, and reclamation at an urban Indian residential school / Survivors of the Assiniboia Residential School ; [edited by Andrew Woolford, Morgan Fontaine, and Theodore Fontaine].

The Assiniboia school is unique within Canada’s Indian Residential School system. It was the first residential high school in Manitoba and one of the only residential schools in Canada to be located in a large urban setting. Stitching together memories of arrival at, day-to-day life within, and departure from the school with a socio-historical reconstruction of the school and its position in both Winnipeg and the larger residential school system, Did You See Us? offers a glimpse of Assiniboia that is not available in the archival records. 


Nothing will be different: a memoir / Tara McGowan-Ross.

A neurotic party girl’s coming-of-age memoir about learning to live before getting ready to die. Tara has it pretty good: a nice job, a writing career, a forgiving boyfriend. She should be happy. Yet Tara can’t stay sober. She’s terrible at monogamy. Even her psychiatrist grows sick of her and stops returning her calls. She spends most of her time putting out social fires, barely pulling things off, and feeling sick and tired. Then, in the autumn following her twenty-seventh birthday, an abnormal lump discovered in her left breast serves as the catalyst for a journey of rigorous self-questioning. 


Dadibaajim: returning home through narrative / Helen Olsen Agger.

Dadibaajim narratives are of and from the land, born from experience and observation. Invoking this critical Anishinaabe methodology for teaching and learning, Helen Agger documents and reclaims the history, identity, and inherent entitlement of the Namegosibii Anishinaabeg to the care, use, and occupation of their Trout Lake homelands. 


Indian in the cabinet: speaking truth to power / Jody Wilson-Raybould.

A compelling political memoir of leadership and speaking truth to power by one of the most inspiring women of her generation. This is the story of why Wilson-Raybould got into federal politics, her experience as an Indigenous leader sitting around the Cabinet table, her proudest achievements, the very public SNC-Lavalin affair, and how she got out and moved forward.


Intimate integration: a history of the Sixties Scoop and the colonization of Indigenous kinship / Allyson D. Stevenson.

Privileging Indigenous voices and experiences, Intimate Integration documents the rise and fall of North American transracial adoption projects, including the Adopt Indian and Métis Project and the Indian Adoption Project. Making profound contributions to the history of settler-colonialism in Canada, it sheds light on the complex reasons behind persistent social inequalities in child welfare.


Di-bayn-di-zi-win: to own ourselves: embodying Ojibway-Anishinabe ways / Jerry Fontaine & Don McCaskill.

An indigenized, de-colonized world view for Indigenous leaders and academics seeking a path to reconciliation. Authors makwa ogimaa (Jerry Fontaine) and ka-pi-ta-aht (Don McCaskill) tell their di-bah-ji-mo-wi-nan (personal stories) to understand the cultural, political, social, and academic events in the past fifty years of Ojibway-Anishinabe resistance in Canada.


These are the stories: memories of a 60s Scoop survivor / Christine Miskonoodinkwe-Smith.

A collection of essays from a 60’s Scoop Survivor.


Home waltz / G.A. Grisenthwaite.

A story of love, heartbreak, and tragedy, Home Waltz delves into suicide, alcohol abuse, body image, and systemic racism. A coming of age story like no other, Home Waltz speaks to one Indigenous teenager’s experience of growing up in a world that doesn’t want or trust him.


Life in the city of dirty water: a memoir of healing / Clayton Thomas-Müller.

An electrifying memoir that braids together the urgent issues of Indigenous rights and environmental policy, from a nationally and internationally recognized activist and survivor. Tying together personal stories of survival that bring the realities of Canada’s First Nations into sharp focus, and lessons learned from a career as a frontline activist committed to addressing environmental injustice at a global scale, Thomas-Müller offers a narrative and vision of healing and responsibility.


Tainna = The unseen ones: short stories / Norma Dunning.

Drawing on both lived experience and cultural memory, Norma Dunning brings together six powerful new short stories centred on modern-day Inuk characters in Tainna. Ranging from homeless to extravagantly wealthy, from spiritual to jaded, young to elderly, and even from alive to deceased, Dunning’s characters are united by shared feelings of alienation, displacement and loneliness resulting from their experiences in southern Canada.


Daughters of the deer / Danielle Daniel.

In this haunting, groundbreaking, historical novel, Danielle Daniel imagines the lives of her ancestors in the Algonquin territories of the 1600s, a story inspired by her family link to a girl murdered near Trois-Rivières in the early days of French settlement.


Sugar Falls : a residential school story / David Robertson; illustratration by Scott Henderson.

From Governor-General’s Award-winning writer David A. Robertson comes this special edition of the timeless graphic novel that introduced the world to the awe-inspiring resilience of Betty Ross, and shared her story of strength, family, and culture.


The trail of Nenaboozhoo and other creation stories / Bomgiizhik; illustrated and edited by Christi Belcourt.

This collection presents legends of Nenaboozhoo, the Ojibway creator spirit, along with other creation stories; sacred stories which were transcribed from the oral storytelling of Isaac Murdoch. The Trail of Nenaboozhoo and Other Creation Stories is a book of art and storytelling that preserve the legends of the Anishinaabe people.


Old Stories, New Ways / Vivian Manasc & Frits Pannekoek.

Through the profound lessons of the seven Grandfather Teachings, architect Vivian Manasc came to understand that the process of planning and designing a building should be a circle, with the beginning and end of the story linked together. The stories Vivian tells in Old Stories, New Ways are also framed by these teachings of Courage, Love, Wisdom, Respect, Truth, Humility and Honesty, with each teaching illuminating an aspect of how working with Dene, Cree, Saulteaux, Métis, Inuit and Inuvialuit communities has influenced her design practice.

Have a comment or question? Connect with the Library!

You may reach us through our Ask Us chat, our Ask a Question form, or visit one of our service desks during regular Library hours. We would love to hear from you!

Written by Linda Fox and Sarah Lee – Library and Academic Services

Supports for Faculty and Staff from Library and Academic Services

May 16, 2022

Planning for Fall? It’s a Great Time to Incorporate Our Supports

Spring is often the time to update course content and plan for fall, and it’s also a great time to incorporate supports offered by Library and Academic Services. In this article, we highlight popular ways we can help you and your students succeed at RRC Polytech. For future reference, we encourage you to bookmark our Faculty Support page which contains links to the complete range of services and supports we offer. 

In-Class Workshops

The Academic Success Centre and Library offer online in-class workshops for student cohorts at the request of faculty. Our suite of workshops includes Academic Skills, Writing Skills, Technology Literacy Skills, Library Instruction, and Copyright.

To request an in-class workshop, please click the links below:

Hybrid LEARNing Modules

The Academic Success Centre and Library have developed a suite of Hybrid LEARNing Modules. The purpose of these modules is to offer learning strategies and resources that faculty can share with their students to further develop foundational skills for success in their studies. The modules feature self-directed tutorials in LEARN and facilitated live sessions via Webex (or MS Teams).

To request a Hybrid LEARNing Module or book a facilitated live session, please fill out this Request Form.

Academic Success Centre

While the ASC is primarily a student service unit, our staff have found that partnerships with faculty are the best way to support students. Partnerships can take many forms, including customized and embedded academic supports in programs, in-class workshops, diagnostic assessments, and the sharing of our learning resources.

To learn more, visit the Academic Success Centre’s Supports for Faculty and Staff page.

Library Collections and Related Services

Suggest a Purchase

The primary purpose of the Library’s collections is to support learning, instruction and research at RRC Polytech. If you have suggestions for a new title or resource to add to our collection, you may fill out the Suggest a Purchase form. Our subject specialists are available to discuss subject area gaps in the collection as well as Open Educational Resources (OER) options with you.  

Guides

The Library’s Guides are curated lists of resources on specialized topics. We can help you find which guides are most relevant for your students or work with you to develop a new Guide to meet your needs. The benefits of Guides are far-reaching for both students and instructors. Below are a few success stories resulting from instructors utilizing Guides.

Guide Success Stories

Environmental Sciences Guide https://library.rrc.ca/enviro-science

Research and Reference Services

Also, you may be looking for information, either for your own research needs, course development, or course readings. Library staff are skilled at locating and referencing information, and it would be a pleasure to assist with that. To connect with a Library staff member, visit us in person or through our Ask Us chat during regular Library hours.

Copyright

Copyright plays an important role when instructors are building content and creating course materials. Our P7 Policy provides guidance around copying but there is also a suite of library-directed copyright services to support and assist faculty in navigating copyright.

The Library’s Copyright Officer supports faculty with the following services:

List of services available from the copyright officer.

You can:

Connect with Us!

More information about our services and supports is available on our website. You may also connect with us through Ask Us chat, our Ask a Question form, or visit one of our service desks during regular Library hours.

Written by Ebony Novakowski, Linda Fox, and Melissa Coyle – Library and Academic Services

Earth Day 2022

April 19, 2022

Earth Day is upon us again on Friday, April 22, 2022.  We have on this day, since 1970, taken to raising awareness about climate change, its increasing effects on our planet caused by our growing carbon footprint, with the knowledge that the more we delay, the more urgent and palpable is the need to address the changing climate. 

COVID-19 is also a new powerful, environmental phenomenon with a unique connection to climate change.  Like the weather, it impacts and disrupts our daily lives, and for the past several years has been a dire presence in our relationships with each other, over the entire globe. 

With these two circumstances affecting us, how will you acknowledge Earth Day this year?  Will you actively participate in recognizing this important and very special day?

Sustainability at Red River College Polytechnic

At Red River College Polytechnic, the Sustainability Office works to promote a culture of sustainability among staff, students and faculty and reduce the College’s impact on the environment.  This year the Office is hosting a Show us your Sustainability! Photo contest.

There are so many ways to support the environment.  From Tuesday April 19 to Friday April 22, send Sustainability a photo of you doing something good for the earth, such as saving energy, reducing waste, or greening your commute and you’ll be entered to win a prize at the end of the week!  Send your photos to Sustainability@RRC.CA.  Follow Sustainability on Facebook (RRC Polytech – Sustainability) or @rrcgoesgreen on Instagram for more details.

Join a virtual presentation of RRC Polytech’s State of Sustainability on Friday April 22 at noon to hear about the sustainability highlights from the past year, the results of a recent survey, and how we at Red River College Polytechnic are measuring our sustainability performance.

RRC Polytech Library Services Resources

Libraries are a tremendous resource for ideas, information, and knowledge.  The libraries at RRC Polytech can assist you on Earth Day in your response to these pressing environmental concerns.  To learn more about why we celebrate Earth Day here are several sources you might consult in your pursuit of understanding of climate change:

Video Collections

Electronic Books

Both for convenience and accessibility, as well as to save on paper, the Library has an extensive collection of eBooks about Climate change

Suggested Primer on Climate Change

“The Fragile Earth tells the story of climate change—its past, present, and future—taking readers from Greenland to the Great Plains, and into both laboratories and rain forests. It features some of the best writing on global warming from the last three decades, including Bill McKibben’s seminal essay “The End of Nature,” the first piece to popularize both the science and politics of climate change for a general audience, and the Pulitzer Prize–winning work of Elizabeth Kolbert, as well as Kathryn Schulz, Dexter Filkins, Jonathan Franzen, Ian Frazier, Eric Klinenberg, and others. The result, in its range, depth, and passion, promises to bring light, and sometimes heat, to the great emergency of our age.”*

[*] The Fragile earth: Writing from The New Yorker on climate change. (2020, October 6). In Goodreads. Retrieved April 11, 2022, from https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/50358071-the-fragile-earth
Available through interlibrary loan or suggest as a purchase.

Need to know more? Ask Us!

NDC and EDC libraries are open during the following limited hours as of April 18, 2022.

NDC

Monday, Wednesday, Friday  8:30am-4:00pm

Tuesday, Thursday  8:30am-8:00 pm 

EDC

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00am-3:00pm

Our online service desk is also available daily to serve you.
Staff are online during the following hours:

Monday, Wednesday, Friday  8:00am – 4:00pm
Tuesday, Thursday  8:00am – 8:00pm

During these times, a staff member is available to chat or answer your email. Simply visit library.rrc.ca and click on the Ask Us button or send an email to library@rrc.ca

Interested in exploring this topic on the Web?

Websites where you will find more current information on climate change:

Other Websites

EARTHDAY.ORG

Manitoba’s Climate Action Team

Manitoba and climate change

Climate Change Action in the Province of Manitoba (International Institute for Sustainable Development)

Prairie Climate Centre

David Suzuki Foundation

Friends of the Earth

World Resources Institute

Green Action Centre

Nature Unlimited

For more links, more electronic & print book reading suggestions, more videos & related topics, check out our Environment Science guide on the Library Service’s website.  And please contact us with your questions and suggestions and let us work with you to make every day an Earth Day.

Written by John Mark Allen, Reference Technician

Freedom to Read Week

February 24, 2022

It’s Freedom to Read Week and libraries across Canada are talking about intellectual freedom.

What is Freedom to Read week about? It’s about protecting intellectual freedom, access to information, and freedom of expression.

This year, Freedom to Read week falls during a time when the persistent controversy in the southern states around LGBTT+ literature is upsurging and making headlines, with many books being challenged, banned, and removed from school libraries. It’s important, even in Canada, to remember that book banning, and the oppression of free expression are not issues of the past, that they are ongoing, global issues.

Please take advantage of the Libraries collections this Freedom to Read Week and celebrate your freedom to express and share ideas with others.


Gender & sexuality : Canadian history through the stories of activists

Gender and Sexuality unearths a diverse spectrum of struggle through the accounts of longstanding activists and social movements participants.

Main Stacks NDC HQ 73.3 .C3 N45 2012

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know about Trans (but Were Afraid to Ask)

Leading activist and essayist Brynn Tannehill tells you everything you ever wanted to know about transgender issues but were afraid to ask.

EBook, Available online

Queer Africa: New and Collected Fiction

Queer Africa is a collection of unapologetic, tangled, tender, funny, bruising and brilliant stories about the many ways in which we love each other on the continent In these unafraid stories of intimacy.

Ebook, Available Online

Out proud : stories of pride, courage, and social justice

Produced in partnership with Egale Canada Human Rights Trust, Out Proud: Stories of Pride, Courage, and Social Justice is the second in a series of essay anthologies designed to give attention to issues that are sometimes ignored in the mainstream media–and a voice to those most closely affected by them.

Main Stacks NDC HQ 73.3 .C3 O88 2014

Prairie fairies : a history of queer communities and people in western Canada, 1930-1985

Prairie Fairies draws upon a wealth of oral, archival, and cultural histories to recover the experiences of queer urban and rural people in the prairies. 

Main Stacks EDC HQ 73.3 .C2 P735 2018
Ebook, Available Online

Trans People in Higher Education

While more trans students, faculty, and staff have come out on US college campuses today than ever before, many still report enduring harassment and discrimination.

Ebook, Available Online

LGBTQAI+ Books for Children and Teens : providing a window for all

This resource gives school librarians, children’s, and YA librarians the guidance and tools they need to confidently share these books with the patrons they support.

Ebook, Available Online


This year the College launched the new Gender and Sexual Identities: Advancing Understanding and Inclusion Training for RRC Polytech employees.

“This self-directed training aims to enhance Red River College Polytechnic employees’ understanding of gender and sexual diversity identities, and provide strategies for advancing inclusion.”

Libraries are responsible to provide and protect access to information, even those ideas and materials considered controversial or distasteful to some. CFLA FCAB Statement on Intellectual Freedom and Libraries

Written by Artemis Hedrich, Reference Technician

Learn About Black History with Library Resources and More!

February 1, 2022

This post originally appeared on February 8, 2021.

February is Black History Month, a time to celebrate the achievements and contributions of Black Canadians through history. They have helped make Canada the culturally diverse, compassionate and prosperous nation it is today. This special compilation of streaming videos and other resources is designed to help you learn more about Black history.

Deeply Rooted

Deeply Rooted cover art

Filmmaker Cazhhmere is a seventh-generation black Canadian. Despite this deep history, she’s constantly asked to explain where she’s from — even though the answer is always “Canada.” Cazhhmere is a proud Canadian. Her ancestors were among the first black settlers to come to Canada — her family has spent hundreds of years weaving itself into the fabric of our nation. Despite this deep history, Cazhhmere is constantly questioned about where she is originally from. In Deeply Rooted, Cazhhmere will change your perception of what a multi-generational Canadian family looks like. In a country that is widely known for being a “global melting pot,” our nation can easily forget that not every person of colour is a newcomer to Canada.

Invisible City 

Invisible city cover art

The film is set in the inner-city housing project of Toronto’s Regent Park; Kendell and Mikey, like their surroundings are in the process of transformation; the environment and social pressures tempting them to make poor choices, their mothers and mentors rooting for them to succeed. Turning his camera on the often-ignored inner city, Academy-award nominated director Hubert Davis sensitively depicts the disconnection of urban poverty and race from the mainstream.

Hardwood

Hardwood cover art

Hardwood is a personal journey by director Hubert Davis, the son of former Harlem Globetrotter Mel Davis, who explores how his father’s decisions affected his life and those of his extended family. Elegantly structured into three chapters entitled “love,” “recollection” and “redemption,” Davis uses personal interviews, archival footage and home movies to delve into his father’s past in the hope of finding a new direction for his own.

Mighty Jerome

Mighty Jerome cover art

In 1959, at just 19, Harry Jerome was Canada’s most promising track and field star on his way to the Olympics in Rome. By 1962, after suffering a gruesome leg injury, there was every reason to think that his racing days were over. But Jerome was not just a champion on the track; he was doubly determined off it. And so began his climb to what his coach, Bill Bowerman, called “the greatest comeback in track and field history.”

The Skin We’re In

Skin we're in cover art

Urgent, controversial and undeniably honest, The Skin We’re In is a wake-up call to complacent Canadians. Racism is here. It is everywhere. It is us and we are it. Following celebrated journalist Desmond Cole as he researches his hotly anticipated book, this documentary from acclaimed director Charles Officer pulls back the curtain on racism in Canada.

Explore Black History on the Web

If you ever have the time and interest in exploring Black history, there are many websites worth checking out. Here you will find a combination of historical images and true stories that bring Black history and culture to life.

Various websites

Canadian Museum for Human Rights Stories

Video Collections from Curio.ca and NFB

Browse the Library’s e-book collection

Browse the e-book collection: Black History

Have a question or suggestion? Connect with us!

To connect with us through our online service desk, simply visit library.rrc.ca and click on the Ask Us button. We’d love to hear from you!

Follow us on social media!

For everything from fun series to service and programming updates, follow us on social media. We’re active on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

Written by Linda Fox – Library Technician, Program Support and Promotion

Winter Break Reading

December 14, 2021

With the upcoming Winter Break, hopefully we can all have some downtime to relax! If the weather cooperates, we can enjoy some fresh air activities like walking, skating, or skiing. Once back inside, curling up with a good book and a hot drink will warm us up!

RRC Polytech Library has many great choices of award-winning books (and short-list finalists) in our collection. Here is just a sampling of some of those titles.

Washington Black by Esi Edugyan

Winner of the Scotiabank Giller Prize for fiction, 2018

Book Cover Washington BlackWhen two English brothers arrive at a Barbados sugar plantation, they bring with them a darkness beyond what the slaves have already known. Washington Black – an eleven year-old field slave – is horrified to find himself chosen to live in the quarters of one of these men. But the man is not as Washington expects him to be. His new master is the eccentric Christopher Wilde – naturalist, explorer, inventor and abolitionist – whose obsession to perfect a winged flying machine disturbs all who know him. Washington is initiated into a world of wonder: a world where the night sea is set alight with fields of jellyfish, where a simple cloth canopy can propel a man across the sky, where even a boy born in chains may embrace a life of dignity and meaning – and where two people, separated by an impossible divide, can begin to see each other as human.

How to Pronounce Knife: Stories by Souvankham Thammavongsa

Winner of the Scotiabank Giller Prize for fiction, 2020

 Book Cover How to Pronounce KnifeHow to Pronounce Knife is a stunning collection of stories that portray the immigrant experience in achingly beautiful prose. The emotional expanse chronicled in this collection is truly remarkable. These stories are vessels of hope, of hurt, of rejection, of loss and of finding one’s footing in a new and strange land. Thammavongsa’s fiction cuts to the core of the immigrant reality like a knife—however you pronounce it.

 

 

 

 

The Glass Hotel by Emily St. John Mandel

Shortlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, 2020

From the award-winning author of Station Eleven, a captivating novel of money, beauty, white-collar crime, ghosts and moral compromise in which a woman disappears from a container ship off the coast of Mauritania and a massive Ponzi scheme implodes in New York, dragging countless fortunes with it. Vincent is a bartender at the Hotel Caiette, a five-star glass-and-cedar palace on the northernmost tip of Vancouver Island. New York financier Jonathan Alkaitis owns the hotel. When he passes Vincent his card with a tip, it’s the beginning of their life together. That same day, a hooded figure scrawls a note on the windowed wall of the hotel: “Why don’t you swallow broken glass.” Leon Prevant, a shipping executive for a company called Neptune-Avramidis, sees the note from the hotel bar and is shaken to his core. Thirteen years later, Vincent mysteriously disappears from the deck of a Neptune-Avramidis ship. Weaving together the lives of these characters, The Glass Hotel moves between the ship, the skyscrapers of Manhattan and the wilderness of remote British Columbia, painting a breathtaking picture of greed and guilt, fantasy and delusion, art and the ghosts of our pasts.

Son of a Trickster by Eden Robinson

Shortlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize 2017

Book cover Son of a TricksterEveryone knows a guy like Jared: the burnout kid in high school who sells weed cookies and has a scary mom who’s often wasted and wielding some kind of weapon. Jared does smoke and drink too much, and he does make the best cookies in town, and his mom is a mess, but he’s also a kid who has an immense capacity for compassion and an impulse to watch over people more than twice his age, and he can’t rely on anyone for consistent love and support, except for his flatulent pit bull, Baby Killer (he calls her Baby)–and now she’s dead. Jared can’t count on his mom to stay sober and stick around to take care of him. He can’t rely on his dad to pay the bills and support his new wife and step-daughter. Jared is only sixteen but feels like he is the one who must stabilize his family’s life, even look out for his elderly neighbours. But he struggles to keep everything afloat … and sometimes he blacks out. And he puzzles over why his maternal grandmother has never liked him, why she says he’s the son of a trickster, that he isn’t human. Mind you, ravens speak to him–even when he’s not stoned. You think you know Jared, but you don’t.

From the Ashes: my story of being Métis, Homeless, and Finding My Way
by Jesse Thistle

Indigenous Voices Award winner, 2020
Canada Reads contender, 2020

Book Cover From the AshesFrom the Ashes is a remarkable memoir about hope and resilience, and a revelatory look into the life of a Métis-Cree man who refused to give up. Abandoned by his parents as a toddler, Jesse Thistle briefly found himself in the foster-care system with his two brothers, cut off from all they had known. Eventually the children landed in the home of their paternal grandparents, but their tough-love attitudes meant conflicts became commonplace. And the ghost of Jesse’s drug-addicted father haunted the halls of the house and the memories of every family member. Struggling, Jesse succumbed to a self-destructive cycle of drug and alcohol addiction and petty crime, spending more than a decade on and off the streets, often homeless. One day, he finally realized he would die unless he turned his life around. In this heartwarming and heartbreaking memoir, Jesse Thistle writes honestly and fearlessly about his painful experiences with abuse, uncovering the truth about his parents, and how he found his way back into the circle of his Indigenous culture and family through education. An eloquent exploration of what it means to live in a world surrounded by prejudice and racism and to be cast adrift, From the Ashes is, in the end, about how love and support can help one find happiness despite the odds.

Injichaag : My Soul in Story : Anishinaabe Poetics in Art and Words by Rene Meshake (ebook)

Winner of Indigenous Voices Award for Works in an Indigenous Language, 2020

Book Cover my soul in storyThis book shares the life story of Anishinaabe artist Rene Meshake in stories, poetry, and Anishinaabemowin “word bundles” that serve as a dictionary of Ojibwe poetics. Meshake was born in the railway town of Nakina in northwestern Ontario in 1948, and spent his early years living off-reserve with his grandmother in a matriarchal land-based community he calls Pagwashing. He was raised through his grandmother’s “bush university,” periodically attending Indian day school, but at the age of ten Rene was scooped into the Indian residential school system, where he suffered sexual abuse as well as the loss of language and connection to family and community. This residential school experience was lifechanging, as it suffocated his artistic expression and resulted in decades of struggle and healing. Now in his twenty-eighth year of sobriety, Rene is a successful multidisciplinary artist, musician and writer. Meshake’s artistic vision and poetic lens provide a unique telling of a story of colonization and recovery. The material is organized thematically around a series of Meshake’s paintings. It is framed by Kim Anderson, Rene’s Odaanisan (adopted daughter), a scholar of oral history who has worked with Meshake for two decades. Full of teachings that give a glimpse of traditional Anishinaabek lifeways and worldviews, Injichaag: My Soul in Story is “more than a memoir.”

Five Wives: a novel by Joan Thomas

Winner of the Governor General’s Literary Award for English Language Fiction, 2019

Book cover Five WivesIn 1956, a small group of evangelical Christian missionaries and their families journeyed to the rainforest in Ecuador intending to convert the Waorani, a people who had never had contact with the outside world. The plan was known as Operation Auca. After spending days dropping gifts from an aircraft, the five men in the party rashly entered the “intangible zone.” They were all killed, leaving their wives and children to fend for themselves.
Five Wives is the fictionalized account of the real-life women who were left behind, and their struggles – with grief, with doubt, and with each other – as they continued to pursue their evangelical mission in the face of the explosion of fame that followed their husbands’ deaths.
Five Wives is a riveting, often wrenching story of evangelism and its legacy, teeming with atmosphere and compelling characters and rich in emotional impact.

When We Were Alone by David Robertson, illustrated by Julie Flett

Winner of Governor General’s Literary Award, Young People’s Literature (Illustrated Books), 2017

Book Cover When we were aloneWhen a young girl helps tend to her grandmother’s garden, she begins to notice things that make her curious. Why does her grandmother have long, braided hair and beautifully colored clothing? Why does she speak another language and spend so much time with her family? As she asks her grandmother about these things, she is told about life in a residential school a long time ago, where all of these things were taken away. When We Were Alone is a story about a difficult time in history, and, ultimately, one of empowerment and strength.

National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, September 30

September 16, 2021

September 30, National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. A day for reflections and conversations about residential schools and their imapcts.

We respectfully acknowledge that Red River College campuses are located on the original Lands of the Anishinaabeg, Cree, Oji-Cree, Dakota, and Dene peoples, and on the homeland of the Métis Nation.

In June 2021 the Federal Government of Canada passed legislation to make September 30th a federal statuary holiday as the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. This day provides the opportunity to recognize the legacy of the Canadian Residential School Systems. Undoubtedly before this federal legislation, September 30th has been recognized and observed as Orange Shirt Day or as Every Child Matters throughout Canada to recognize the victims of the Canadian Residential School System, and in support of Truth and Reconciliation. Library and Academic Services staff are honoured and eager to show our continued support for Truth and Reconciliation.

This past year has ignited national attention towards Truth and Reconciliation after the unmarked graves of 215 children were found near a former Residential School in Kamloops, BC. This number soon increased to over 1300 across Canada as more former Residential School sites across Canada were investigated. With these discoveries, it seemed Residential Schools and Truth and Reconciliation became pertinent conversations in our households and global environment. However, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRCC) was formed in June 2008, releasing its final reports and the 94 Calls to Action in 2015, and has been a pertinent conversation for a long time.

The unsettling news from Summer 2021 was a reminder that the past cannot be forgotten and that education about the truth is the way forward.

Library Resources: Helpful Starting Points to Build Your Understanding of Truth and Reconciliation

Our library contains many resources about Truth and Reconciliation, Residential Schools, and Indigenous Experiences throughout its’ collections. These resources are helpful starting points towards building understanding of Truth and Reconciliation in Canada. We invite you to look at some of these resources to acquaint yourself with Truth and Reconciliation.

Guides

Guides like Residential Schools and Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls highlight books, videos, articles, and websites that help build understanding and educate about these issues.

Books

Books that are available from the library include:  

Videos

We also have streaming videos available through our collections. Video Databases like Curio have collections like Beyond 94: Truth and Reconciliation in Canada and Residential Schools: A Sad Chapter in Canadian History.

Videos you might consider to learn more about Canadian Truth and Reconciliation include:

Truth and Reconciliation at Red River College

grass field and sunset. Text reads: Truth and reconciliation week 2021. Sept 27 - Oct 1

Red River College is hosting its third annual Truth and Reconciliation Week virtually from September 27 to October 1, 2021. The week is dedicated to deepening our understanding of Canada’s history, Indigenous cultures, and sparking a conversation around Truth and Reconciliation.

We also encourage visiting Indigenous Education’s Truth and Reconciliation and Community Engagement to learn more about Indigenous Events and Initiatives at Red River College and its communities.

Written by Sarah Lee, Library Resource Management Technician

June is National Indigenous History Month

May 31, 2021

The month of June is National Indigenous History Month — a time for all Canadians to celebrate and appreciate the unique histories, cultures, and contributions of First Nations, Inuit, and Metis people. It is one way to honour Indigenous Peoples’ role in shaping Canadian history and their contributions to protecting democracy. It is also key to recognizing their identity and spirit, which is inherently connected to the land.

In cooperation with Indigenous organizations, the Government of Canada designated June 21, the summer solstice, National Indigenous Peoples Day. For generations, many Indigenous peoples and communities have celebrated their culture and heritage on or near this day.

Due to the seriousness of the COVID-19 crisis, the Government of Canada invites Canadians to celebrate this year’s National Indigenous History Month and National Indigenous Peoples Day from home. Keep yourself, your family and your community safe by following instructions from health officials and other trusted, reliable sources.  (Reference: rcaanc-cirnac.gc.ca)

On the Canadian government website you are invited to learn more about the unique heritage, diverse cultures and outstanding contributions of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples by visiting Celebrating National Indigenous History Month, or by reading a digital copy of one of the books from the #IndigenousReads reading list.

The Red River College Library also invites college students and staff to explore the resources listed below. (College login required)

Learn About Indigenous History and Culture Through Films and Books

Catch a glimpse of the richness and breadth of Indigenous culture, diversity, and history through these hand-selected resources. We encourage you to explore the Library’s collection further with our OneSearch tool.

Indigenous Storytelling (eBooks)

Cover art - books about storytelling

kisiskaciwan: Indigenous Voices from Where the River Flows Swiftly 

A ground-breaking anthology from the territory now known as Saskatchewan, this book explores some of the richest and oldest stories from these lands, including voices from Cree, Saulteaux, Dakota, Lakota, Nakota, Dene, and Metis nations.

Centering Anishinaabeg Studies : Understanding the World Through Stories

Written by Anishinaabeg and non-Anishinaabeg scholars, storytellers, and activists, these essays draw upon the power of cultural expression to illustrate active and ongoing senses of Anishinaabeg life.

Coyote and Raven Go Canoeing : Coming Home to the Village

In a gesture toward traditional First Nations orality, Peter Cole blends poetic and dramatic voices with storytelling. A conversation between two tricksters, Coyote and Raven, and the colonized and the colonizers, his narrative takes the form of a canoe journey. It is a celebration of Aboriginal thought, spirituality, and practice, a sharing of lived experience as First Peoples.

Testimonial Uncanny, The : Indigenous Storytelling, Knowledge, and Reparative Practices

Through the study of Indigenous literary and artistic practices from Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the United States, Julia V. Emberley examines the ways Indigenous storytelling discloses and repairs the traumatic impact of social violence in settler colonial nations.

Indigenous Fiction

Song of Batoche

This historical novel reimagines the North-West resistance of 1885 through the Métis women of Batoche, and in particular the rebellious outsider, Josette Lavoie.

Dancing Home

Blackie is out for revenge against the cop who put him in prison on false grounds. He is also craving to reconnect with his grandmother’s country. Driven by his hunger for drugs and payback, Blackie reaches dark places of both mystery and beauty as he searches for peace.

Yellow Line

Vince lives in a small town—a town that is divided right down the middle by race. The unspoken rule has been there as long as Vince remembers and no one challenges it. But when Vince’s friend Sherry starts seeing an Indigenous boy, Vince is outraged—until he notices Raedawn, a girl from the reserve. Trying to balance his community’s prejudices with his shifting alliances, Vince is forced to take a stand, and see where his heart will lead him.

Indigenous Culinary Arts

Where People Feast : An Indigenous People’s Cookbook

Where People Feast, one of very few indigenous cookbooks available, is the culmination of a lifetime dedicated to introducing people to extraordinary foods that are truly North American.

Good Seeds : A Menominee Indian Food Memoir

In this food memoir, named for the manoomin or wild rice that also gives the Menominee tribe its name, tribal member Thomas Pecore Weso takes readers on a cook’s journey through Wisconsin’s northern woods. He connects each food—beaver, trout, blackberry, wild rice, maple sugar, partridge—with colorful individuals who taught him Indigenous values.

A Feast for All Seasons : Traditional Native Peoples’ Cuisine

Traditional Native recipes featuring products from the land, sea and sky, symbols of an enduring cuisine that illustrate respect for the nurturing land, and acknowledgment of the spiritual power food can have in our lives.

Streaming Videos

Holy Angels

Holy Angels

National Film Board of Canada – 2017 | 13 min

In 1963, Lena Wandering Spirit became one of the more than 150,000 Indigenous children who were removed from their families and sent to residential school. Jay Cardinal Villeneuve’s short documentary Holy Angels powerfully recaptures Canada’s colonialist history through impressionistic images and the fragmented language of a child. Villeneuve met Lena through his work as a videographer with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Filmed with a fierce determination to not only uncover history but move past it, Holy Angels speaks of the resilience of a people who have found ways of healing—and of coming home again.

We Were Children

we were children

National Film Board of Canada – 2012 | 1 h 23 min

In this feature film, the profound impact of the Canadian government’s residential school system is conveyed through the eyes of two children who were forced to face hardships beyond their years. As young children, Lyna and Glen were taken from their homes and placed in church-run boarding schools, where they suffered years of physical, sexual and emotional abuse, the effects of which persist in their adult lives. We Were Children gives voice to a national tragedy and demonstrates the incredible resilience of the human spirit.

Four Faces of the Moon

Screenshot

Four Faces of the Moon on Curio.ca | 2016 | 13 min

Follows the animated journey of an Indigenous photographer as she travels through time. She witnesses moments in her family’s history and strengthens her connection to her Métis, Cree and Anishnaabe ancestors. This is a personal story, told in four chapters through the eyes of director and writer Amanda Strong.

Karihwanoron : Precious Things

Screenshot

Karihwanoron: Precious Things on Curio.ca | 2017 | 14 min

A small community bands together around a Mohawk immersion school they founded to keep their language alive. Karihwanoron is a Mohawk immersion program that teaches Mohawk language, culture and philosophy. Unfortunately, this year, the school is at risk of having to close its doors. Permanently.

nîpawistamâsowin: We Will Stand Up

Cover art

nîpawistamâsowin: We Will Stand Up on NFB Campus | 2019 | 1 h 38 min

Weaves a profound narrative encompassing the filmmaker’s own adoption, the stark history of colonialism on the Prairies, and a vision of a future where Indigenous children can live safely on their homelands.

Now Is the Time

Screenshot

Now Is the Time on NFB Campus | 2019 | 16 min

When internationally renowned Haida carver Robert Davidson was only 22 years old, he carved the first new totem pole on British Columbia’s Haida Gwaii in almost a century. On the 50th anniversary of the pole’s raising, Haida filmmaker Christopher Auchter steps easily through history to revisit that day in August 1969, when the entire village of Old Massett gathered to celebrate the event that would signal the rebirth of the Haida spirit.

Explore Further with the Library’s Indigenous Guides

Delve further into Indigenous subjects with the Indigenous Education guides. Subject-specific collections on the following topics:

Mental Health Week, May 3 – 9, 2021

May 3, 2021

What is Mental Health Week?  Why do we need a week to focus on this?  I don’t have mental health problems, so why make a big deal out of it?

All good questions with some very important answers.

Mental Health Week helps to break a long-standing veil of secrecy about this important part of our lives.  Talking about mental health destigmatizes it and brings awareness to the fact that no one is immune to mental health issues, be they short or long term, mild or debilitating and that yes, there are resources and treatments available.  In short, this week endeavors to provide information, increase awareness, end stigma and promote treatment.

Mental Health Week Get Real bannerThe Canadian Mental Health Association’s 2021 theme is “#GetReal about how you feel. Name it, don’t numb it”, and in this time of Covid-19, mental health is increasingly being talked about.  We are more anxious, isolated and lonely, and more unsure of the future.  It’s important to give names to our feelings and emotions; the good ones and the difficult and challenging ones too.  Naming your emotions is the first step in dealing with them and recognizing they are normal and we all deal with them.

Mental Health Supports at RRC

Red River College has supports available.  These include the Healthy Minds Healthy College initiative, Mindfulness training through the MindWell platform, Counselling Services, College Athletics programs, an Employee and Family Assistance Program, Mental Health Workshops for students, and more.

RRC Library has many valuable resources also, such as a guide about the Healthy Minds, Healthy College initiative which contains links to print and electronic books, videos and relevant external websites. We also have Light Therapy lamps available to borrow, to combat Seasonal Affective Disorder.

Selected Resources

Below are just two of our many print and electronic resources; please email library@rrc.ca for more resources, or contact us via our Online Chat Service available on our Library Homepage.

                                

Everyday self-care for educators : tools and strategies for well-being

Tantillo Philibert, C., Soto, C., & Veon, L. (2020). Everyday self-care for educators : tools and strategies for well-being. New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.

What to do when college is not the best time of your life

Leibow, D., & Leibow, D. (2010). What to do when college is not the best time of your life. New York: Columbia University Press. https://doi.org/10.7312/leib15174

How is your mental health? If you have concerns remember, help is available and you are not alone.