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Indigenous Education

News and Events

Elders-in-Residence Cultural Centre Schedule October – December 2021

October 12, 2021

Spend time with Elder Paul Guimond and Ms. Una Swan as they host virtual drop-in centres, workshops, teachings, as well as open their door for in-person appointments.

Activities and schedule subject to change and in response to special College-wide events and holidays. Virtual sessions will be hosted via Microsoft Teams. This schedule runs until December 17, 2021.

Connect on Teams!

Students and staff can join the new Elder’s Microsoft Teams site to easily access events, add them to your calendar, and receive notifications. Virtual events and workshops will be hosted via Microsoft Teams.

To join, use code: l317iay
(Select Teams in the side bar of Microsoft Teams (right below chats), click join team in the top right corner, enter the code.)

Meet our new Navigation Coaches!

October 7, 2021

We are proud to welcome Sarah Heald and Terri-Lynn Anderson as our new Navigation Coaches as part our Indigenous Student Supports team. Both bring their own extensive experiences to support Indigenous students on their learning journey.

Sarah Heald

Navigation Coaches are a first point of contact for current Indigenous students and can help with everything from finding your way around campus, problem-solving, sharing important resources and information, understanding College processes and accessing community services. They will also help connect you with other important support team members, who together, can ensure you receive the help you need.

Terri-Lynn Anderson

Sarah Heald is part of the Bear Clan and her Spirt name is White Pine Earth Woman. Born and raised in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Sarah is a member of Lac Seul First Nation in Treaty 3 Territory.

Terri-Lynn Anderson is a proud, Métis woman and mother of four. Her passion is to continue helping Indigenous students become successful in their post-secondary studies and future careers.

Click here to learn more about Sarah and Terri-Lynn.

National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

September 29, 2021

Content Warning: Residential Schools

Tomorrow, September 30, is a day we’ve come to know as Orange Shirt Day, a day that encourages conversation and education on all aspects of Residential Schools. It is an opportunity to create meaningful discussion about the intergenerational effects of Residential Schools and the legacy they have left behind that affect us all.

This movement was sparked by the story of Phyllis Webstad from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation. Phyllis was proud to wear the orange shirt her grandmother gifted to her for her first day of Residential School. The shirt was taken from her and she never saw it again. Phyllis represents the 150,000 First Nations, Inuit, and Métis children who were forcibly removed from their homes and families and taken to Residential Schools. 

September 30 has now been declared as the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation by the federal government, and so the College will be closed tomorrow; giving us all an opportunity to listen, learn, reflect, and honour the victims and survivors of the Residential School System. As the College is closed tomorrow, we have invited staff and students to wear orange today as a symbol of recognition and support.

The work of reconciliation has just begun, and it’s important for all living on Turtle Island to know, understand and have respect for the truth before real change can take effect.

Tomorrow, there are events and activities you can take part in your community or online from many organizations including the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation. You can also explore resources on our website rrc.ca/trc, including the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Actions, the Library and Academic Services Resources’ National Day for Truth and Reconciliation Book & Video Guide. You can also listen to Indigenous peoples and influencers online and share their content as well as talk to your friends and family about reconciliation and share what you have learned.

This day may be difficult for some, and we want to remind you to take care of yourself and take care of each other. Please don’t hesitate to reach out to those you trust, or to one of the supports we’ve listed below.

You can be a supportive alley by respecting boundaries as many Indigenous peoples experience this trauma and pain.

Supports and Resources:

National Indian Residential School Crisis Line 1-866-925-4419

Klinic Crisis line 204-786-8686 or toll free 1-888-322-3019

RRC student supports:

Counselling: rrc.ca/counselling

Mental Health Coordinator: rrc.ca/wellness/contact/

Elders in Residence: rrc.ca/staff/resources/indigenous-supports/  

RRC Staff: Employee Family Assistance Plan: rrc.ca/staff/resources/healthy-minds-healthy-college/supports/

Self-Care Suggestions:

 *   Call a friend you trust

 *   Go for a walk outside, exercise, do some light yoga, or move your body in a way that feels accessible to you

 *   Ensure you are getting good sleep and nutrition

 *   Connect with your culture, smudge

 *   Do a mindful meditation (find online)

 *   Have a warm bath or shower

Truth and Reconciliation Week 2021 will continue on Friday, October 1st with two live events. Click here to learn more and access events.

Happy Fall Equinox

September 22, 2021

Fall Equinox has always been a significant and ceremonial time of year as we enter into equal part day and night and a new phase of the year. Just like us, Aki (earth in Ojibwe), and all its inhabitants, is preparing itself to get ready for winter. Gardens are giving their final gifts, leaves are falling, animals are changing colour, and the beautiful harvest moon provides extra light so we can prepare to move into a colder, restful season. It’s a season of preparation of what’s to come.

Fall Equinox also leads into why we recognize September 30 as Orange Shirt Day, which has now been declared as the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, as the time of year when Indigenous children were taken forcibly from their families to Residential Schools.
Next week is our third annual Truth and Reconciliation Week where special guests will join us to share their stories and knowledge on Residential Schools, treaties, anti-racism, intergenerational trauma, and healing.

As the College will be closed on September 30, staff and students are invited to wear orange on Wednesday, September 29.

Check out the Truth and Reconciliation Week 2021 Schedule

September 16, 2021

Red River College’s third annual Truth and Reconciliation Week, September 27 – October 1, 2021, is dedicated to deepening our understanding of Canada’s history, Indigenous cultures, and sparking a conversation around Truth and Reconciliation.

During the week, you will hear from Indigenous voices, engage in the conversation, as well as participate in some interactive activities. Some of the themes we will be touching on this year include anti-racism, Every Child Matters, the Canadian Residential School System, intergenerational trauma, healing, and strength.

Join the TRC Week Microsoft Teams site to easily access events and resources, receive notifications on and join the conversation! Live events will be hosted via Microsoft Teams for ease of use.

There will be a few different channels for you to explore, including channels hosted by the Student’s Association, the Academic Success Centre, and the Library.

To join, use code: z3znhh2

Material Handling 4.0 Information Session

September 10, 2021

Learn more about this new FREE six-week pilot program for Indigenous students so you can start a job in warehousing and distribution! Get job-ready skills, receive a micro-credential and employment services, plus a two-week paid placement. The program builds on the successful training model used by Mohawk College’s City School in Hamilton, Ont.

Material Handling 4.0 Information Session
NEW DATE ADDED: Tuesday, September 21, 2021 – 1:00 pm

No need to register. Click to join to launch WebEx virtual event.
Event password:  RRC2021

For program details, visit rrc.ca/indigenous/materials-handling-4-0

Save the Date: Truth and Reconciliation Week 2021

August 13, 2021

You’re invited to participate in Red River College’s third annual Truth and Reconciliation Week, September 27 – October 1, 2021.

The week is dedicated to deepening our understanding of Canada’s history, Indigenous cultures, and sparking a conversation around Truth and Reconciliation.

During the week, you will have opportunities to hear Indigenous voices, engage in the conversation, as well as participate in some interactive activities. Some of the themes we will be touching on this year include Every Child Matters, the Canadian Residential School System, intergenerational trauma, healing, and strength.

All are welcome to participate in special events and join the conversation. As you participate in this week’s events strong emotions may arise. Be sure to take breaks and practice good self-care. Remember to be kind and do check-ins with yourself. We will share more ways you can do this as we get closer to events, but you can always access RRC Mental Health supports and resources at rrc.ca/wellness

New training launched for goods movement and supply chain sectors

July 20, 2021

FREE SIX-WEEK PILOT PROGRAM OFFERS SOUGHT-AFTER CERTIFICATION FOR CAREERS IN WAREHOUSES OR DISTRIBUTION CENTRES

Are you ready to prepare for in-demand career opportunities in warehousing and distribution?

Red River College is launching a new six-week Material Handling 4.0 pilot program that provides industry-driven training, individualized student supports and hands-on work experience to those who face barriers to employment and education.

Participants will also enhance their soft skills, and be provided a full slate of wraparound supports, including opportunities for child care, all required personal protective equipment and supplies for work safety, and referrals to support services such as legal clinics, housing and health care.

The program builds on the successful training model used by Mohawk College’s City School in Hamilton, Ont. Upon completion of the training, participants receive a micro-credential and employment services to help them successfully transition into long-term, stable employment.

Red River College joins Mohawk College, Vancouver Community College and Nova Scotia Community College in piloting the new training, which is designed to help people transition into careers in the supply chain sector, while also supporting economic recovery in their regions. Funding for the pilot is provided by the government of Canada under the Future Skills program.

“Red River College is committed to building more pathways for our students — especially our Indigenous, newcomer and immigrant learners — to move from classroom to career with the human and technical skills they need to access gainful employment, all while helping to rebuild the Manitoba economy,” says Dr. Christine Watson, RRC’s Vice-President, Academic and Research.

What You’ll Learn

  • Supply chain logistics environment
  • Using technology in the material handling workplace
  • Product receiving, storage, packing and shipping
  • Important 21st-century workplace skills that employers are looking for

Eligibility

Applicants must meet all of the following criteria:

  • 18 years of age or older
  • Legally entitled to work in Canada
  • Unemployed or working less than 20 hours per week
  • Not enrolled in full-time education

Course Details

  • Starts September 2021
  • Online and virtual delivery
    • Six weeks training
    • Two weeks paid work placement
  • Access to RRC student supports, including Indigenous supports Opportunity for child-care supports

If you would like to be contacted about the Materials Handling 4.0 program at Red River College, please visit rrc.ca/indigenous/materials-handling-4-0

Indigenous Achievement at the Innovation Centre Project [Webinar]

June 18, 2021

Join us for an interactive conversation about how Red River College can use its new space, the Innovation Centre Project, to strengthen Indigenous academic programs, supports and community on campus.

Isabel Bright (Dean, School of Indigenous Education), Carla Kematch (Manager, Truth and Reconciliation and Community Engagement) and Tracy Brant (Chair, Aboriginal Education and ACCESS Programs) will highlight some of the College’s Indigenous-focused academic programs and supports, opportunities for partnership with Indigenous entrepreneurs and businesses, and how the new space can help grow connections and community on campus.

This discussion is being moderated by Sky Bridges, CEO, The Winnipeg Foundation. Sky is a graduate of Red River College’s Business Administration program and is both the first Indigenous (Métis, Cree, Blackfoot) and LGBTQ2S+ person to hold the position of CEO at The Winnipeg Foundation.

When: Tuesday, June 29 2021
Time: 12:00p.m. CDT (Winnipeg)
Where: WebEx Events

If you require ASL interpretation or other accessibility items for this event, please email CollegeRelations@rrc.ca

Click here to read more about panelists.

Virtual Pride Events Explore the Two Spirit Experience

June 1, 2021

Pride Week 2021 features live events and self-guided resources that explore LGBTQ2+ inclusion and the Two-Spirt identity

Red River College’s Pride Week 2021, June 7-11, offers opportunities for the College community to gather virtually, create safer spaces and learn together.

“June is Pride Month and National Indigenous History Month, and the College has very strong Indigenous supports as well as powerful commitments through diversity and inclusion for LGBTQ2+. However, we witnessed the opportunity for education, enlightenment, and further inclusion for Two Spirit persons. During Pride 2021 we have decided to highlight Two Spirit identity, and provide opportunities for knowledge sharing and the creation of safe(r) spaces as we work towards enhancing inclusion and equity at the College,” says Priyanji Mediwake, Diversity and Inclusion Specialist.

The week begins with RRC’s Pride flag raising ceremonies with Fred Meier, President & CEO, and Dr. Christine Watson, Vice-President, Academic. Events include three live virtual opportunities as well as self-guided from the National Film Board of Canada and resources. The live events will provide opportunities for participants to engage in the conversation, share in a virtual Healing Lodge with Elder Gayle Pruden, a Two-Spirit Anishinaabe dancer, and hear lived experiences with special guests who will share more about the meaning of Two Spirit – from pre-colonization to the present. Live events will be held by either WebEx or Microsoft teams.

Thursday, June 10 – Live
Live: Panel Event: Healing and Reclaiming Two-Spirit Identity

12 – 1:30 pm
WebEx Events

Prior to colonization, First Nation’s peoples did not try to fit their societies into binaries of male and female for gender nor for sexuality. Those peoples who did not fit into these roles were given room to live, express themselves, and contribute to the community in a good way. Two Spirit people were celebrated and given important responsibilities such as teaching, healing, and leading.

Dr. Elaine Mordoch will present research findings on behalf of their research team to lead us into the panel discussion. Then, our panelists we will go on to unpack the Two-Spirited identity prior to contact, discuss how colonization has impacted Two Spirit ways of being in today’s culture and we will then discuss how these communities are reclaiming culture and space today. There will be an opportunity for you to ask panelists a question.

Panelists:

  • Lorne Olson, Filmmaker
  • Levi Alizaar Foy (Manidoo-gwiiwizens), Executive Director, Sunshine House
  • Barbara Bruce, O.M., President, All My Relations Inc; Associate of AMR Planning & Consulting
  • Dr. Myra Laramee, Indigenous Elder
  • Moderated by Bradley C West. CPHR. SHRM-SCP. CCP.PMC

“The word Two Spirit actually originated from Winnipeg. We have so many strong, intelligent, esteemed voices in this space locally, so to have them together for this discussion will be powerful,” says Carla Kematch, Manager, Truth and Reconciliation and Community Engagement. “It’s so important that we create opportunities for stories to be heard and to be able to have conversations in a safe space, especially when we need to try and create connections during this time of self-isolation. Cultural reclamation requires our attention, time and effort. We invite all to explore what the Indigenous perspective was pre-colonization and what it means today.”

To learn more and read panelist biographies, visit rrc.ca/diversity/resources/pride-2021/