Indigenous Education

Indigenous Education

Stay The Course

Stay the Course Speaker Series: Angelina Pelletier

May 12, 2022

Inspiring stories from RRC’s Indigenous Alumni

How do successful people get to where they are? What did that journey look like? What did they learn and how did they stay the course? What does it mean to be an Indigenous student in post-secondary?

The Stay the Course speaker series is a hand from one generation to the next, hosted by Carla Kematch, Manager, Truth and Reconciliation and Community & Engagement. Incredible RRC Indigenous Alumni share their experiences on their journey to success. Advancing Indigenous achievement at RRC means listening to Indigenous stories. This is just one of the many ways we can embed the efforts of Truth and Reconciliation in our daily lives.

Angelina Pelletier

Angelina Pelletier

Born and raised in Treaty 1 Territory, Angelina Pelletier is a passionate community advocate who specializes in educating and empowering young people with a focus on systems change. Currently, she is transitioning from a leadership position with a Housing First program, Wi Che Win at Ma Mawi Wi Chi Itata Centre, to a new position as Manager of Cities, Communities Building Youth Futures with a national non-profit organization, Tamarack Institute.

Her education is rooted in legal administration, human rights and community economic development and she is a trained facilitator in Intergroup Dialogue through the department of Social Work at the University of Manitoba. Angelina has volunteered her time as a note-taker for students with disabilities at the University of Winnipeg, as youth mentor for newcomer and refugee children at N.E.E.D.S. Centre and sat as Treasurer for the Indigenous Student Council at Red River College Polytech.

More recently, she sat as one of two Indigenous representatives as Director and Secretary of the Board at Main Street Project, and currently sits on the Board of Directors at Inspired By Wonder Inc. As a daughter, auntie and mother, family is what grounds Angelina both in her work and identity and is her biggest motivator in executing systemic change. She is the proud mother of two beautiful children, Tayshaun and Aminata and life partner to Abdou.

Stay the Course Speaker Series: Dean Davis

March 10, 2022

Inspiring stories from RRC’s Indigenous Alumni

How do successful people get to where they are? What did that journey look like? What did they learn and how did they stay the course? What does it mean to be an Indigenous student in post-secondary?

The Stay the Course speaker series is a hand from one generation to the next, hosted by Carla Kematch, Manager, Truth and Reconciliation and Community & Engagement. Every month, incredible RRC Indigenous Alumni share their experiences on their journey to success. Advancing Indigenous achievement at RRC means listening to Indigenous stories. This is just one of the many ways we can embed the efforts of Truth and Reconciliation in our daily lives.

Dean Davis

Dean Davis is Indigenous from Ebb and Flow First Nation who has worked in Winnipeg as a technologist in many industries over the past 30 years. These industries include Repair/Calibration Services, Telecom, Medical Devices and the latest Aerospace which he hopes to be the last. He is a graduate of a two-year engineering technology program at Red River College.

His education and work experience has developed him into a Configuration Control Specialist in the Helicopter Division at Standard Aero.

Stay the Course Speaker Series: Darrell Brown

January 11, 2022

Inspiring stories from RRC’s Indigenous Alumni

How do successful people get to where they are? What did that journey look like? What did they learn and how did they stay the course? What does it mean to be an Indigenous student in post-secondary?

The Stay the Course speaker series is a hand from one generation to the next, hosted by Carla Kematch, Manager, Truth and Reconciliation and Community & Engagement. Every month, incredible RRC Indigenous Alumni share their experiences on their journey to success. Advancing Indigenous achievement at RRC means listening to Indigenous stories. This is just one of the many ways we can embed the efforts of Truth and Reconciliation in our daily lives.

Darrell Brown

Darrell Brown is a Cree business owner based in Winnipeg. Darrell is President of Kisik Clean Energy and Kisik Commercial Furniture. He is a 2004 founding member and current chair of the Aboriginal Chamber of Commerce based in Manitoba. He holds an Advanced Diploma in International Business from Red River College in Manitoba and a Certificate of Indigenous Leadership, Governance and Management Excellence from the Banff Centre. Darrell holds the designation of ICD.D from The Rotman, Directors Education Program through The Institute for Corporate Directors. Darrell also holds a certificate in the 20/20 Catalyst program focusing on the Indigenous Renewable Energy Sector. Darrell is the newly elected chair of the Indigenous Clean Energy Network, a social enterprise to advance renewable energy for indigenous people across Canada.

Stay the Course Speaker Series: Christine Merasty

October 27, 2021

Inspiring stories from RRC’s Indigenous Alumni

How do successful people get to where they are? What did that journey look like? What did they learn and how did they stay the course? What does it mean to be an Indigenous student in post-secondary?

The Stay the Course speaker series is a hand from one generation to the next, hosted by Carla Kematch, Manager, Truth and Reconciliation and Community & Engagement. Every month, incredible RRC Indigenous Alumni share their experiences on their journey to success. Advancing Indigenous achievement at RRC means listening to Indigenous stories. This is just one of the many ways we can embed the efforts of Truth and Reconciliation in our daily lives.

Christine Merasty, Dene Cree Designs Inc.

Christine Merasty is a Denesuline First Nation woman from Lac Brochet, MB and raised in Bowsman MB. She was a part of the sixty scoop era. She completed her Grade 12 at Winnipeg Adult Education, continued into University of Winnipeg for four years, however did not receive her diploma. She then attended Red River College Polytech and graduated from the Community Development/ Community Economic Development Program. She says this is where her real learning began. She is now the owner of Dene Cree Designs Inc. with her husband Raymond Merasty.

 

Stay the Course Speaker Series: Haven Stumpf

May 26, 2021

Inspiring stories from RRC’s Indigenous Alumni

How do successful people get to where they are? What did that journey look like? What did they learn and how did they stay the course? What does it mean to be an Indigenous student in post-secondary?

The Stay the Course speaker series is a hand from one generation to the next, hosted by Carla Kematch, Manager, Truth and Reconciliation and Community & Engagement. Every month, incredible RRC Indigenous Alumni share their experiences on their journey to success. Advancing Indigenous achievement at RRC means listening to Indigenous stories. This is just one of the many ways we can embed the efforts of Truth and Reconciliation in our daily lives.

Haven Stumpf, Executive Director, Urban Circle Training Centre Inc.

My name is Haven Stumpf and my spirit name is White Eagle Woman from the Deer Clan. I carry the Sundance Colours of Blue, White, Yellow and Red. I am a 55-years-old, First Nations woman whose family roots are from Brokenhead Ojibway Nation, MB. I was born, raised and lived all my life in the North End of Winnipeg. The highlight of my life is raising my son as a single mother, who is now 36-years-old, and being grandmother of two beautiful grandchildren who are now 13 and 15-years-old. They teach me daily and allow me to continue to grow and learn the precious “life lessons” that arise in my life journey.

Our family, like many others have been affected by the historical genocide in Canada – the Residential School System. Our family has been stripped of our Indigenous culture, language and identity. I myself have been stripped of a mother, a loving nurturing mother who just didn’t have the skills of being a mother. Today, our family is still affected by these systems as I raise my two grandchildren, avoiding falling into the same cycles of systematic oppression.

I am now entering into my 26th year with Urban Circle Training Centre Inc. and am currently the Executive Director. I have come full circle as I am a graduate of Urban Circle’s Banking Business Retail Program in 1996. I started off as the receptionist at Urban Circle and have worked my way into my position today with continuous education, workshops with professional and personal growth while working full-time. I have always worked a part-time job to meet my financial obligations as I was always considered the “working poor.” It wasn’t until five years ago I left my part-time job as a support worker with a CFS agency and focused all my energy into Urban Circle.

I have been taught the importance of the Seven Teachings and the Medicine Wheel Teachings by the many Elders (particularly the late Elder Stella Blackbird and Elder Audrey Bone) whom I have met throughout my journey. Learning the importance of these teachings and beliefs have brought balance and wellness in my life. It is difficult at times to continue to walk this good life as these teachings are new and sometimes the old coping is the one I know and the easiest to do. The “wellness” that is displayed is like a domino effect and now hope it continues to grow within my children’s lives and also onto my extended families lives.

Stay the Course Speaker Series: Derek McCorrister

April 12, 2021

Inspiring stories from RRC’s Indigenous Alumni

How do successful people get to where they are? What did that journey look like? What did they learn and how did they stay the course? What does it mean to be an Indigenous student in post-secondary?

The Stay the Course speaker series is a hand from one generation to the next, hosted by Carla Kematch, Manager, Truth and Reconciliation and Community & Engagement. Every month, incredible RRC Indigenous Alumni share their experiences on their journey to success. Advancing Indigenous achievement at RRC means listening to Indigenous stories. This is just one of the many ways we can embed the efforts of Truth and Reconciliation in our daily lives.

Derek McCorrister, Owner, Creative Director, Modern Clan

Originally from Peguis First Nation, Derek has extensive experience working with the federal government and Indigenous organizations in the private and not-for-profit sectors. He digs deep to build Modern Clan’s portfolio and uses his strategic savvy, technical knowledge and in-depth business understanding to navigate between client goals and end results.

Derek led the development of the strategic plan for Chief Peguis Investment Corporation, which has led to historic acquisitions for the Peguis First Nation. Derek continues to work in partnership with many clients through Additions to Reserves projects in Manitoba and still hones his graphic design and production artist skills daily.

Stay the Course Speaker Series: David Thomas

February 24, 2021

Inspiring stories from RRC’s Indigenous Alumni

How do successful people get to where they are? What did that journey look like? What did they learn and how did they stay the course? What does it mean to be an Indigenous student in post-secondary?

The Stay the Course speaker series is a hand from one generation to the next, hosted by Carla Kematch, Manager, Truth and Reconciliation and Community & Engagement. Every month, incredible RRC Indigenous Alumni share their experiences on their journey to success. Advancing Indigenous achievement at RRC means listening to Indigenous stories. This is just one of the many ways we can embed the efforts of Truth and Reconciliation in our daily lives.

David Thomas

David Thomas is from the Peguis First Nation, and a graduate of both the RRC drafting program as well as the Master of Architecture program at the University of Manitoba. He is currently the Manager of Planning and Design for the Treaty #1 Development Corporation developing the former Kapyong Barracks site in Winnipeg. In 2018, he exhibited work at the 2018 Venice Biennale as part Canada’s submission: Unceded, Voices of the Land. David is currently guiding the final stages of design for the Indigenous Peoples Garden part of Canada’s Diversity Garden located at Assiniboine Park in Winnipeg. David draws from lived experiences as an Indigenous person to create placemaking projects that include the Canadian Museum of Human Rights, Vancouver General Hospital and Humber College in Toronto. As well as presenting internationally in Aotearoa and the UK David mentors and actively supports young indigenous designers in the community.

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Stay the Course Speaker Series: Sheila North

January 25, 2021

Inspiring stories from RRC’s Indigenous Alumni

How do successful people get to where they are? What did that journey look like? What did they learn and how did they stay the course? What does it mean to be an Indigenous student in post-secondary?

The Stay the Course speaker series is a hand from one generation to the next, hosted by Carla Kematch, Manager, Truth and Reconciliation and Community & Engagement. Every month, incredible RRC Indigenous Alumni share their experiences on their journey to success. Advancing Indigenous achievement at RRC means listening to Indigenous stories. This is just one of the many ways we can embed the efforts of Truth and Reconciliation in our daily lives.

Sheila North

Sheila North, (Winnipeg, Bunibonibee Cree Nation): Sheila is the former Grand Chief of the Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak (MKO), and former Chief Communications Officer for the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs. She ran for the position of National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations in 2018 on a platform of reforms. Sheila is a former CTV journalist and documentarist, and was nominated for a Gemini Award as a CBC journalist. As a film maker, Sheila released a documentary, 1200+, about missing and murdered Indigenous women girls (MMIWG) featured on CTV in 2019. And, as a Cree host, she has been voicing episodes of Taken, a series about MMIW, for APTN and CBC.

Stay the Course Speaker Series: Kevin Monkman

November 23, 2020

Inspiring stories from RRC’s Indigenous Alumni

How do successful people get to where they are? What did that journey look like? What did they learn and how did they stay the course? What does it mean to be an Indigenous student in post-secondary?

The Stay the Course speaker series is a hand from one generation to the next, hosted by Carla Kematch, Manager, Truth and Reconciliation and Community & Engagement. Every month, incredible RRC Indigenous Alumni share their experiences on their journey to success. Advancing Indigenous achievement at RRC means listening to Indigenous stories. This is just one of the many ways we can embed the efforts of Truth and Reconciliation in our daily lives.

Kevin Monkman

Kevin Monkman is from the small community of Vogar Manitoba and is currently a Research Analyst with Manitoba Hydro.  He has been with Hydro for 14 years in various roles. He started out as a summer student and was lucky enough to continue working throughout the school year.

Kevin attended Red River College and graduated in 2008 with a diploma in Business Administration. Attending college was a challenge, being a mature student with a young family of three children. Kevin says the staff in the Indigenous department assisted him in making the adjustment easier with balancing school and work. He changed my mindset to treat his studies as though he was going to work. He says he would get to college at 8 am, whether he had class or not, and would stay till 4 pm.  Continuously reviewing his school work and trying to get ahead helped him become an honour roll student. He says this method helped so in the evenings he could concentrate on his children.

Stay the Course Speaker Series: Judy Klassen

October 29, 2020

Inspiring stories from RRC’s Indigenous Alumni

How do successful people get to where they are? What did that journey look like? What did they learn and how did they stay the course? What does it mean to be an Indigenous student in post-secondary?

The Stay the Course speaker series is a hand from one generation to the next, hosted by Carla Kematch, Manager, Truth and Reconciliation and Community & Engagement. Every month, incredible RRC Indigenous Alumni share their experiences on their journey to success. Advancing Indigenous achievement at RRC means listening to Indigenous stories. This is just one of the many ways we can embed the efforts of Truth and Reconciliation in our daily lives.

Judy Klassen

Judy Klassen was raised in St. Theresa Point First Nation and was the second eldest child to Charles and the late Lillian Wood. Both her parents attained their Bachelor of Education when she was young and became teachers in their home reserve. She grew up in her parent’s businesses throughout her young life. Her parents inspired her to get an education and their teachings taught her how to be self-reliant. Judy became an entrepreneur herself at a very young age by making and selling her native beaded crafts.

Judy went on to having six kids of her own, started many businesses throughout her life in St. Theresa Point but had to leave for higher education as she still wanted to attend post-secondary. She enrolled at Red River College in Steinbach and obtained a two-year business studies diploma, for which she made the Dean’s List. She was fueled by the knowledge that she easily handled a demanding family life, held a part-time job, plus she also took in three teenage nephews. With a total of nine kids in tow, she enrolled in the I.H. Asper School of Business at the University of Manitoba, graduating in 2013 with a Bachelor of Commerce (Hons.) Degree.

She went back to work in Steinbach and was working as a junior accountant when she was asked to run for political office. She took on a long-standing incumbent and won the seat as the Member of the Legislative Assembly for Kewatinook. It was within this role that Judy became the first ever First Nation female Interim Leader for a provincial party, the Manitoba Liberals, across Canada.

She then decided to toss her hat into the federal ring in hopes of knocking out the long-time incumbent there, but it was a successful failure. She shook up the North, but it simply wasn’t in the cards. She then was asked to run for Chief of her home reserve but decided to start off by running for Council. She became the Head Councillor but had to resign when one of her children developed a serious medical condition.

Judy loves the return to a private life, reconnecting with friends and family and is enjoying the peace that that brings. She is currently the Director for Greenville Place Inc. here in Winnipeg and is having a ball.