Indigenous Education

Indigenous Education

MMIWG2S Red Dress Pin Workshop

September 26, 2022

Join us for an evening workshop at the Indigenous Student Support Centre, to create a red dress pin with Gerri-Lee Pangman. The event is intended as a way to connect while opening up a dialogue around Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and Two Spirit (MMIWG2S) folx.

Participants will complete a red dress pin to wear on October 4, to recognize and bring awareness to MMIWG2S.

The event is free of charge and open to RRC Polytech employees and students.

  • Date: October 3, 6pm-9pm
  • Location: Indigenous Student Support Centre, F209, Notre Dame Campus. Click here for a map.

Food and refreshments will be provided for participants. Advance registration is required as capacity is limited to 20 participants.

For any questions about the workshop, please contact Terri-Lynn Anderson at tlanderson@rrc.ca.

About the facilitator:

Gerri-Lee Pangman (McPherson) is a member of the Pegius First Nation. She was born and raised in the heart of Winnipeg, Manitoba. She is a wife and mother of four beautiful children, two sons, and two daughters and just recently became a Kohkum last July to a healthy beautiful grandson.

In 2013 Gerri-Lee and her family tragically lost her sister Jennifer Dawn McPherson who lived on Hanson Island, BC., and also, her Aunt Jennifer Johnston in 1980 in Winnipeg. After the great losses in her family to murder, she is now fully aware of the tragedies and injustices faced by our Indigenous Women, Girls and Two Spirit. She works hard to heal and bring light to the issue of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and Two Spirit (MMIWG2S).

During her grieving and trauma after losing her sister, Gerri-Lee found the strength to cope with her sister’s loss by healing through art-making, earrings, ornaments, dreamcatchers, and stained glass to honor her beloved sister’s memory. She honors her sister’s spirit through J.D.M. Indigenous Designs with her older sister Kim. She also participated in community activities and programs such as Medicine Bear Counseling by facilitating weekly beading circles with other MMIWG2S families for five years as well as in schools and community centers, and also traveled across Canada with the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls to do healing through beading sessions with MMIWG family members and the staff of the Inquiry.

She has turned to and introduced her family to traditional ceremonies such as Sundance, and has completed five years. She also shares her sister Jennifer’s story while teaching how to make red dress pins from coast to coast to coast on Zoom sessions to help in breaking the cycle of violence towards MMIWG2S and colonization.

We recognize that this workshop may trigger strong emotions, especially for those with lived experiences. It is recommended that we all check in on ourselves and access the resources available to us to ensure we are taking good care of our mental health.

Mental health and self-care resources:

If you need help, please don’t hesitate to reach out or access any of the following resources:

Self-care is a powerful tool to help us work through emotions and take better care of our minds, bodies and spirits and can come in many forms and is not one-size-fits-all.

  • Here are some recommendations:
  • Spend time with a loved one
  • Phone a friend
  • Ask a loved one for a hug
  • Read a book, watch a favourite movie, or listen to music
  • Go for a walk, do yoga, or exercise
  • Take a warm bath or shower
  • Cook yourself a nice meal
  • Meditation or prayer
  • Download a meditation app
  • Write in a journal
  • Get proper sleep

Can’t attend the workshop?
Leave a message of hope and remembrance on a red dress cutout by visiting the Indigenous Student Support Centre, F209, during Truth and Reconciliation Week, or stop by the Community Kitchen Party from 12:00 to 1:00 p.m. outside of the Notre Dame Library on Wednesday, Sept 28.