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Indigenous Education

Truth and Reconciliation Week

September 12, 2019

Truth and Reconciliation Week is a collaboration between the Students’ Association and Indigenous Student Supports and Community Relations. Beginning with Orange Shirt Day: Every Child Matters, and closing on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Honouring and Awareness Day, this week is dedicated to learning about Indigenous culture and history and starting a conversation around Truth and Reconciliation and the 94 Calls to Action. All are welcome to participate in special events and join the conversation. Every Child Matters shirts and MMIWG shirts are available for purchase at the Campus Store.

We will be asking staff and students to help us collect Messages of Reconciliation on red paper dresses at both campuses (in the Library Hallway and Roblin Atrium) leading up to Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Honouring and Awareness Day on Friday, Oct 4. We hope to fill the hallway with red dresses. At the end of the week, the SA will mail the messages to the federal government.

More detail about specific events and topics can be found at the bottom of this post.

Notre Dame Campus Events

All week long in the Library Hall, there will be information and activities to learn more about TRC and Indigenous culture and issues.

You’ll also find more information about the Moose Hide Campaign, a grassroots movement of Indigenous and non-Indigenous men and boys who are standing up against violence towards women and children. Wearing this moose hide signifies your commitment to honour, respect, and protect the women and children in your life and to work together to end violence against women and children.

Monday, Sept 30

Orange Shirt Day: Every Child Matters
Wear an Orange Shirt to honour the survivors of the Canadian Residential School System.

Guest Speaker: Kim Wheeler
Community Economic Development students host Kim Wheeler for a discussion on Canada’s Residential School System and Orange Shirt Day.
9:30 am – 11 am | eTV Studio, GM31
Live streamed to all campuses.

Traditional Sharing Circle: Understanding the Effects of Residential Schools
11 am – 12 pm | Indigenous Support Centre, F209
All are welcome!

Movie Monday: Truth and Reconciliation Edition
*Dance Me Outside with special guest Ryan Black
12 pm – 1 pm | The Cave
Free popcorn and beverages.
*Please note: content may be triggering.

Tuesday, Oct 1

Guest Speaker: Travis Bighetty, Bear Clan Patrol Inc.
12 pm – 1 pm | The Cave
Live stream option available. (See below for Live Stream instructions.)

Wednesday, Oct 2

Learn to Make a Dream Catcher
Supplies and snacks will be provided. Limited supplies – available on a first come, first served basis.
4 pm – 7 pm | The Cave

Thursday, Oct 3

RRCSA Spectrum Grand Opening
Join us for the official opening and blessing of the Spectrum space: a safe place for LGBQT2S people and their allies to spend time in.
11:50 am | Indigenous Support Centre, F209: Smudge
12:15 am | Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

Friday, Oct 4

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Honouring and Awareness Day
We invite staff and students to wear red in recognition of MMIWG.

This River with special guest Erika MacPherson
A 20 minute short documentary on the devastating experience of searching for a loved one who didn’t come home.
11 am – 11:30 am | Indigenous Support Centre, F209

Indigenous Market
Enjoy some wild rice pudding, bannock, performances, and support Indigenous artisans.
11 am – 2 pm | Library Hallway

Exchange District Campus Events

Monday, Sept 30

Orange Shirt Day: Every Child Matters
Wear an Orange Shirt to honour the survivors of the Canadian Residential School System.

Traditional Sharing Circle: Understanding the Effects of Residential Schools
11 am – 12 pm | Indigenous Support Centre, P407
All are welcome!

Tuesday, Oct 1

Learn to Make a Dream Catcher
Supplies and snacks will be provided. Limited supplies – available on a first come, first served basis.
4 pm – 7 pm | P107

Wednesday, Oct 2

Guest Speaker: Travis Bighetty, Bear Clan Patrol Inc.
Free Pizza
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm | P107

Friday, Oct 4

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Honouring and Awareness Day
We invite staff and students to wear red in recognition of MMIWG.

Red Dress Pin Making
Join us for bannock and pin making.
Indigenous Support Centre, P407


About Orange Shirt Day:
The annual Orange Shirt Day on September 30th opens the door to global conversation on all aspects of Residential Schools. It is an opportunity to create meaningful discussion about the intergenerational effects of Residential Schools and the legacy they have left behind that affect all. A discussion all Canadians can tune into and create bridges with each other for reconciliation. A day for survivors to be reaffirmed that they matter, and so do those that have been affected. Every Child Matters, even if they are an adult, from now on. Former student Phyllis (Jack) Webstad told her story of her first day at Residential School when her shiny new orange shirt, bought by her grandmother, was taken from her as a six-year old girl.

About Residential Schools:
If you would like to learn more about the history of the Canadian Residential School System, please visit 100yearsofloss.ca for an interactive timeline of events.

About Dance Me Outside:
For anyone who has never lived within the boundaries of a First Nation Reserve, life on a Reserve is quite different from a regular town or city. This superb film will give you a glimpse into “the life.”
This Canadian drama based on a book by W.P. Kinsella, examines the tension between Native Canadians and Anglos in Canada from a Native perspective. Silas Crow, who lives on a Northern Ontario reserve, wants to take a mechanic’s course in Toronto with his friend Frank Fencepost. But before he can enroll, the teen must write a short narrative describing his home. The film is a series of alternatively poignant vignettes from Crow’s narrative.

Live Streaming:
Follow this link to view the live streaming presentation: live.etvlabs.com
Click on the ‘Live Stream’ graphic to play. No username or password is required. The stream will go live shortly before the presentation begins.
During the live presentation, you are encouraged to ask questions or add comments. To do so, please click on the “word bubble” icon found on the bottom right of the player. Please include your name, email address (if you require a follow-up response), and a subject heading.
Note: You can also use the “word bubble” to report any technical issues.

About Bear Clan Patrol:
The concept behind the Bear Clan Patrol, is community people working with the community to provide personal security in the inner city in a non-threatening, non-violent, non-judgmental and supportive way. Currently there are well over 1,500 men and women involved with the Patrol on a volunteer basis. This Winnipeg community safety model has proven to be affective and has been implemented in several cities, towns and communities as a means to making city streets safer.

About MMIWG Awareness Day:
More than 1,200 Indigenous women and girls in Canada have gone missing or been murdered since 1980. According to Statistics Canada, Indigenous women and girls make up four per cent of the total Canadian female population, represent 10 per cent of missing women and, on average, 16 per cent of female homicide cases, a number that fluctuates and was as high as 21 per cent in 2014.

The Legislative Assembly of Manitoba has named October 4 Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Honouring and Awareness Day whereas vigils honouring missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls are held across Canada each year, raising public awareness and building a movement of social change in respect of violence against Indigenous women and girls.

To learn more, visit:

About This River:
When the body of a 14-year-old girl was pulled from Winnipeg’s Red River in 2014, it sparked a public outcry and renewed calls for a national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women. It also galvanized a small group of Winnipeg citizens, who took action and formed Drag the Red. This grassroots collective of volunteers searches the Red River and its banks for clues that might answer some of the questions surrounding the disappearances and murders. For more information, visit cbc.ca/shortdocs/shorts/this-river

 

For more information about Truth and Reconciliation Week, contact Sue Thiebaut at 204.632.2106 or sthiebaut@rrc.ca

Truth and Reconciliation Week may be triggering. Please do not hesitate to reach out to Indigenous Student Support Wellness Counselors if you or someone you know needs to speak to someone. Contact Morgan at 204.632.3773 or mpaul50@rrc.ca, or visit rrc.ca/counselling