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Reclaiming Well-Being: A Lunch and Talk with Olympian Waneek Horn-Miller

March 8, 2019

You’re invited to attend a lunch and talk featuring Waneek Horn-Miller – Mohawk woman, activist, and Olympian. She’ll be speaking about turning trauma into motivation and reclaiming well-being. All students, staff and faculty are invited to attend.

Date: March 26

Time: Noon – 1:30pm

Location: South Gym

Come early for a free pizza lunch. If you have accessibility needs, please contact Breanna.

ASL interpretation will be provided. If you can’t make it in person, catch the livestream at rrc.ca/streaming.

Throughout her life, Waneek Horn-Miller has always stood up for what was right—as a mother, an activist, an athlete, and an entrepreneur. This has entailed hard choices, pain, and sacrifice. But this commitment has also made her one of Canada’s most inspiring figures.

Horn-Miller’s public life began in 1990 at the age of 14. During the Oka Crisis, she protested the planned development of condos and a golf course on traditional Kanien’kehá:ka (Mohawk) lands and burial grounds near Montreal. After nearly 80 days of stand-off with the RCMP and armed forces, she was stabbed in the chest by a Canadian soldier wielding a bayonet.

This near-death experience marked a turning point in her life. Instead of succumbing to very real traumas, including PTSD, she found the strength to pursue, and achieve, incredible things. “I come from people who have gone through horrific things in history,” she says. “War, death, famine, genocide. How many times did my ancestors want to give up, lay down, and die? But they didn’t. They fought to continue. You have to keep going forward.”

One of Horn-Miller’s greatest achievements has been in athletics. “Sport in the Native world is more than just something to be physically active,” she says. “It’s a suicide preventer. It’s a self-esteem creator. It’s a leadership developer.” She was the first woman to be named Carleton University’s Athlete of the Year, which she won four years in a row. After winning gold with her water polo team at the Pan Am Games in 1999, she became the first Mohawk woman from this country to ever compete in the Olympic games, co-captaining Team Canada in Sydney in 2000. That same year, she appeared on the cover of TIME magazine.

As one of Canada’s few Aboriginal Olympians, Waneek has used her passion and experiences in sport to influence Aboriginal and non-aboriginal leadership towards making Sport and Wellness a community building priority.

RRC’s Healthy Minds Healthy College Initiative, along with the Students’ Association and School of Indigenous Education are so pleased to welcome Waneek.

Students and Staff Join National Mental Health Campaign

February 21, 2019

On January 30th, RRC joined others across the country in observing Bell Let’s Talk Day – a campaign dedicated to moving mental health forward in Canada. The strategy is built on four pillars: anti-stigma, improving access to care, supporting world-class research, and leading by example in workplace mental health.

At nine different campus locations, staff and student volunteers served free refreshments, distributed printed mental health resources and invited folks to contribute to a giant art canvas. On the canvas, people shared words of encouragement or supportive images to encourage someone who may be struggling with mental health difficulties.

 

STTC

 

We know that each year 1 in 5 Canadians will experience a mental health problem. While over the course of our entire lifespan, nearly half of us will. Unfortunately, despite this prevalence, judgmental and prejudiced attitudes about mental illness abound, causing many to struggle in silence, feeling shame, embarrassment, or guilt that compounds their distress.

 

Winkler Campus

 

We envision a community where mental health problems are accepted as a part of the human experience; where people can speak openly about these, receiving appropriate health care and community support.

Notre Dame Campus

 

In addition to the Bell Let’s Talk Day activities, the RRCSA participated in the Students Let’s Act campaign – a national advocacy effort, lobbying the Federal Government to devote more resources to post-secondary student mental health supports.

Steinbach Campus

 

Portage la Prairie Campus

Missed the Anxiety Forum? Watch the Recording Here

February 21, 2019

On February 14th RRC hosted an Anxiety Forum featuring local Clinical Psychologist, Dr. Jason Ediger. Thanks to the eTV crew, we have a recording available here.  Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services provided ASL interpretation, which is also featured in the recording.

Dr. Ediger spoke about Anxiety in a college context and helped us understand worry, panic attacks, performance anxiety, social fears, and more. He provided helpful tips and introduced coping techniques that so many can benefit from.

Additional thanks to the Manitoba Psychological Society and Dr. Ediger for offering this public education at RRC.

If you think the services of a Psychologist could help you reach your goals, you’ll be pleased to know that these services are covered under RRC’s Student and Employee Benefit plans. You can use an online directory to find a Psychologist near you.

Further information and resources about anxiety can be found at the Anxiety Disorders Association of Manitoba.

Anxiety Forums on Campus: Psychologists to educate on coping skills

February 8, 2019

February is Psychology Month; a time when Psychologists engage the public, educating us on how psychology works to help people live healthy and happy lives. (Canadian Psychology Association)

To celebrate Psychology Month, the Manitoba Psychological Society has organized a variety of educational seminars for the public on a wide variety of psychology-related topics. RRC is fortunate to be hosting two such events. We’ve called them “Anxiety Forums.”

Each forum will include a talk by a prominent Psychologist as well as audience Q & A. Free pizza lunch is provided during both forums!

What is Anxiety?

According to the Anxiety Disorders Association of Manitoba (ADAM), everyone experiences anxiety from time to time. It’s completely normal and can even be helpful. For example, if you’re anxious about an upcoming test, your anxiety can motivate you to study well. However, anxiety can sometimes become severe and negatively affect your life. If your anxiety has reached this point, you may have an anxiety disorder.

Here at RRC we see many students who are experiencing problems with anxiety. These problems affect academic success and overall well-being.

Anxiety Forum Details

During the two forums, the speakers will share helpful coping strategies related to managing anxiety in a College setting. Although the primary target audience is students, staff and faculty will no doubt benefit from the material presented and discussion to follow.

Registration is not required. All are welcome.

EDC: Tuesday, February 12th, noon-1pm in the Great West Life Lecture Theatre with Dr. Elizabeth Hebert

NDC: Thursday, February 14th, noon-1pm in the Black Lecture Theatre with Dr. Jason Ediger

The NDC forum will also be recorded and streamed by eTV for the benefit of regional campuses.

Follow the link below to view the Anxiety Forum live streaming presentation: rrc.ca/etv/streaming/

Click on the ‘Live Stream’ image to play. No username or password is required. The stream will go live shortly before the presentation begins.

During the live presentation, you are encouraged to ask questions or add comments. To do so, please click on the “word bubble” icon found on the bottom right of the player. Please include your name, email address (if you require a follow-up response), and a subject heading.

Note: You can also use the “word bubble” to report any technical issues.

More About the Presenters

Dr. Jason Ediger, C. Psych.

Dr. Ediger has a special interest in blending cognitive behaviour therapy with mindfulness based approaches to change and coping. His practice focuses on anxiety, mood difficulties, chronic pain and health concerns in adults and adolescents. He has extensive experience with disability claims and return to work issues. Read his full bio here.

Dr. Elizabeth Hebert

Dr. Elizabeth Hebert is a psychologist in the Department of Clinical Health Psychology and an assistant professor at the University of Manitoba. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec. Her research focuses on anxiety and worry and the factors that drive them, including difficulty tolerating uncertainty in daily life. Dr. Hebert is the psychologist for the Shared Care Program in Winnipeg. Her clinical work focuses on primary care settings, and includes evidence-based psychological treatments for anxiety, mood, and ADHD; psychodiagnostic and cognitive assessments; and interdisciplinary consultation.

 

The 2019 Get Movin’ Challenge Starts Friday

January 29, 2019

RRC’s Recreation Services is hosting this year’s Get Movin’ Challenge. Those who are involved are trying to log 7,000 steps per day, through a variety of activities. Sign up to join the fun. The prizes are fantastic this year!

Since physical activity contributes to a healthy mind, we’re supporting the Challenge with three group walks outdoors at the Notre Dame Campus. These walks are a perfect opportunity to connect with friends or colleagues, meet new people, get fresh air and sunshine, while logging 3000 steps.

Walks will start at 12:15 outside the Campus Store (NDC) and will return to the same place by 12:50.

Bring your warm gear; walks will go ahead unless the Environment Canada website indicates a temperature of -27 C or lower with the wind chill factor.

Dates

Wednesday February 6, 13, and 27

All students, staff and faculty are welcome to join; there is no need to register.

Vision Board Workshops by Rising Strong: Register Today!

January 23, 2019

We’re excited to welcome Karina Walker, founder of Rising Strong, to facilitate two vision board workshops for RRC staff and students.

Vision boards are visual representations of your hopes, goals and desires. They help you visually experience what you want to do, where you want to go, who you want to be and how you want to feel. With busy schedules and distractions, having a board representing everything you want in life can help reinforce daily affirmations, clarify your goals and help set intentions.

This is sure to be an empowering evening of crafting and setting goals! Check out Karina’s Instagram to get a sense of her work.

Both workshops will feature free tea and dainties as well as a door prize draw.  Karina supplies everything you need to make your vision board, so just bring yourself (and perhaps a friend).

Notre Dame Campus
Wednesday, February 6th 4-7pm in the Prairie Lights Meeting Room

Exchange District Campus
Tuesday, February 5th 4-7pm in P107, The Roblin Centre

All students and staff are welcome and can register by emailing Breanna Sawatzky.

 

 

 

Bell Let’s Talk Day Activities: Get Involved!

January 22, 2019

On January 30th RRC will be observing Bell Let’s Talk Day with a day full of supportive conversations and stigma-busting activities.

We know that each year one in five Canadians will experience mental illness. One of the biggest hurdles for anyone suffering from mental illness is overcoming the stigma. It is the number one reason why two-thirds of those living with mental illness do not seek help. So, get involved and help bring positive change.

Paint on our giant canvas
Join us for tea, cookies, and conversations. Paint supportive words or images on a giant art canvas.

Notre Dame Campus: Library Hallway and SSTC Lobby, 11am – 2pm
Exchange District Campus: Atrium 11am – 2 pm

Workshop
Attend a workshop where you’ll learn how to start helpful conversations about mental health. Registration is not required.
Notre Dame Campus: Room F210, 12:05 – 12:55pm

Drew Dudley Talk
Drew Dudley, keynote speaker, founder of Day One Leadership and author of This is Day One, will be talking about his personal experience with Bipolar Disorder.
Exchange District Campus: Room A104 The Roblin Centre, 12 – 1pm

Visit the Bell Let’s Talk website
At https://letstalk.bell.ca/en/ you’ll find several insightful videos where people with lived experience of mental illness share their stories. You’ll also find information about ways to contribute to fundraising efforts by participating in the social media campaign.

CreComm Student Invites You to “Love Your Mind” With Free Self-Care Workshops

January 14, 2019

“It’s time for you to take self-care into your hands and Love Your Mind,” urges CreComm student, Jennifer Pazdor. She, in partnership with Mood Disorders Association of Manitoba, is hosting two individual days of self-care for youth and young adults in Winnipeg.

The workshops will cover five areas of self-care:

  • Mindfulness
  • Yoga
  • Nutrition
  • Expressive Art
  • Music

Each topic will be taught by a skilled instructor who will explain how the technique can impact your wellbeing and help you learn to use the technique in your life.

Workshops are free to attend so choose the day or location that’s best for you and reserve your ticket on Eventbrite.

January 19 workshop: Prairie Lights Dining Room (Red River College Notre Dame Campus, 11360 Skinner Rd.)

January 20 workshop: Temple 23 Winnipeg (Exchange District, 62 Albert St.).

Food and beverage will be available. There will be door prizes and giveaways. Each attendee will receive a self-care package at the end of the workshop with some gifts and guides to self-care.

Donations to Mood Disorders Association of Manitoba are welcome.

Follow Love Your Mind on social media for more information: @loveyourmindwpg and check out their website: loveyourmindwpg.com.

Wellness Weekly: Curated Readings

January 8, 2019

In our Wellness Weekly, mental health roundup feature we curate some of the best writing on the web related to health and wellbeing. Here is some recommended reading for this week.

  • On Psychology Today, David DiSalvo writes about sleep’s connections with learning, emotion regulation, and anxiety. He presents evidence that disrupted sleep derails the brain’s normal cycle, affecting memory, the nervous and immune systems, and more. He also informs readers that “sleep therapy” could be an effective method of treating anxiety disorders and goes on to give some tips for recovering from sleep loss. Read Understanding the Connection Between Sleep and Anxiety.

 

  • Over at NPR, Maanvi Singh writes about some of the benefits of expressing gratitude. She summarizes many different forms of gratitude, including writing thank you letters and keeping a gratitude journal. In addition to the noted benefits, Singh also highlights what gratitude can’t do and some gaps in the research. For a richer understanding of gratitude and perhaps some ideas to apply personally, read If You Feel Thankful, Write it Down. It’s Good For Your Health.

 

  • On the Harvard Business Review, Shawn Achor and Michelle Gielan explore the now ubiquitous topic of resilience. They argue against what they call a “militaristic, ‘tough’ approach to resilience and grit.” Instead, they outline evidence that rest periods are the key to resilience and eventual success. Rest from work and from screens, in fact, is key to reducing accidents and other health and safety problems. They assert that the “key to resilience is trying really hard, then stopping, recovering, and then trying again.” Find this interesting? Read Resilience is About How You Recharge, Not How You Endure.  

Do you have some favorite reading you’d like featured? Contact Breanna.

Get 2019 Off to a Mindful Start

January 8, 2019

Can you receive difficult messages with openness? Are you able to step back from your thoughts and watch them come and go?  Can you manage to reverse the stress response and calm your nervous system? All of these skills are key to building good mental health and all are part of the 30 Day Mindfulness Challenge  curriculum.

We’re pleased to invite you to participate in a 30 Day Mindfulness Challenge beginning any Monday.

This online training takes just five minutes a day, anytime, anywhere and on any device, yet there is evidence that it lowers stress, increases resilience, improves teamwork, and strengthens leadership skills.

The Challenge teaches ‘mindfulness-in-action’ so people don’t need to stop what they are doing to become calmer, present and more focused, all of which lead to a happier, healthier work environment.

Watch this short video to learn more about the Challenge.

Registration

All RRC students, staff and faculty can click on the link http://bit.ly/RRC30Day to register for the Challenge. You can even register a buddy to keep you motivated.

If you have any questions about the 30 Day Mindfulness Challenge or need any help registering, please email register@mindwellu.com and the Challenge tech team will get back to you. Your RRC contacts for this are Jacqueline Wood and Breanna Sawatzky.