Social learning is based on constructivist or social constructivist theories.

Constructivism bases itself on cognitive principles, extending them to view learning as a learner’s personal construction of knowledge and meaning based on their own experiences (Driscoll, 387). This view of education implies that learning depends on the context in which it was acquired. Learners must be empowered to take ownership of their own learning process, pursue personally meaningful learning goals, metacognitively regulate themselves in their learning, and perform critical thinking.  A major element of this kind of learning is that social negotiation between learners exposes them to different perspectives and strengthens their personal mental schema.

References

Driscoll, M.P. (2005). Psychology of learning for instruction. Boston: Pearson Education