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“Motivation Mondays” Workshops Series for Students – Starting March 7th!

March 4, 2022

Starting March 7th, the Academic Success Centre (LAS) is kicking off it’s second Motivation Mondays workshop series of the term! We’ve scheduled six new interactive 30-minute workshops – bright and early – to support students in finishing their Winter term strong.

Our facilitators will provide students with active learning strategies and tools to enhance their academic success and pose discussion questions to encourage self-reflection and goal setting for the remainder of the term.

Students can pre-register by clicking the links below:

Questions? Please contact the Academic Success Centre at tutoring@rrc.ca.

Written by Melissa Coyle, Academic Support Coordinator

Get More Nursing Reference Center with Plus

February 28, 2022

Nursing Reference Center Plus isn’t your typical reference database. Instead, it is an evidence-based, point-of-care information resource. Unlike UpToDate, it is designed specifically for nurses.

Nursing Reference Center Plus has many unique features. For example, you can use NRC+ to:

  • Access Evidence-Based Care sheets, Care Plans and Quick Lessons on diseases and conditions
  • Read clinical papers and access competency checklists on skills and procedures
  • Find Cultural Competency documents that cover key considerations in providing culturally competent care to specific groups
  • Search two trusted drug collections simultaneously for monographs and drug-related topics
  • Catch up on the latest in essential nursing leadership and management topics such as assessing competencies, developing leadership skills and succession planning, fostering employees, organizational change, Interprofessionalism and more
  • Learn more with interactive learning continuing education (CE) modules
  • Access research instruments and scales
  • Quickly refer to thousands of eBooks
  • Access printable, easy-to-read patient education handouts
  • Find images of conditions
  • Watch skills videos that demonstrate procedures
  • Access NRC+ on the go with the mobile app

Did you think we already had all of that? Not quite.

The Library recently upgraded its Nursing Reference Center databases subscription to Plus. So, why is this a big deal? Here are a few of the advantages of Plus:

Nursing Reference CentreNRCNRC+
Care Plans057
Core Measure Topics059
Cultural Competency Topics110270
Images1401,300
Leadership & Management CE Topics23230
Management Topics70440
Mobile AppNOYES
Nursing Skills & Procedures and Competency Checklists2,3004,900
Patient Education Handouts3,3008,900
Regulatory Topics0290
Risk Management Topics80220
Videos0757

“Sounds awesome; how do I learn more,” you ask? Let me show you!

Library Guide

The Nursing Reference Center Plus Guide(https://library.rrc.ca/NRC-PLUS) is chock-full of screenshots and clear instructions to guide you through everything you need to know to master using this database.

Would you prefer to watch a 30-minute lecture?

Lunch & Learn Live Webinars

Join us for our next Nursing Reference Centre PLUS (database) webinar in May 2022 to see the database in action. We will spend 30 minutes exploring the different facets of what makes this database unique, and you will have the opportunity to ask questions.

Registration and more information

Can’t wait until May?

Recorded Lunch & Learn Webinars

Our recorded webinars give you the best of both worlds with an accessible recorded video format on demand. In addition, the closed-captioned recording is only 19 minutes long.

We have also included the PowerPoint for the webinar for your convenience.

Still have questions?

Send me a message, I would be happy to answer your questions or set up a one-on-one tutorial.

(Instructors, feel free to link to any of these resources in your LEARN content.)

PubMed Biomedical databaseGuideLunch & Learn
CINAHL Nursing databaseGuide   Lunch & Learn
CPS Full Access Pharmaceutical database Guide   Lunch & Learn
UpToDate Point-of Care Clinical databaseGuideLunch & Learn

For more information, please contact Rosemary Woodby, Reference Technician

Freedom to Read Week

February 24, 2022

It’s Freedom to Read Week and libraries across Canada are talking about intellectual freedom.

What is Freedom to Read week about? It’s about protecting intellectual freedom, access to information, and freedom of expression.

This year, Freedom to Read week falls during a time when the persistent controversy in the southern states around LGBTT+ literature is upsurging and making headlines, with many books being challenged, banned, and removed from school libraries. It’s important, even in Canada, to remember that book banning, and the oppression of free expression are not issues of the past, that they are ongoing, global issues.

Please take advantage of the Libraries collections this Freedom to Read Week and celebrate your freedom to express and share ideas with others.


Gender & sexuality : Canadian history through the stories of activists

Gender and Sexuality unearths a diverse spectrum of struggle through the accounts of longstanding activists and social movements participants.

Main Stacks NDC HQ 73.3 .C3 N45 2012

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know about Trans (but Were Afraid to Ask)

Leading activist and essayist Brynn Tannehill tells you everything you ever wanted to know about transgender issues but were afraid to ask.

EBook, Available online

Queer Africa: New and Collected Fiction

Queer Africa is a collection of unapologetic, tangled, tender, funny, bruising and brilliant stories about the many ways in which we love each other on the continent In these unafraid stories of intimacy.

Ebook, Available Online

Out proud : stories of pride, courage, and social justice

Produced in partnership with Egale Canada Human Rights Trust, Out Proud: Stories of Pride, Courage, and Social Justice is the second in a series of essay anthologies designed to give attention to issues that are sometimes ignored in the mainstream media–and a voice to those most closely affected by them.

Main Stacks NDC HQ 73.3 .C3 O88 2014

Prairie fairies : a history of queer communities and people in western Canada, 1930-1985

Prairie Fairies draws upon a wealth of oral, archival, and cultural histories to recover the experiences of queer urban and rural people in the prairies. 

Main Stacks EDC HQ 73.3 .C2 P735 2018
Ebook, Available Online

Trans People in Higher Education

While more trans students, faculty, and staff have come out on US college campuses today than ever before, many still report enduring harassment and discrimination.

Ebook, Available Online

LGBTQAI+ Books for Children and Teens : providing a window for all

This resource gives school librarians, children’s, and YA librarians the guidance and tools they need to confidently share these books with the patrons they support.

Ebook, Available Online


This year the College launched the new Gender and Sexual Identities: Advancing Understanding and Inclusion Training for RRC Polytech employees.

“This self-directed training aims to enhance Red River College Polytechnic employees’ understanding of gender and sexual diversity identities, and provide strategies for advancing inclusion.”

Libraries are responsible to provide and protect access to information, even those ideas and materials considered controversial or distasteful to some. CFLA FCAB Statement on Intellectual Freedom and Libraries

Written by Artemis Hedrich, Reference Technician

Using Copyright Content Fairly

February 16, 2022

copyright symbol

We find and interact with materials online everyday and most of that online content we interact with is protected by Copyright. “So much of our normal everyday behavior puts us at risk of infringing copyright, especially since so much of our life is digital.”[i] “The copyright regime cannot be considered fit for the digital age when millions of citizens are in daily breach of copyright, simply for shifting a piece of music or video from one device to another. People are confused about what is allowed and what is not with the risk that the law falls into disrepute.”[ii]

February 21 – 25th marks Fair Dealing week a time to highlight user rights, and promote the opportunities presented by the Fair Dealing provision of the Copyright act. During this week we aim to explain Fair Dealing and how it applies to our daily uses of copyright materials.

As part of Fair Dealing week the video guide to Fair Dealing posted above has been created. The the RRC Polytech Copyright officer. The video touches on the basics of exercising user rights in relation to Education, Private Study, and Research in the video.

How we engage with copyright materials matters. As students and educators are not only individuals who use content, but are also creators of content. Fair Dealing is the doctrine that balances the right of users and creators and allows the navigation of user and creator rights for innovation that benefits society at large.

“So much of our normal everyday behavior puts us at risk of infringing copyright, especially since so much of our life is digital.”

-Stan Muller

The RRC Polytech Library is dedicated to helping students, faculty and staff, navigate our institutional copyright policy. We offer a Fair Dealing tool to help streamline policy navigation and help ensure copying is in accordance with our policy guidelines. If you need to make a copy check out this quiz based tool!

The library also hosts a suite of copyright support services to help inform staff and students toempower those within our college community to make copyright decisions that exercise their user rights and respect the rights of creators in accordance with our policy.

Copyrights services include: Digitization, Course package review, copyright and open educational resource outreach, course material assessment, open educational resource consultation, and copyright consultation.

To learn more about copyright be sure to check out our copyright resource pages on the RRC Polytech library website. For copyright support or assistance at any point get in touch with the RRC Copyright Officer.

Happy Fair Dealing Week.

——————————————————————————————————————–

[i] Muller, Stan. Crash Course Intellectual Property #3: Copyright, Exceptions and Fair Use.

[ii] Hargreaves, Ian. Digital Opportunity: A Review of Intellectual Property and Growth. UK Intellectual Property Office. P 5

NEW! Immersive Stories Program: Wednesdays at Noon (March 2 – April 6)

February 14, 2022

Red River College Polytechnic is a diverse student and employee community, with Diversity, Equity and Inclusion as one of three commitments in our new Strategic Plan. However, as human beings, we all have hardwired unconscious biases that can affect our learning and working relationships and our actions can then affect our efforts towards diversity, equity and inclusion.

What is Immersive Stories?

In the context of March 21, International Day against Discrimination, the new Immersive Stories Program will present a series of five one-hour lunchtime sessions.

The Immersive Stories Program is designed to give students, faculty, and staff a first-hand opportunity to gain knowledge and understanding about multi-layered socio-cultural identities and lived experiences. As outlined in our new Strategic Plan, this program is part of the College’s commitment to Truth and Reconciliation, and the pursuit of equity, diversity and inclusion in everything we do.

Participants will develop skills that will allow them to regularly check their personal, social, and cultural assumptions so that they can avoid making quick conclusions and judgments. This in turn will help to foster a diverse and inclusive College environment for students and faculty.  

Each session in the Immersive Stories Program will involve a discussion with a member of our RRC Polytech community, during which they will share their unique lived experiences, and invite participant questions and dialogue. These conversations will provide participants an opportunity to gain insights into the lived experiences of our diverse community and will assist in becoming aware of our own biases.

Join us for the following meaningful conversations which will be held on Webex. Participants are welcome to register for up to five sessions in March and April 2022.

Immersive Stories - guest speaker Vassan Aruljothi

Wednesday, March 2 | 12 noon

GUEST: Vassan Aruljothi
HOST: Kaleigh Quinn

Conversation topics: Racism, Discrimination in Malaysia, Deodorant and international students, Racism among people of colour, Effects of colonialism.


Immersive Stories - guest speaker Jocelyne Olson

Wednesday, March 9 | 12 noon

GUEST: Jocelyne Olson
HOST: Rebecca Hiebert

Conversation topics: Barriers to participation, Neurodivergent change management, Teaching with ADHD, Navigating the workplace, Inaccessible accessibility.


Immersive Stories - guest speaker Anihita Aminan

Wednesday, March 23 | 12 noon 

GUEST: Anahita Aminian
HOST: Nora Sobel

Conversation topics: My Ethnicity, My Family, My Religious Journey, My Education and my Approach to Early Childhood Education, My Language and Communication Skills.


Immersive Stories - guest speaker Ebony Novakowski

Wednesday, March 30 | 12 noon 

GUEST: Ebony Novakowski
HOST: Sarah Lee

Conversation topics: My Sexual Orientation, Morbid Obesity and experienced perceptions, Chronic Illness and Polycystic Kidney Disease, My gender and sexual orientation in relation to work experience, My Family and Religion.


Wednesday, April 6 | 12 noon 

GUEST: Marshall Richard
HOST: Rebecca Hiebert

Conversation topics: Intergenerational trauma, Effects of Colonization, Social Inequities, Racism, Reclaiming Indigenous identities.


Please note that in order to create a safe and brave space for presenters and participants, only the introductions of the presentations will be recorded.


This program is brought to you by the Diversity & Inclusion Working Group within Library and Academic Services, with the support of the Diversity and Inclusion Specialist, Human Resources Services, and Education Technology Vision (eTV).

Reinventing the Wheel — Two guides get reworked

February 10, 2022

The Library re-launched two guides early this year. In partnership with the Academic Success Center, we have enhanced and expanded these guides with new content and updated resources.

The new Academic Writing and Citation (https://library.rrc.ca/academic_writing) guide expands on the previous Getting Started with Academic Writing guide. It now incorporates original content from the ASC Writing Centre (https://library.rrc.ca/writing_students) as well as content from the Citation and the Moving from APA6 to APA7 guides (now retired).

This guide can assist you in understanding how to write your papers better, increase your fluency with APA 7 and other citation styles, and learn about plagiarism and how to avoid it.

Screenshot of Academic Writing and Citation Guide website

The updated Academic Study Skills (https://library.rrc.ca/academic_skills) guide builds on our original Study Skills guide with original content from the ASC’s Academic Coaching and Study Skills pages.

Here you will find strategies for time management, reading and note-taking, study skills, and test-taking. This guide can help to increase your understanding of course material, improve your marks, and make learning a little less stressful.

Screenshot Academic Study Skills Guide homepage.

Both of these guides are located in the Student Success folder of the Guides page (https://library.rrc.ca/StudentSuccess)

Each guide contains tons of helpful advice along with links to books, ebooks, videos, streaming videos, websites, self-directed tutorials and much more.

A big thank you to Nora Sobel, Nick Schroeder, and Dayna Graham for working with myself and Fatima DeMelo to update, release, and promote these fantastic resources.

For more information, please contact Rosemary Woodby or Fatima DeMelo, Reference Technicians

Students write haikus to connect a 1000-crane mobile with course content

February 9, 2022

The following poems were submitted by students in the Summer 2021 EA Program Intake following the completion of a group project — a mobile made of 1000 paper cranes.

When the 1000-crane mobile was completed, the class met Elder Una Swan for a second pipe ceremony to bring the project to a close. The first pipe ceremony occurred 14 weeks earlier with Miss Una blessing the project.

Each student wrote a haiku as part of the ELA Content & Practice course. Writing the poems helped them connect the project experience with a learning outcome from the course. As students gazed at their origami mobile of 1000 cranes, they were inspired to write the following words:

Origami fused with project-based learning

Paul Bourget, who designed this project, explains:

The goal of the origami project is to show the possibilities of actively involving students in an art form that links the principles of Reconciliation and understanding of the EA program course concepts such as math, ELA. 

–Paul Bourget, instructor

The 1000-crane mobile: significance of colours

The colours of the 1000-crane mobile (pictured below) are thoughtfully chosen, incorporating the 4 directions of Traditional Teachings (red, black, yellow, white in top layer) and “Every Child Matters” (orange in bottom layer), as well as diversity of peoples joined in harmony (multiple colours in middle layer).

Photo of the 1000-crane mobile
Photo of the 1000-crane mobile

An act to follow

Many thanks to Paul Bourget for sharing this project, and inspiring the RRC Polytech community to be innovative in incorporating Truth and Reconciliation and the Calls to Action into our work at the College. Learn more about Paul Bourget’s work here: Truth and Reconciliation Faculty Star: Paul Bourget.

Written by Paul Bourget, EA instructor; edited by Linda Fox — Library Technician, Program Support and Promotion; poems by students in the Educational Assistant program (summer 2021 intake)

Learn About Black History with Library Resources and More!

February 1, 2022

This post originally appeared on February 8, 2021.

February is Black History Month, a time to celebrate the achievements and contributions of Black Canadians through history. They have helped make Canada the culturally diverse, compassionate and prosperous nation it is today. This special compilation of streaming videos and other resources is designed to help you learn more about Black history.

Deeply Rooted

Deeply Rooted cover art

Filmmaker Cazhhmere is a seventh-generation black Canadian. Despite this deep history, she’s constantly asked to explain where she’s from — even though the answer is always “Canada.” Cazhhmere is a proud Canadian. Her ancestors were among the first black settlers to come to Canada — her family has spent hundreds of years weaving itself into the fabric of our nation. Despite this deep history, Cazhhmere is constantly questioned about where she is originally from. In Deeply Rooted, Cazhhmere will change your perception of what a multi-generational Canadian family looks like. In a country that is widely known for being a “global melting pot,” our nation can easily forget that not every person of colour is a newcomer to Canada.

Invisible City 

Invisible city cover art

The film is set in the inner-city housing project of Toronto’s Regent Park; Kendell and Mikey, like their surroundings are in the process of transformation; the environment and social pressures tempting them to make poor choices, their mothers and mentors rooting for them to succeed. Turning his camera on the often-ignored inner city, Academy-award nominated director Hubert Davis sensitively depicts the disconnection of urban poverty and race from the mainstream.

Hardwood

Hardwood cover art

Hardwood is a personal journey by director Hubert Davis, the son of former Harlem Globetrotter Mel Davis, who explores how his father’s decisions affected his life and those of his extended family. Elegantly structured into three chapters entitled “love,” “recollection” and “redemption,” Davis uses personal interviews, archival footage and home movies to delve into his father’s past in the hope of finding a new direction for his own.

Mighty Jerome

Mighty Jerome cover art

In 1959, at just 19, Harry Jerome was Canada’s most promising track and field star on his way to the Olympics in Rome. By 1962, after suffering a gruesome leg injury, there was every reason to think that his racing days were over. But Jerome was not just a champion on the track; he was doubly determined off it. And so began his climb to what his coach, Bill Bowerman, called “the greatest comeback in track and field history.”

The Skin We’re In

Skin we're in cover art

Urgent, controversial and undeniably honest, The Skin We’re In is a wake-up call to complacent Canadians. Racism is here. It is everywhere. It is us and we are it. Following celebrated journalist Desmond Cole as he researches his hotly anticipated book, this documentary from acclaimed director Charles Officer pulls back the curtain on racism in Canada.

Explore Black History on the Web

If you ever have the time and interest in exploring Black history, there are many websites worth checking out. Here you will find a combination of historical images and true stories that bring Black history and culture to life.

Various websites

Canadian Museum for Human Rights Stories

Video Collections from Curio.ca and NFB

Browse the Library’s e-book collection

Browse the e-book collection: Black History

Have a question or suggestion? Connect with us!

To connect with us through our online service desk, simply visit library.rrc.ca and click on the Ask Us button. We’d love to hear from you!

Follow us on social media!

For everything from fun series to service and programming updates, follow us on social media. We’re active on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

Written by Linda Fox – Library Technician, Program Support and Promotion

Winter Break Reading

December 14, 2021

With the upcoming Winter Break, hopefully we can all have some downtime to relax! If the weather cooperates, we can enjoy some fresh air activities like walking, skating, or skiing. Once back inside, curling up with a good book and a hot drink will warm us up!

RRC Polytech Library has many great choices of award-winning books (and short-list finalists) in our collection. Here is just a sampling of some of those titles.

Washington Black by Esi Edugyan

Winner of the Scotiabank Giller Prize for fiction, 2018

Book Cover Washington BlackWhen two English brothers arrive at a Barbados sugar plantation, they bring with them a darkness beyond what the slaves have already known. Washington Black – an eleven year-old field slave – is horrified to find himself chosen to live in the quarters of one of these men. But the man is not as Washington expects him to be. His new master is the eccentric Christopher Wilde – naturalist, explorer, inventor and abolitionist – whose obsession to perfect a winged flying machine disturbs all who know him. Washington is initiated into a world of wonder: a world where the night sea is set alight with fields of jellyfish, where a simple cloth canopy can propel a man across the sky, where even a boy born in chains may embrace a life of dignity and meaning – and where two people, separated by an impossible divide, can begin to see each other as human.

How to Pronounce Knife: Stories by Souvankham Thammavongsa

Winner of the Scotiabank Giller Prize for fiction, 2020

 Book Cover How to Pronounce KnifeHow to Pronounce Knife is a stunning collection of stories that portray the immigrant experience in achingly beautiful prose. The emotional expanse chronicled in this collection is truly remarkable. These stories are vessels of hope, of hurt, of rejection, of loss and of finding one’s footing in a new and strange land. Thammavongsa’s fiction cuts to the core of the immigrant reality like a knife—however you pronounce it.

 

 

 

 

The Glass Hotel by Emily St. John Mandel

Shortlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, 2020

From the award-winning author of Station Eleven, a captivating novel of money, beauty, white-collar crime, ghosts and moral compromise in which a woman disappears from a container ship off the coast of Mauritania and a massive Ponzi scheme implodes in New York, dragging countless fortunes with it. Vincent is a bartender at the Hotel Caiette, a five-star glass-and-cedar palace on the northernmost tip of Vancouver Island. New York financier Jonathan Alkaitis owns the hotel. When he passes Vincent his card with a tip, it’s the beginning of their life together. That same day, a hooded figure scrawls a note on the windowed wall of the hotel: “Why don’t you swallow broken glass.” Leon Prevant, a shipping executive for a company called Neptune-Avramidis, sees the note from the hotel bar and is shaken to his core. Thirteen years later, Vincent mysteriously disappears from the deck of a Neptune-Avramidis ship. Weaving together the lives of these characters, The Glass Hotel moves between the ship, the skyscrapers of Manhattan and the wilderness of remote British Columbia, painting a breathtaking picture of greed and guilt, fantasy and delusion, art and the ghosts of our pasts.

Son of a Trickster by Eden Robinson

Shortlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize 2017

Book cover Son of a TricksterEveryone knows a guy like Jared: the burnout kid in high school who sells weed cookies and has a scary mom who’s often wasted and wielding some kind of weapon. Jared does smoke and drink too much, and he does make the best cookies in town, and his mom is a mess, but he’s also a kid who has an immense capacity for compassion and an impulse to watch over people more than twice his age, and he can’t rely on anyone for consistent love and support, except for his flatulent pit bull, Baby Killer (he calls her Baby)–and now she’s dead. Jared can’t count on his mom to stay sober and stick around to take care of him. He can’t rely on his dad to pay the bills and support his new wife and step-daughter. Jared is only sixteen but feels like he is the one who must stabilize his family’s life, even look out for his elderly neighbours. But he struggles to keep everything afloat … and sometimes he blacks out. And he puzzles over why his maternal grandmother has never liked him, why she says he’s the son of a trickster, that he isn’t human. Mind you, ravens speak to him–even when he’s not stoned. You think you know Jared, but you don’t.

From the Ashes: my story of being Métis, Homeless, and Finding My Way
by Jesse Thistle

Indigenous Voices Award winner, 2020
Canada Reads contender, 2020

Book Cover From the AshesFrom the Ashes is a remarkable memoir about hope and resilience, and a revelatory look into the life of a Métis-Cree man who refused to give up. Abandoned by his parents as a toddler, Jesse Thistle briefly found himself in the foster-care system with his two brothers, cut off from all they had known. Eventually the children landed in the home of their paternal grandparents, but their tough-love attitudes meant conflicts became commonplace. And the ghost of Jesse’s drug-addicted father haunted the halls of the house and the memories of every family member. Struggling, Jesse succumbed to a self-destructive cycle of drug and alcohol addiction and petty crime, spending more than a decade on and off the streets, often homeless. One day, he finally realized he would die unless he turned his life around. In this heartwarming and heartbreaking memoir, Jesse Thistle writes honestly and fearlessly about his painful experiences with abuse, uncovering the truth about his parents, and how he found his way back into the circle of his Indigenous culture and family through education. An eloquent exploration of what it means to live in a world surrounded by prejudice and racism and to be cast adrift, From the Ashes is, in the end, about how love and support can help one find happiness despite the odds.

Injichaag : My Soul in Story : Anishinaabe Poetics in Art and Words by Rene Meshake (ebook)

Winner of Indigenous Voices Award for Works in an Indigenous Language, 2020

Book Cover my soul in storyThis book shares the life story of Anishinaabe artist Rene Meshake in stories, poetry, and Anishinaabemowin “word bundles” that serve as a dictionary of Ojibwe poetics. Meshake was born in the railway town of Nakina in northwestern Ontario in 1948, and spent his early years living off-reserve with his grandmother in a matriarchal land-based community he calls Pagwashing. He was raised through his grandmother’s “bush university,” periodically attending Indian day school, but at the age of ten Rene was scooped into the Indian residential school system, where he suffered sexual abuse as well as the loss of language and connection to family and community. This residential school experience was lifechanging, as it suffocated his artistic expression and resulted in decades of struggle and healing. Now in his twenty-eighth year of sobriety, Rene is a successful multidisciplinary artist, musician and writer. Meshake’s artistic vision and poetic lens provide a unique telling of a story of colonization and recovery. The material is organized thematically around a series of Meshake’s paintings. It is framed by Kim Anderson, Rene’s Odaanisan (adopted daughter), a scholar of oral history who has worked with Meshake for two decades. Full of teachings that give a glimpse of traditional Anishinaabek lifeways and worldviews, Injichaag: My Soul in Story is “more than a memoir.”

Five Wives: a novel by Joan Thomas

Winner of the Governor General’s Literary Award for English Language Fiction, 2019

Book cover Five WivesIn 1956, a small group of evangelical Christian missionaries and their families journeyed to the rainforest in Ecuador intending to convert the Waorani, a people who had never had contact with the outside world. The plan was known as Operation Auca. After spending days dropping gifts from an aircraft, the five men in the party rashly entered the “intangible zone.” They were all killed, leaving their wives and children to fend for themselves.
Five Wives is the fictionalized account of the real-life women who were left behind, and their struggles – with grief, with doubt, and with each other – as they continued to pursue their evangelical mission in the face of the explosion of fame that followed their husbands’ deaths.
Five Wives is a riveting, often wrenching story of evangelism and its legacy, teeming with atmosphere and compelling characters and rich in emotional impact.

When We Were Alone by David Robertson, illustrated by Julie Flett

Winner of Governor General’s Literary Award, Young People’s Literature (Illustrated Books), 2017

Book Cover When we were aloneWhen a young girl helps tend to her grandmother’s garden, she begins to notice things that make her curious. Why does her grandmother have long, braided hair and beautifully colored clothing? Why does she speak another language and spend so much time with her family? As she asks her grandmother about these things, she is told about life in a residential school a long time ago, where all of these things were taken away. When We Were Alone is a story about a difficult time in history, and, ultimately, one of empowerment and strength.

Testing and Assessment Centre opens at Manitou a bi Bii daziigae

December 8, 2021

With each passing day, more pieces are coming together in the new Testing and Assessment Centre based in Manitou a bi Bii daziigae. Boxes are unpacked, rooms are being used, and filing systems being honed. Most importantly, students are coming in! We have been running in-person assessments for multiple programs, including Nursing, Allied Health Sciences, Aircraft Maintenance Engineering, special admissions, and more.

The new location of the Testing and Assessment Centre located in Manitou a bi Bii daziigae.

Last week we warmly welcomed Jena-Lee Misanchuk as the new manager of the Testing and Assessment Centre. Everyone on the team is very excited to have Jena join us, and we look forward to a productive and enriching time working together. Jena has just the kind of experience and expertise to help the Testing and Assessment Centre fulfill its boundless potential.

Collaboration is the name of the new game in Manitou a bi Bii daziigae, and we have been doing that in spades. Assessment Services has been supporting the LTC in their placement testing for the second time, with the latest installment showing all the benefits of prior experience (i.e., it’s going pretty well). The wonderful people in Exam Accommodations joined forces with Assessment Services to enable a prospective student to sit a special admissions exam, and the new members of the unit from Continuing and Distance Education are integrating seamlessly.

Finally, as you can see in the photo, we are celebrating the upcoming holiday season with gusto!

Written by Piers Smettem, Assessment Specialist