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What’s the difference between copyright and academic integrity?

October 18, 2021

Copyright Officer Ebony Novakowski and Academic Integrity Specialist Lisa Vogt talk about their roles at RRC Polytech. 

Ebony: Sometimes people ask me what the difference is between copyright and academic integrity. Does that happen to you?  

Lisa: Yes, sometimes people wonder if our roles are essentially the same. I think our work is quite different, although there are points where we overlap. Why don’t you tell me what being a Copyright Officer is all about? 

Ebony: Copyright literally means the “right to copy” and generally refers to the exclusive right to produce or reproduce a work, or any substantial part of one. In Canada this right is enshrined in the Copyright Act.  

Being the Copyright Officer at RRC Polytech is about raising awareness of Copyright, helping our staff and students navigate our institutional Copyright Policies. This enables them to interact with copyright materials as users and creators of content within our guidelines at RRC Polytech. Lisa, can you tell me about your work in Academic Integrity? 

Lisa: As an Academic Integrity Specialist, my goal is to strengthen our institutional culture for academic integrity. I create educational resources that draw from the six fundamental values of honesty, trust, respect, responsibility, fairness, and courage. Building on these values teaches students the importance of demonstrating their own knowledge, skills, and abilities, and enhances the quality of education at RRC Polytech. Academic integrity values established through post-secondary education pave the way for students to be more successful in their future professions. 

Are the policies around academic integrity and copyright the same at RRC Polytech? 

Ebony: Lisa and I operate under different policies. The current policies that govern copyright at RRC Polytech are the P7 Fair Dealing policy and A10 Intellectual Property and Copyright policy.  

Lisa: The S4 Academic Integrity Policy outlines the expectations for academic integrity and the procedures to follow when academic integrity has been violated.  

Ebony: Our policies around Copyright at RRC Polytech are informed by the Copyright Act of Canada and there is a lot of interesting copyright case law across Canada and globally regarding Copyright. For example, between 2011 and 2018, a series of disputes took place about the copyright status of “monkey selfies” taken by macaques who stole equipment belonging to the British nature photographer David Slater and photographed themselves. In April 2018, the US appeals court affirmed that animals cannot legally hold copyrights in the US. Lisa are there any laws that apply to Academic Integrity in Canada? 

Lisa: First of all, the “monkey selfies” case you described is fascinating! This is a good demonstration of the difference in our work. When it comes to Academic Integrity Canadian students must follow the rules set by their school’s policies in order to continue as a student of that institution, as there are no laws governing academic integrity in Canada. Although, I can recall at least one Canadian case where the RCMP was called after a student sent an impersonator to write their exam. In contrast, New Zealand, Australia, and the United Kingdom have laws prohibiting the advertising and sale of completed academic work through services often called ‘essay mills.’  

Where are points of overlap in copyright and academic integrity? 

Ebony: Instructor resources, such as assignments, lesson plans, and slides are all Copyright material. Sharing these resources outside the context of your coursework, such as on a file sharing site, without express permission can violate the copyrights of the work as well as academic integrity. It is important to remember that instructor materials as well as traditionally published materials such as your textbook are Copyright works and subject to the Copyright Act of Canada as well as our copyright policies at RRC Polytech. 

Lisa: Exactly! When students share their assignment files online, both you and I are concerned as the student is violating copyright AND creating opportunities for academic misconduct. Students who take someone else’s work and submit it as their own, violates the RRC Polytech S4 Academic Integrity policy. And, if an instructor finds their assignment or answers to an assignment have been shared publicly, they may request the removal these documents to maintain their copyright and reduce the risk for academic misconduct. 

Another area of overlap is Open or Creative Commons materials. Researchers and practitioners in the academic integrity community often apply Creative Commons licenses to resources that can be shared. So when you and I connect, we usually talk about appropriate sharing of information – either materials that can be shared broadly or materials that should not have been shared broadly. 

Ebony: Appropriate information sharing is important, it would be very difficult to learn anything without sharing information, what both our positions seek to do is ensure that when materials are shared this is done in an honest and legal manner that supports learning. That means respecting copyright law and academic integrity and being aware of our policies here at RRC Polytech. International Open Access Week is a time for the wider community to coordinate in taking action to make openness the default for research and to ensure that equity is at the center of this work. Open Access Week is from October 25th through the 31st.

Lisa: Exactly! As members of a learning community, we need to work together respectfully. We do this by completing our own work and giving credit for the source of ideas or materials that are not ours. Sharing becomes a problem if someone presents the work of another as if it were their own. This week, educators across Canada are recognizing Academic Integrity Week to promote academic integrity in post-secondary education.

What are some of the different services that are offered by the Copyright Officer and Academic Integrity Specialist? 

Ebony: I conduct copyright outreach to faculty and provide Copyright Consultations for instructors and students who wish to use specific copyright materials. I can be booked by instructors for in class workshops on the basics of copyright and intellectual property for students. I can also assist instructors in finding open resources to use for teaching and instruction. Open or Creative Commons materials have less copyright restrictions which can serve both instructors and students who need to adapt and reuse materials. 

Lisa: Supporting faculty and students in a learning environment that builds on the six fundamental values is the heart of my work. I offer a series of resources that instructors can use to integrate academic integrity into class discussions, including an interactive module and presentation slides. I also deliver workshops to support the development of academic integrity in classes. Instructors can request a consultation to determine the best approach or ask questions on what to do when academic misconduct is suspected. When academic misconduct occurs, I advise on how to respond so the learning process can continue for both student and instructor.  

How can you access our services and supports?  

Lisa: To learn more about academic integrity services at RRC Polytech, you can request a consultation here

Ebony:  More information on copyright please visit Library Copyright Page under Faculty Supports  or contact me by e-mail with questions at any time. Instructors can also book me as a guest speaker for their class.

Library Website Built with Users in Mind

September 15, 2021

New Library Website - September 2021

Last spring, if you were to look at our old Library website, you would be looking at a somewhat dated “Library-centric” web, with two Academic Support departments, and new features, i.e., LibAnswers and LibCal, tacked on. We knew our web site was due to be reorganized, and at the same time given a fresh look and feel. As with many changes, the summer period  gave us a window of opportunity when there was a break in classes. How could we take advantage of this opportunity and create a new-look website designed with our users in mind?

User-centric Design

We began by looking toward user-centric design principles that have been the cornerstone of effective web design for decades. Some web sites look great, but are completely ineffective to their users. We wanted to avoid this, and achieve a greater level of usability. So, we began by studying users.

On our Library web site, the greatest metric we had were analytics of what users did on our site. Where did they go? What did they click on? Generally, top traffic resources on our website were: OneSearch, A-Z List, Ask Us, the Academic Services landing page, Tutoring, Supports for Students, Library Subject Guides, Workshops, Self-Directed Learning Modules, Stem Centre, and College Readiness.

We took this information as a starting point, and began to develop two personas that represent Library web users: Average Student User and Average Instructor User.

Built with Library users in mind

PERSONA 1:
Average Student User
wants to…

  • Average Student UserDiscover and borrow Library materials.
  • Browse for Academic Supports.
  • Access digital resources such as electronic articles and databases.
  • Discover and attend Library and ASC workshops.
  • Refer to a course-related subject guide.
  • Access Tutoring services.
  • Access a Library service.
  • See when the Library is open.
  • Find study space.
  • Book AV equipment, laptops and chargers.
  • Locate an instructor-recommended resource.
  • Ask a question or get help.
  • Learn how to cite.

PERSONA 2:
Average Instructor User
wants to…

  • Average Instructor UserDiscover Library materials and resources for planning, research
    and teaching.
  • Set up course reserves.
  • Access a Library service such as ILL or Digitization.
  • Refer their students to Library or ASC workshops.
  • Refer their students to specific ASC resources.
  • Request materials for their courses and students, i.e., Suggest a Purchase.
  • Book AV equipment, laptops and chargers.
  • Find copyright information and help.
  • Get Academic Integrity advice and assistance.
  • Ask a question or get help.

Redesign Process

With these two personas in mind, we began a three phase process.

Phase 1: Content reorganization. A cross section of library staff were brought together to make decisions about the web site organization and hierarchy. With our user personas in mind, staff individually performed card sorting exercises and compared results. This group also investigated other academic Library web sites. The final product was a new main menu structure, built with users in mind.

New Library Nav Bar

Phase 2: Home page re-design. With our users in mind, a second working group reviewed the information and features on the current Library home, and formulated a plan to build a more modern and concise home page. This group also took the time to review other academic websites, and recommended features which we could adopt for our new home page.

Phase 3: Overall web site re-skin. A smaller team of experts worked on a new header, footer and colours for the new site. The goal was to give the new Library web site a fresh look, new colours, and improvement in accessibility.

A cornerstone of this project was to involve many people from across Library and Academic Services. Each one of the above teams consisted of different people, thus enhancing our staff’s ability to influence decisions made in the new web site design. Their awesome contributions are reflected throughout the new web site.

Technical Details

The website is built on the LibGuides CMS platform by Springshare. Pages on this platform are responsive (mobile-friendly) through the Bootstrap framework. We have also taken advantage of other Springshare platforms such as LibAnswers, LibWizard and LibCal. We needed to add custom CSS and JavaScript for many of the features we built, however the Springshare platform allows for a sufficient level of customization.

The site is built with accessibility in mind, and accomplished through accessibility features built in to the LibGuides platform, and attention to detail in the added customizations. Our current home page tests as 100% accessible in the Google Lighthouse tool.

Looking Forward

We are planning focus groups this fall, where we hope to further determine how our patrons use our web site, and gauge the effectiveness of our new site design. In doing so, we expect slight revisions to the current web site, and an update of our personas.

Story by Mark Nelson ~ Library Systems Specialist

Highlights of #RRCLongNight2021

April 12, 2021

Thank you to all of the staff and students who attended the virtual Long Night Against Procrastination on Wednesday, April 7, 2021. It was an encouraging evening, where students benefited from help desks, workshops, and wellness activities. The evening commenced with a Welcome Session in which Bettina Allen and Alan Chorney gave a quick tour of the event. Fred Meier gave a short speech, providing a dose of encouraging words and Elder Una said a blessing which set the tone for an uplifting evening.

A total of 54 students registered for the event. The most popular sessions were the Writing Help Desk hosted by Academic Success Centre, the Kahoot Game put on by RRCSA, and the workshop “Job Search: What Gets You Hired” presented by Student Employment Services. Congratulations go out to Riley Pritchard, who won the prize draw for a $20 gift card!

We have a few staff photos to share with you. As you can see, we had a lot of fun with virtual backgrounds!

 

To our students:

Our thoughts are with you, as you wrap up the term and set out to find employment and apply the skills you’ve acquired at RRC. We wish you opportunities that land within the paths of your dreams. Best of luck!

Six Quick Tips for Using the RRC Library Online

January 18, 2021

Tip 1: Our Website

Your key to accessing the online Library is the Library’s website. From academic supports and services to resources and news, this is the gateway to everything related to the Library. Click the button below to check it out.

Library button

Tip 2: Our Online Service Desk

Access our online service desk by clicking on the Ask Us bubble on the Library’s website. This begins a chat with a real person in real-time during regular Library hours. If you submit a question after hours, you will receive a response when the Library opens again. You may also browse common answers to our most popular questions here: Popular questions.

Tip 3: Our Digital Collection

Explore our digital resources with OneSearch, which is the tool that searches the entire Library collection. We have thousands and thousands of online resources that you may access 24/7.

Learn more about OneSearch >>

Tip 4: Our Events Calendar

Check our Events Calendar for the latest workshops you may attend, including Library Lunch and Learn sessions.

Tip 5: Our Library Guides

Library Guides are a great starting point for exploring the Library’s collection. Guides are a collection of resources and links on a specific topic, gathered together by a Library professional. A good place to begin is with our Library 101 section, which will help you get the most out of your Library experience. Otherwise, you may search the guides or browse by subject. Guides can draw you to new and unexpected resources, leading you to explore information in greater detail.

Tip 6: Our COVID-19 FAQ

Have questions about service changes during the pandemic? For example, wondering if physical books may still be borrowed? Indeed, they can! This is the kind of information you’ll find on the COVID-19 FAQ page.

We’re Here for You!

The Library and Academic Success Centre’s number one goal is to help you succeed at Red River College. Through chat and virtual meetings, we will meet you WHEREVER you are during these difficult times!

Hygge this winter with RRC Library

December 17, 2020

What is Hygge?

Hygge. Pronounced “Hue-gah.” (n.) Danish. A mood of coziness and comfort with feelings of wellness and contentment.

Hygge is also the topic of a new series coming to RRC Library’s social media channels. Each week, we will feature online resources to help you rest, relax, and refocus this winter season. This collection is entirely online, available 24/7, and the link to each resource is provided below.

Follow us!

To learn about other fun series as well as service and programming updates, follow us! Click on the icons below to visit our pages.

 

 

 

Hygge with RRC Library Collection

50 ways to soothe yourself without food

A collection of mindfulness skills and practices for relaxing the body in times of stress and ending your dependence on eating as a means of coping with difficult emotions.

In this book we will explain why downtime is inadequate for helping us recharge our batteries, and present you with an effective alternative.

Brilliant book of calm: down to earth ideas for finding inner peace in a chaotic world

The brilliant book of calm will help you find and maintain a balanced perspective on life, so that you can deal with anything.

Drawing calm: relax, refresh, refocus with 20 drawing, painting, and collage workshops inspired by Klimt, Klee, Monet, and more

Drawing Calm teaches artists and non-artists how to find an oasis of calm every day by using the work of master painters to inspire creativity.


Dream design live

With stunning photography and accessible-yet-elegant tips, Dream Design Live fuses interior decorating advice with lifestyle recommendations and demonstrates how living a happy and satisfying life starts at home.

Gifts of imperfection: let go of who you think you’re supposed to be and embrace who you are

An engaging exploration of how we can cultivate the courage, compassion, and connection to wake up in the morning and think, No matter what gets done and how much is left undone, I am enough, and to go to bed at night thinking, Yes, I am sometimes afraid, but I am also brave. And, yes, I am imperfect and vulnerable, but that doesn’t change the truth that I am worthy of love and belonging.

Happiness: the science behind your smile

This is the first book to comprehensively address the most basic of human desires. Everybody wants it. But what exactly is happiness?

Little ways to keep calm and carry on: twenty lessons for managing worry, anxiety, and fear

A psychologist, psychiatry professor, and anxiety researcher present twenty simple lessons that readers can use to relieve everyday anxiety on the spot and to develop resilience.


Make yourself cozy

Freshly baked bread. Cloud-like pillows. Lavender tea. Katie Vaz’s book on self-care shows readers how slow, cozy warmth can help them deal with the anxieties and challenges of everyday life.

Mindful learning: reduce stress and improve brain performance for effective learning

Practical insights and exercises on how to apply mindfulness in the educational setting, this book clearly sets out how we can manage stress, improve performance and create better communication and relationships.

Mindfulness for students

Through insightful ideas and personal anecdotes, this book will introduce you to the many benefits and applications of mindfulness – from mindful breathing, eating, exercising, sleeping, studying and communicating.

One pot comfort: make everyday meals in one pot, pan or appliance

An inspiring collection of everyday recipes for favorite comfort foods made in one pot, pan, or appliance.


Open house : reinventing space for simple living

A sweeping behind-the-scenes perspective on home transformations, written in a personal, intimate style, with humor and honesty.

Recover from burnout: life lessons to regain your passion and purpose

Discover how to understand your burnout, recognize and engage with the underlying fears and beliefs that underpin your drive to push your body, mind and spirit to breaking point, change the beliefs and habits that have exhausted you, regain your energy and enthusiasm, and avoid falling back into the burnout traps.

Relax and enjoy life: 149 ultimate stress busters

149 stress-proofing ideas which are short and practical but can help you live the life you want to live …now.

Yes lives in the land of no: a tale of triumph over negativity

A how-to manual that’s both practical and entertaining. It will help you find the YESes you seek–faster, more effectively, and with a lot less discouragement and despair in the process.


We’d love to hear from you!

Written by Linda Fox, Library Services

Moving online: Behind the scenes at RRC Library

December 11, 2020

Guest post: Written by James Spencer, RRC Library and Information Technology student

2020: A year of transition for students and faculty alike

This year has been truly the likes of which none of us have ever seen before. It has been quite an adjustment for both RRC students and staff alike transitioning to this world of social distancing and online learning. As a faculty that serves both RRC staff and students, the RRC Library had to adapt on the fly as well.

As a Library and Information Technology program student at the Exchange District Campus, I was fortunate enough to spend two weeks with the RRC Library staff at the Notre Dame Campus for my work experience practicum. The experience was truly eye-opening, it has given me a unique perspective on how the RRC Library has adapted during this time of the global pandemic. Although we may not be able to see it in person like in the past, there is a lot of hard work going on behind the scenes at the RRC Library to make this transition as smooth as possible for the entire RRC family.

Cloud-based Library system made for an easy pivot to online

The cloud-based system ALMA, used by the RRC Library staff, has allowed for a quick pivot back to a relatively normal online library experience for RRC students. If library records and accounts were housed internally on the RRC computer system as they were prior to ALMA, there would be a noticeable backlog resulting in poor service for RRC patrons. It is this interconnectivity provided by ALMA amongst the numerous RRC Library services that has helped to maintain regularity for RRC students and staff during these uncertain times.

Although most RRC students might be unfamiliar ALMA, whenever we use the OneSearch database on the RRC Library website, we are using Primo, the sister system to ALMA. It is ALMA that connects RRC OneSearch users to several databases such as EBSCOhost, Academic Search Complete, and CINAHL to name a few. These databases provide RRC students the essential journal articles that are needed for their studies.

Chat service allows staff to provide assistance to users while they’re at home

Another essential for RRC Library users is a live chat service. You may have noticed this little chatbot as you first enter the RRC Library website. I know what you’re thinking, is this a robot? Sorry to burst your bubble but it is a dedicated RRC Library staff member ready to help RRC students with their reference needs. Due to the restrictions of the pandemic, this service is more valuable than ever before. Thanks to this service, RRC students can stay safe at home and have their reference needs satisfied all the while.

Although we may remain socially distant for the time being, if we remain open to adapting and interacting with each other just like ALMA and the numerous RRC Library services it provides, we can all get through these times and be better as an RRC family when we do return to normalcy.

Visit the Library – Online!

To view the complete range of supports available from the Library and Academic Success Centre, visit our websites!

LIBRARYPerson working at a laptop with books at the side. text: RRC Library: Guiding You Through A World of Information.

ACADEMIC SUCCESS CENTREFemale students with a big smile. Text: Academic Success Centre


This academic year finds us in quite a different world; however, our commitment to providing you with the supports and services you need to succeed at RRC remains unchanged. As we continue this year together, the Academic Success Centre & Library are here for you.

Coming Soon! Live Sessions From Library Lunch and Learn

December 4, 2020

Library Lunch and Learn has evolved and expanded yet again. From its beginnings as a lunchtime session in the NDC Library classroom, it transitioned to pre-recorded mini-lectures on demand. We are pleased to announce that, beginning in January 2021, we will be adding live sessions to the mix. These webinars will provide an interactive learning environment with opportunities to ask questions and dig deeper into the learning process.

New Website Ties It All Together

Library Lunch and Learn has a new location on the web. Here you may:

  • View the upcoming schedule
  • Register for a webinar
  • Access related handouts and guides
  • Watch Lunch and Learn on demand

What is Library Lunch and Learn?

A series of mini-lectures demonstrating the ins and outs of Library tools, databases, and research methods in a short, upbeat lunchtime session.

Have a question?

During the Library’s regular hours, a friendly staff member is available to chat with you online. Just click on the Ask Us bubble at library.rrc.ca.


This academic year finds us however, our commitment to providing you with the supports and services you need to succeed at RRC remains unchanged. As we continue this year together, the Academic Success Centre & Library are here for you.

Identifying credible information

November 24, 2020

Written by Bren Johnstone, RRC Library & Information Technology student

Person reading news on an electronic device.

Photo by Kaboompics.com from Pexels

Don’t get sucked in by fake news

You probably already know not to trust everything you read on the internet – but how comfortable are you really when it comes to checking the facts? In a world of constant updates, influencers, and increasing global awareness, it can be hard to keep track of what’s real and what’s a sensationalized story for internet fame. Use these resources to help build up your information literacy skills so you can spot the difference and avoid the trap of fake news.

What is media literacy anyway?

If literacy is the ability to make meaning out of words, then media literacy is the ability to think critically about that meaning. What is the goal behind it – selling something, convincing you to do something? Who is telling us, and what makes them a credible source or not? When did this happen? All of these questions can have an impact on how we understand what we’re being told.

One way to remember this process is the CRAAP test, originally developed by the California State University:Diagram indicating the steps in the CRAAP test: Currency, Relevancy, Authority, Accuracy, Purpose

  • Currency – how recent is the information? How time-sensitive is it?
  • Relevance – is this information appropriate? Who is it meant for?
  • Authority – who is the source? What credentials do they have for this claim?
  • Accuracy – can this be verified by other sources? Is it everything, or just partial information?
  • Purpose – what’s the goal? Is this fact or opinion?

Resources

To get you thinking about media literacy, this article by Maribeth D. Smith, “Arming students against bad information,” outlines the CRAAP test in more detail as well as highlighting the dangers of buying into misinformation.

If you want to get right into the practical skills, here are two video tutorial series to get you started:

  • This video series by Crash Course and MediaWise is a good place to start identifying media literacy skills, like lateral-reading and evaluating evidence.
  • LinkedIn Learning has a whole course plan available on developing information literacy skills for academic research, including how to evaluate different types of sources and how to search effectively.

And if you learn best by example, the Infodemic blog is a great place to explore. The blog is run by Mike Caulfield who is a digital literacy expert and uses Covid-19 information as a guidebook to demonstrate essential fact-checking skills.

Looking for more resources?

Check out the library guide for more sources on how to evaluate websites and online resources here. Or contact the library staff by email at library@rrc.ca or by visiting library.rrc.ca and click on the Ask Us button. In addition, the Library’s broad selection of online books, videos, and journals may be accessed 24/7 through OneSearch​ (RRC log in may be required).


This academic year finds us in quite a different world; however, our commitment to providing you with the supports and services you need to succeed at RRC remains unchanged. As we continue this year together, the Academic Success Centre & Library are here for you.

Free Supports From Your Library and Academic Success Team!

October 22, 2020

A special message from Library Services

This new academic year finds us in quite a different world, however, our commitment to providing you with the supports and services needed to succeed at RRC remains unchanged; in fact, it has grown stronger. We have expanded our online services, and also provide some onsite supports as requested, which means we are able to meet you where and when you need us. As we continue this fall term together, we are here for you.

Online supports

Our virtual services and support are available to you for free five days a week during the following hours:

Monday – Thursday
7:45 am – 5:00 pm

Friday
7:45 am – 4:30 pm

See below for an overview of what we offer and how to access our services.

Academic Success Centre

Female students with a big smile. Text: Academic Success CentreThe Academic Success Centre offers an array of academic supports and services online, by e-mail or phone – visit their website and connect with them! They have a dedicated group of tutors and specialists ready to support you in your course work. To request tutoring, academic coaching, EAL supports, or academic writing support, students can complete the Tutoring and Coaching Request Form.

RRC Library

Person working at a laptop with books at the side. text: RRC Library: Guiding You Through A World of Information.The Library’s online services remain as robust as ever, with continual improvements in programming and content. In addition to guides and mini-lectures on demand, the Library’s online collection is available 24/7 through OneSearch. We help students with research and database navigation through various online options such as chat, email and Teams. To ask a question or connect with a Library staff member, visit library.rrc.ca and click on the Ask Us bubble.

Or connect with us in-person

On Mondays and Wednesdays, the NDC Library is open 7:45 am – 5:00 pm. Come by for a quiet place to focus on your work (free wi-fi included) and in-person assistance from a Library staff member.

Onsite tutoring and EAL supports are available by appointment at NDC on Mondays and Wednesdays (daytime) and at EDC on Fridays (daytime). To book an appointment, students can complete the Tutoring and Coaching Request Form.