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RefWorks: For Anyone Who Needs to Write and Cite

February 19, 2020

RefWorks Could Be Your New Best Friend

RefWorks logoWe all know that writing a paper has its headaches, especially the task of tracking and citing sources. RefWorks, now offered by RRC Library, is a reference management service that streamlines the research and citation process for you. It will store your sources and generate authoritative citations and bibliographies in whatever format you need so you can focus writing your paper. RefWorks also coordinates with Word and Google Docs, allowing you to quickly insert and edit citations and add them to your bibliography as you go.

If you are in the process of conducting research, compiling sources and creating citations, RefWorks will be a lifesaver.

RefWorks: For anyone who needs to write and cite

 

LEARN MORE…

  • Visit the RefWorks guide for more information.
  • Attend the RefWorks Lunch and Learn session at NDC Library on Thursday, February 27, 12:15-12:45.
  • Contact us or visit one of our service desks for one-on-one assistance.

Long Night Against Procrastination 2020 – Highlights

February 7, 2020

The Long Night Against Procrastination (LNAP), an evening where students were invited to study and get help with their assignments, was held in the Library on February 6, 2020. To all who attended, the evening was deemed a success!

Eighty-five students registered for the event and over one hundred attended. There were many areas students participated in, such as help desks, academic coaching, and art therapy. Free pizza was offered to satisfy hungry appetites.

The Library looks forward to hosting this event again.

Missed LNAP, and still need learning support?

The services and supports such as those offered at LNAP are offered by the Library and Academic Success Centre on a daily basis. To learn more about these supports, click on the links below or contact us.

Learn more >>

Academic Success Centre

Library

Contact Us >>

Contact the Library for research and technical assistance

Contact the Academic Success Centre staff for help desks, tutoring, study groups, review workshops, and EAL supports

Photo Highlights

LNAP Window Display

LNAP Window Display

Adrian Johnson at the LNAP Technical Assistance Help Desk

LNAP Technical Assistance Help Desk

Biological Science Help Desk

 

Library Research Help Desk

Art Therapy

Study Area

Group Study Area

Free Pizza

Free Pizza at the LNAP

 

Sick of Fake News? Media Literacy Week has the Cure for You!

October 2, 2019

In an age of information overload, it’s easy to consume as much as we can without considering where it came from or what the consequences might be. It can take long enough just to read a piece of information, let alone to verify it and decide whether or not it holds any water.

MediaSmarts' Break the Fake logo

MediaSmarts’ Break the Fake logo

This year’s Media Literacy Week theme is Break the Fake, and the Library wants to help you make breaking the fake news cycle a little less daunting and a little more empowering. Here are 4 tips to help you break the fake!

Tip #1: Use fact-checking tools

Perhaps the most obvious way to make sure what you’re reading is true is to confirm the facts being presented. There are many fact-checking websites that do this regularly so a quick pit-stop after reading a news story is sometimes all it takes to debunk fake news. Here’s a list of useful fact-checking websites:

You can also do a general Google search of the story with the word “hoax” after it to see if any other sources might have questioned a news item’s credibility.

Keep in mind that if a fact-checker hasn’t debunked something, it doesn’t automatically make the story true. It just means that the story hasn’t been fact-checked yet. Not every story gets verified by fact-checkers so while it’s important to be aware of these websites, it’s important to be aware of their limitations as well.

Want more quality fact-checkers? Click here for an extensive list of fact-checkers from all over the world that have committed to the International Fact-Checking Network’s code of principles.

Tip #2: Find the source

It’s important to understand where something originally came from before you decide to trust it. A news story shared on social media almost certainly wasn’t published there, or it might be based entirely on someone else’s story. Fortunately, it often only takes a few clicks to find your way to the original source.

On social media, the link is usually found at the bottom of the post. On a website, look for key phrases like “according to” or “reported by” that indicate where the information came from.

For images, use a reverse image search tool like TinEye or Google Images. Upload the image or paste the image’s URL into the search bar to get a list of results where that image has been found.

TinEye screen capture

To get the image URL, right-click the online image and select “Copy image address.” Alternatively, right-click the image and select “Properties,” then copy the URL provided. Filter the results from oldest to newest to see when and where the image was first published.

*If you’re using Google Chrome you can search the image by right-clicking the image and selecting “Search Google for image.”

Follow the trail until you’ve found the original source!

Tip #3: Verify the source

When it comes to breaking fake news, we have to determine whether or not the original creator is trustworthy. Even if that information was shared with us by trustworthy family or friends, we shouldn’t assume that they checked the facts themselves. Instead, we should verify the original source ourselves first, then decide whether or not it’s reliable.

Here’s 3 questions to determine if a source is reliable:

  1. Do they really exist?

It’s become easy to create fake websites that look far more credible and professional than the actual content that they produce. Don’t assume their “About Us” page is necessarily true either.  Use a far-reaching website like Wikipedia or Google to see if others have found them to actually exist. Don’t forget to make sure that these “others” actually exist themselves.

  1. Are they who they say they are?

Just as it’s easy to create fake websites and content, it’s easy to pose as someone who actually does exist online. If you know the source exists, be sure the information is coming from them and not an impostor.

Look for indicators that verify who they are. Twitter and Instagram verify users by putting a blue check mark next to their name on their profile.

  1. Are they trustworthy?

Make sure the source has a reliable process for producing information and a good track record for providing it accurately. Do they make mistakes? More importantly, do they admit to them and correct them when they do? Are they experts on that topic? Are they willing to publish information that their owners or readers would disagree with? Answering these types of questions can help you determine where the source’s interests lie and whether or not they should be trusted.

Tip #4: Check other sources

To make sure you’re getting the whole story, check other news sources to see how they covered the event or topic. This is a great way to see if what you read omitted any important information. It’s also an effective way of highlighting any possible bias that a source might have.

Using the “News” tab when doing a Google search is an easy way to narrow down results to real news outlets when looking for other sources.

Google News tab screen capture*Find it faster! Use Control-F (Command-F on Macs) to jump to a keyword or phrase in an article.

You can also try to find the consensus view on the topic (what most experts agree to be true). If the story is only sharing information that experts agree to be false, you’re likely reading misinformation.

MediaSmarts has created a custom search to help you find the consensus view on specialist topics like science and medicine. You can try it out here!

Now that you’re equipped with these tips and tools, go ahead and put them–and the news you come across–to the test. While you might not be able to stop fake news from being published, you can stop it from spreading.

Want to learn more? Check out MediaSmarts, a not-for-profit that develops digital and media literacy programs for Canadians, or go to the “How to Evaluate Websites and Online Resources” guide to explore some of the Library’s resources on the topic.

More of a hands on learner? Play the Reality Check game to test your skills and learn some new authentication techniques.

 

Increasing Accessibility to Educational Videos: A Joint Project between AV Services and Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services

September 19, 2019

laptop with closed captioned symbol on screen

Background

In March, 2019, AV Services and Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services received a $25,000 grant from The Winnipeg Foundation to support a project that will increase accessibility to instructional video at Red River College. Through the joint effort of these two departments, in partnership with the Manitoba Association of Visual Language Interpreters (M.A.V.L.I.), this project aims to provide closed captioning to 20,000 minutes of video from Red River College Library’s streaming collection.

Why Closed Captions are Essential

As many know, video resources are a staple component in most course curriculum at the College. The use of captioned streaming video as an instructional tool supports universal course design and provides educational equity for people who have a hearing disability. For this reason, providing captions to streaming video has been targeted as an essential step in satisfying the Information and Communications Accessibility Standard as laid out in the Accessibility for Manitobans Act and the College’s Accessibility Plan.

Added Benefits for All

While the project’s primary aim is to make educational video accessible to the Deaf or Hard of Hearing, as well as those with disabilities, there are added benefits for those without a disability. Some of the secondary benefits of this project include:

  • CPC CaptionMaker software package, if purchased, would enable quick one-off captioning of videos and would allow the Library and other Departments to add closed captions to videos as well (pending vendor/author approval).
  • Computerized note takers, who provide a valuable service to the College through the school year, would receive compensation for their skills during summer months when they normally face a reduction in hours.
  • Videos that are captioned would maximize learning for all by enhancing different learning styles, allowing videos to be watched in noisy or quiet environments, and aiding comprehension for ESL learners.
  • Closed captions make some videos searchable, meaning that the viewer can search for and locate a word or phrase within the video efficiently.

Support Required to Keep it Going

While the grant money has been well-utilized and the project has been a success, it is only a start. As new students arrive, courses evolve, and the Library’s collection expands, the demand to produce captioned videos will not go away. Financial support to cover the staffing, software, and miscellaneous fees will be required, and the results produced by our departments are an encouraging step toward justifying that support.

Note of Appreciation to Supporters and Staff

The Winnipeg Foundation logoWe would like to thank The Winnipeg Foundation and M.A.V.L.I. for their support in getting this project off the ground. We also extend our appreciation to the staff in Library Services and Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services who led the project as well as those behind the scenes who dedicated their time and energy to produce the final product.

Suggest a Video for Captioning

For more information on this project, or to suggest a video for captioning, please contact:

  • Charlene Tweed, Supervisor, Library Resource Management
    ctweed@rrc.ca | 204-632-2389
  • Jill Patterson, Manager, Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services
    jpatterson@rrc.ca | 204-632-3092

Library Services: Hub for Success

August 26, 2019

A Warm Welcome

RRC Library Services is evolving. In the past year we have seen some exciting improvements in our department. Read on to explore the variety of spaces and services available at the Library. As we embark on a new school year, we would like to extend a warm welcome to the students and staff we serve at Red River College.

Library Services

Library Services has expanded!  Academic Success Centre (ASC) and Library Services are now operating out of our Notre Dame Campus and Exchange District Campus Library spaces. We are the hub for supports and resources for both staff and students at the College.

Academic Success Centre

Visit the ASC website for more information about the free services they offer and how to access them.

Library

Library staff are information professionals, trained to help you find and assess information. While the general public is familiar with using Wikipedia and Google, our Library staff are experienced with an array of sources and skills that you may be unaware of. While we offer assistance in navigating information sources, we also want you to know you can ask us anything! We are here to support you!

The following is a list of common Library services:
  • Reference consultations: one-on-one assistance locating information
  • Audio visual services: AV equipment loans and video
  • Library orientations: class orientations (instructors may contact us to arrange this)
  • Collection development: resources to support learning and instruction at the College (instructors may recommend a purchase)
  • Guides: online guides on multiple subjects to assist research and academic success
  • Technical support: troubleshooting and technical assistance (in person at the Help Desk and online)
  • Chat Service: online chat service (visit the Library website to try it out!)
  • Borrowing Services: free access to books, e-books, journals, e-journals, databases, DVDs, streaming video, and audiovisual equipment. Keep in mind that what you see on the shelf is just the tip of the iceberg. Many of our digital resources may be accessed on any computer or mobile device. We encourage you to explore the Library collection with our NEW OneSearch.

Library Spaces: Notre Dame Campus

Improvements are happening to the Library spaces. See below for a brief tour of the variety of spaces available to you at NDC Library.

Quiet and Group Study Areas

The Quiet Study Area is for focused, silent individual work. The Group Study Area is for open conversation and group work.

Tutor Rooms and Portable White Boards (NEW additions to the Group Study Area)

The tutor rooms – with glass fronts on them – are set aside for tutors to work with students. One room only is for available for students to book using the posted sign-up sheet (max 2 hrs/day). The new sliding white boards are located in the Group Study Area.

Reading areas with comfy chairs, side tables and more

There are multiple reading areas where students can sit comfortably and relax (or work on a puzzle). Also look out for our New Books display, which features all of our new arrivals.

Book Stacks (located in the Quiet Study Area)

Our books and back issues of journals are located on the Quiet side of the Library.

Computer Lab

The Computer Lab (and adjoining Classroom) have computers, printers, a copier and a scanning station. Technical assistance is also available at our Help Desk. Orientations and sessions such as our upcoming Lunch and Learn are held in the Classroom.

RRC Library: A Safe Place to Be

Library Services offers a safe, non-judgmental environment where all questions are good ones! We invite you to make use of the Library spaces and services, and explore our website to see what interests you. Best wishes in your studies, teaching and service at the College.

— posted by Linda Fox, RRC Library

Academic Success Centre: Moving, Evolving, Expanding!

July 24, 2019

This past year was an exciting one for the Academic Success Centre! You may have noticed a few changes, including our physical move to Library Services. The relocation of tutoring, academic coaching and EAL supports under the umbrella of the Library has served to increase access and create a hive of academic support and resource services at the heart of NDC and EDC.

The move this past year was incremental, with the introduction of writing, stats and math help desks in the Library lobby, and with the gradual build of small and large group tutoring spaces at both campuses. The 2019/2020 academic year will be one of full integration, with all ASC activity located in or near each campus library.

In addition to creating a one-stop-access point for students, ASC and Library staff have begun to collaborate on new projects and services, increasing the power and scope of RRC academic, resource and research supports and services.

And now we are also part of the Library website! We have re-organized the information about our ASC services and learning resources to make the navigation of the content more efficient, while also making seamless connections with Library resources. Check out our new web presence at https://rrclibrary.libguides.com/asc.

Wishing you a nice summer time and a great beginning of classes in the Fall!

AV Services has a new look on the Web

February 26, 2019

AV Services new web content

AV Services’ new Web content

There is more to AV Services than meets the eye. In our newly enhanced Web content, we would like to provide a central place where users can look up information about our services and resources. You will also find handy online forms that you may use to communicate with us. Of course, you may also stop by in person, call us, or email us at your convenience.

Hope to hear from you soon,

RRC Library – AV Services

Connecting to “RRCWireless”

August 21, 2018

Wireless at RRCThe first thing new students want to do when on campus is connect to wireless! The Red River College Library continues to receive inquiries about the college wireless network. We attempt to answer our patron’s questions, though we do not control or manage the wireless networks at RRC. At the Library we are wireless users, just like you!

On our campuses, the Information Technology Solutions department manages the wireless networks, and publish wireless help guides in their help pages.

Important Wireless Tips!

Tip #1: Always use RRCWireless. Don’t use RRCGuest!

Staff and students should connect through the Wireless Network named RRCWireless. Do not connect to RRCGUEST.

The network you need to connect to is named RRCWireless.

A common problem that occurs is users try to connect to the network named “RRCGuest”.  This network is for guests to the college and is not meant to be used by students and/or staff.

Connections to “RRCGuest” require a special username and a password that must be obtained  in advance, by making a CASELOG request to Information Technology Solutions.  The Library does not know any of the usernames and/or passwords and we cannot issue you with one.

Tip #2: Make sure you use your correct username and password

The RRCWireless network does not operate like an open wireless, such as the wireless at “Starbucks” or “McDonald’s”. A user needs to enter their username and password to obtain a connection. When challenged, use your normal RRC network username and password to login.

After you enter your username and password, you may be asked whether you “trust” the network you must say “yes” and “accept” the connection to the network.

Tip #3: Are you a Returning Student? Forget this Network!

forget

If you are a returning student, you were likely required to reset your password over the summer. When you return to the college, you have to make sure that any of your devices, such as cell phones or tablets, also have your new password in their settings.

Q: How do you do update your wireless password?
A: Forget this network!

Just ask your device to “Forget this Network” and then setup the network fresh. However, see the next Tip. It may affect you!

Tip #4: Lockouts (30 minutes)

If your device was set with an old password, keep in mind that it was actively connect to the wireless with an incorrect password. This would have caused the college’s wireless system to lock out your device. Unfortunately, when you attempt to reconnect with your username and a correct password you may still be locked out!

Wait 30 minutes after you “Forget this Network” for your locked-out device to be re-allowed to connect to RRCWireless.

Tip #5: Getting Support

Staff who have College-issued laptops and devices, should submit a Caselog (IT support request) if they have troubles connecting to the Wireless network

The RRC IT Department will not normally support students and staff who have personal devices. For personal devices, you need to refer to ITS Help Resources (online guides) and DYI (do it yourself).

If you have a personal device and you can’t seem to get it connected to the RRCWireless, you are welcome to visit one of the Library Helpdesks for face-to-face support:

  • Roblin Centre Lower Learning Commons:  Weekdays 8:00AM to 4:00 PM
  • Notre Dame Campus Library Computer Lab:  Weekdays 8:00AM to 4:00 PM

Library Helpdesk staff are great at helping students diagnose wireless issues!

Remember, the Library is always ready to guide you!

Come to the Library if you need face-to-face help from a real person!

RRC Library: Much More Than Books

August 28, 2017

Red River College Library extends a warm welcome to all new and returning staff and students. We are here to support you as you learn, teach, study and move forward in your careers.

Your RRC Library offers so much more than books! Take a few minutes to get familiar with the spaces and services we provide you.

The Library Spaces

The Libraries at the Exchange District Campus (EDC) and Notre Dame Campus (NDC) provide you with reading areas, study spaces (individual and small group), media viewing areas, computers, printers, copiers, and a scanning station.

Red River College Libraries

Loads of Resources

All students and staff have access to the Library’s books, e-books, journals, e-journals, databases, DVDs, streaming video, and audiovisual equipment. What you see when you walk in is just the tip of the iceberg, and many of our digital resources may be accessed in the comfort of your home and on your mobile device.

>> Learn about our new OneSearch discovery system

>> Browse our Subject Guides

Services to Support You

The staff at the Library will help you:

  • Locate information for assignments, research, instruction, personal use
  • Use all types of Library resources and search tools
  • Work with computers and applications such as Microsoft Office
  • Troubleshoot technical issues, including wireless and account log in
  • Find your way around the College and locate people who can help you

>> Learn more about RRC Library Services

Most importantly, we want you to know that you can ask us anything! We are here to support you!