Skip to Content

Library Services

Sick of Fake News? Media Literacy Week has the Cure for You!

October 2, 2019

In an age of information overload, it’s easy to consume as much as we can without considering where it came from or what the consequences might be. It can take long enough just to read a piece of information, let alone to verify it and decide whether or not it holds any water.

MediaSmarts' Break the Fake logo

MediaSmarts’ Break the Fake logo

This year’s Media Literacy Week theme is Break the Fake, and the Library wants to help you make breaking the fake news cycle a little less daunting and a little more empowering. Here are 4 tips to help you break the fake!

Tip #1: Use fact-checking tools

Perhaps the most obvious way to make sure what you’re reading is true is to confirm the facts being presented. There are many fact-checking websites that do this regularly so a quick pit-stop after reading a news story is sometimes all it takes to debunk fake news. Here’s a list of useful fact-checking websites:

You can also do a general Google search of the story with the word “hoax” after it to see if any other sources might have questioned a news item’s credibility.

Keep in mind that if a fact-checker hasn’t debunked something, it doesn’t automatically make the story true. It just means that the story hasn’t been fact-checked yet. Not every story gets verified by fact-checkers so while it’s important to be aware of these websites, it’s important to be aware of their limitations as well.

Want more quality fact-checkers? Click here for an extensive list of fact-checkers from all over the world that have committed to the International Fact-Checking Network’s code of principles.

Tip #2: Find the source

It’s important to understand where something originally came from before you decide to trust it. A news story shared on social media almost certainly wasn’t published there, or it might be based entirely on someone else’s story. Fortunately, it often only takes a few clicks to find your way to the original source.

On social media, the link is usually found at the bottom of the post. On a website, look for key phrases like “according to” or “reported by” that indicate where the information came from.

For images, use a reverse image search tool like TinEye or Google Images. Upload the image or paste the image’s URL into the search bar to get a list of results where that image has been found.

TinEye screen capture

To get the image URL, right-click the online image and select “Copy image address.” Alternatively, right-click the image and select “Properties,” then copy the URL provided. Filter the results from oldest to newest to see when and where the image was first published.

*If you’re using Google Chrome you can search the image by right-clicking the image and selecting “Search Google for image.”

Follow the trail until you’ve found the original source!

Tip #3: Verify the source

When it comes to breaking fake news, we have to determine whether or not the original creator is trustworthy. Even if that information was shared with us by trustworthy family or friends, we shouldn’t assume that they checked the facts themselves. Instead, we should verify the original source ourselves first, then decide whether or not it’s reliable.

Here’s 3 questions to determine if a source is reliable:

  1. Do they really exist?

It’s become easy to create fake websites that look far more credible and professional than the actual content that they produce. Don’t assume their “About Us” page is necessarily true either.  Use a far-reaching website like Wikipedia or Google to see if others have found them to actually exist. Don’t forget to make sure that these “others” actually exist themselves.

  1. Are they who they say they are?

Just as it’s easy to create fake websites and content, it’s easy to pose as someone who actually does exist online. If you know the source exists, be sure the information is coming from them and not an impostor.

Look for indicators that verify who they are. Twitter and Instagram verify users by putting a blue check mark next to their name on their profile.

  1. Are they trustworthy?

Make sure the source has a reliable process for producing information and a good track record for providing it accurately. Do they make mistakes? More importantly, do they admit to them and correct them when they do? Are they experts on that topic? Are they willing to publish information that their owners or readers would disagree with? Answering these types of questions can help you determine where the source’s interests lie and whether or not they should be trusted.

Tip #4: Check other sources

To make sure you’re getting the whole story, check other news sources to see how they covered the event or topic. This is a great way to see if what you read omitted any important information. It’s also an effective way of highlighting any possible bias that a source might have.

Using the “News” tab when doing a Google search is an easy way to narrow down results to real news outlets when looking for other sources.

Google News tab screen capture*Find it faster! Use Control-F (Command-F on Macs) to jump to a keyword or phrase in an article.

You can also try to find the consensus view on the topic (what most experts agree to be true). If the story is only sharing information that experts agree to be false, you’re likely reading misinformation.

MediaSmarts has created a custom search to help you find the consensus view on specialist topics like science and medicine. You can try it out here!

Now that you’re equipped with these tips and tools, go ahead and put them–and the news you come across–to the test. While you might not be able to stop fake news from being published, you can stop it from spreading.

Want to learn more? Check out MediaSmarts, a not-for-profit that develops digital and media literacy programs for Canadians, or go to the “How to Evaluate Websites and Online Resources” guide to explore some of the Library’s resources on the topic.

More of a hands on learner? Play the Reality Check game to test your skills and learn some new authentication techniques.

 

Increasing Accessibility to Educational Videos: A Joint Project between AV Services and Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services

September 19, 2019

laptop with closed captioned symbol on screen

Background

In March, 2019, AV Services and Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services received a $25,000 grant from The Winnipeg Foundation to support a project that will increase accessibility to instructional video at Red River College. Through the joint effort of these two departments, in partnership with the Manitoba Association of Visual Language Interpreters (M.A.V.L.I.), this project aims to provide closed captioning to 20,000 minutes of video from Red River College Library’s streaming collection.

Why Closed Captions are Essential

As many know, video resources are a staple component in most course curriculum at the College. The use of captioned streaming video as an instructional tool supports universal course design and provides educational equity for people who have a hearing disability. For this reason, providing captions to streaming video has been targeted as an essential step in satisfying the Information and Communications Accessibility Standard as laid out in the Accessibility for Manitobans Act and the College’s Accessibility Plan.

Added Benefits for All

While the project’s primary aim is to make educational video accessible to the Deaf or Hard of Hearing, as well as those with disabilities, there are added benefits for those without a disability. Some of the secondary benefits of this project include:

  • CPC CaptionMaker software package, if purchased, would enable quick one-off captioning of videos and would allow the Library and other Departments to add closed captions to videos as well (pending vendor/author approval).
  • Computerized note takers, who provide a valuable service to the College through the school year, would receive compensation for their skills during summer months when they normally face a reduction in hours.
  • Videos that are captioned would maximize learning for all by enhancing different learning styles, allowing videos to be watched in noisy or quiet environments, and aiding comprehension for ESL learners.
  • Closed captions make some videos searchable, meaning that the viewer can search for and locate a word or phrase within the video efficiently.

Support Required to Keep it Going

While the grant money has been well-utilized and the project has been a success, it is only a start. As new students arrive, courses evolve, and the Library’s collection expands, the demand to produce captioned videos will not go away. Financial support to cover the staffing, software, and miscellaneous fees will be required, and the results produced by our departments are an encouraging step toward justifying that support.

Note of Appreciation to Supporters and Staff

The Winnipeg Foundation logoWe would like to thank The Winnipeg Foundation and M.A.V.L.I. for their support in getting this project off the ground. We also extend our appreciation to the staff in Library Services and Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services who led the project as well as those behind the scenes who dedicated their time and energy to produce the final product.

Suggest a Video for Captioning

For more information on this project, or to suggest a video for captioning, please contact:

  • Charlene Tweed, Supervisor, Library Resource Management
    ctweed@rrc.ca | 204-632-2389
  • Jill Patterson, Manager, Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services
    jpatterson@rrc.ca | 204-632-3092

Lunch & Learn at the Notre Dame Campus Library

September 17, 2019

Bring your lunch and learn a new skill

The Notre Dame Campus Library will be presenting a series of drop-in mini-lectures in our classroom this year. Each session will feature one topic to help you find and access quality information efficiently. Topics include:

  • OneSearch (new and enhanced!)
  • Specialty databases such as eCPS, CINAHL, Knovel, Nursing Reference Centre, and UpToDate
  • Research topics such as identifying Peer-Reviewed Journals and preventing information overload by using Google, Wikipedia and the Web effectively

Location: Notre Dame Campus Library Classroom

Date: every second Thursday starting in October

Time: 12:15-12:45pm

2019/2020 Series Schedule

Date Time Topic Facilitator
Oct 3 12:15-12:45pm OneSearch (new and improved) Rosemary
Oct 17

POSTPONED

12:15-12:45pm How Not to Drown In Information Fatima
Oct 31 12:15-12:45pm UpToDate (database) John Mark
Nov 14
date change
12:15-12:45pm eCPS (database) Rosemary
Dec 5
date change
12:15-12:45pm CINAHL Plus Joan
Dec 12
date change
12:15-12:45pm Peer-Reviewed Journals 101 Rosemary
Jan 16 12:15-12:45pm OneSearch (new and improved) Rosemary
Jan 30 12:15-12:45pm Knovel (database) TBD
Feb 13 12:15-12:45pm How Not to Drown In Information Fatima
Feb 27 12:15-12:45pm Nursing Reference Centre (database) Joan
Mar 12 12:15-12:45pm Research – Getting started Rosemary
Mar 26 12:15-12:45pm TBA TBD
Apr 9 12:15-12:45pm TBA TBD

The schedule is subject to change – always check the Events Calendar at Library.rrc.ca for current sessions.

Series Descriptions

OneSearch (new and improved)

The library has upgraded its Online Catalogue! The new and improved, OneSearch will search print books, ebooks and a variety of databases simultaneously. Come spend 30 min in the library and learn how to use this powerful tool.

How Not to Drown In Information

Forget information overload, we often feel like drowning in information with nobody throwing us a lifeline to shore. From CRAAP to RADAR, pick up some quick tips to evaluate information while researching for an assignment and learn how Google/Wikipedia can work with library resources not against.

  • Handouts (links will be added after the presentation)

UpToDate

UpToDate is point-of-care medical and drug database that contains clinical information intended to assist medical professionals in treating their patients.  It is available to students and staff at Red River College from the Library’s website and can be accessed via an app from anywhere and at any time on your own mobile device. The database is intended for use in clinical settings specifically to improve patient treatment by delivering current information at the point of need, supporting timely decision making and ensuring consistent care. Learn more about what this database has to offer and how to access and use it.

Peer-Reviewed Journals 101

For many disciplines, peer-reviewed research is required. Not sure if your perfect article is Peer-Reviewed? Check out this session to learn: what is a peer-reviewed (or scholarly) article or journal, how to identify a peer-reviewed article and where to find peer-reviewed articles.

  • Handouts (links will be added after the presentation)

CINAHL Plus

CINAHL Plus with Full Text is the core research tool for all areas of nursing and allied health literature with full-text coverage of 770 health journals.  Attend this session if you would like to build better searches, know more about MeSH Subject headings, or just be more successful in your searches.

  • Handouts (links will be added after the presentation)

eCPS – the Online Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties (CPS)

Looking for drug monographs? Need information on medications before you go on your clinical? This lecture will talk about the online CPS and all the features available through this powerful database including monographs, glossaries, calculators and CPS notifications and advisories.

  • Handouts (links will be added after the presentation)

More Information

Visit library.rrc.ca for more information about specific dates and topics. Stay tuned to your student and staff news for updates in your inbox.

If you have suggestions for topics that you would like to see presented in the 2020 series please contact Rosemary Woodby at rwoodby@rrc.ca.

Library Services: Hub for Success

August 26, 2019

A Warm Welcome

RRC Library Services is evolving. In the past year we have seen some exciting improvements in our department. Read on to explore the variety of spaces and services available at the Library. As we embark on a new school year, we would like to extend a warm welcome to the students and staff we serve at Red River College.

Library Services

Library Services has expanded!  Academic Success Centre (ASC) and Library Services are now operating out of our Notre Dame Campus and Exchange District Campus Library spaces. We are the hub for supports and resources for both staff and students at the College.

Academic Success Centre

Visit the ASC website for more information about the free services they offer and how to access them.

Library

Library staff are information professionals, trained to help you find and assess information. While the general public is familiar with using Wikipedia and Google, our Library staff are experienced with an array of sources and skills that you may be unaware of. While we offer assistance in navigating information sources, we also want you to know you can ask us anything! We are here to support you!

The following is a list of common Library services:
  • Reference consultations: one-on-one assistance locating information
  • Audio visual services: AV equipment loans and video
  • Library orientations: class orientations (instructors may contact us to arrange this)
  • Collection development: resources to support learning and instruction at the College (instructors may recommend a purchase)
  • Guides: online guides on multiple subjects to assist research and academic success
  • Technical support: troubleshooting and technical assistance (in person at the Help Desk and online)
  • Chat Service: online chat service (visit the Library website to try it out!)
  • Borrowing Services: free access to books, e-books, journals, e-journals, databases, DVDs, streaming video, and audiovisual equipment. Keep in mind that what you see on the shelf is just the tip of the iceberg. Many of our digital resources may be accessed on any computer or mobile device. We encourage you to explore the Library collection with our NEW OneSearch.

Library Spaces: Notre Dame Campus

Improvements are happening to the Library spaces. See below for a brief tour of the variety of spaces available to you at NDC Library.

Quiet and Group Study Areas

The Quiet Study Area is for focused, silent individual work. The Group Study Area is for open conversation and group work.

Tutor Rooms and Portable White Boards (NEW additions to the Group Study Area)

The tutor rooms – with glass fronts on them – are set aside for tutors to work with students. One room only is for available for students to book using the posted sign-up sheet (max 2 hrs/day). The new sliding white boards are located in the Group Study Area.

Reading areas with comfy chairs, side tables and more

There are multiple reading areas where students can sit comfortably and relax (or work on a puzzle). Also look out for our New Books display, which features all of our new arrivals.

Book Stacks (located in the Quiet Study Area)

Our books and back issues of journals are located on the Quiet side of the Library.

Computer Lab

The Computer Lab (and adjoining Classroom) have computers, printers, a copier and a scanning station. Technical assistance is also available at our Help Desk. Orientations and sessions such as our upcoming Lunch and Learn are held in the Classroom.

RRC Library: A Safe Place to Be

Library Services offers a safe, non-judgmental environment where all questions are good ones! We invite you to make use of the Library spaces and services, and explore our website to see what interests you. Best wishes in your studies, teaching and service at the College.

— posted by Linda Fox, RRC Library

Academic Success Centre: Moving, Evolving, Expanding!

July 24, 2019

This past year was an exciting one for the Academic Success Centre! You may have noticed a few changes, including our physical move to Library Services. The relocation of tutoring, academic coaching and EAL supports under the umbrella of the Library has served to increase access and create a hive of academic support and resource services at the heart of NDC and EDC.

The move this past year was incremental, with the introduction of writing, stats and math help desks in the Library lobby, and with the gradual build of small and large group tutoring spaces at both campuses. The 2019/2020 academic year will be one of full integration, with all ASC activity located in or near each campus library.

In addition to creating a one-stop-access point for students, ASC and Library staff have begun to collaborate on new projects and services, increasing the power and scope of RRC academic, resource and research supports and services.

And now we are also part of the Library website! We have re-organized the information about our ASC services and learning resources to make the navigation of the content more efficient, while also making seamless connections with Library resources. Check out our new web presence at https://rrclibrary.libguides.com/asc.

Wishing you a nice summer time and a great beginning of classes in the Fall!

AV Services has a new look on the Web

February 26, 2019

AV Services new web content

AV Services’ new Web content

There is more to AV Services than meets the eye. In our newly enhanced Web content, we would like to provide a central place where users can look up information about our services and resources. You will also find handy online forms that you may use to communicate with us. Of course, you may also stop by in person, call us, or email us at your convenience.

Hope to hear from you soon,

RRC Library – AV Services

Connecting to “RRCWireless”

August 21, 2018

Wireless at RRCThe first thing new students want to do when on campus is connect to wireless! The Red River College Library continues to receive inquiries about the college wireless network. We attempt to answer our patron’s questions, though we do not control or manage the wireless networks at RRC. At the Library we are wireless users, just like you!

On our campuses, the Information Technology Solutions department manages the wireless networks, and publish wireless help guides in their help pages.

Important Wireless Tips!

Tip #1: Always use RRCWireless. Don’t use RRCGuest!

Staff and students should connect through the Wireless Network named RRCWireless. Do not connect to RRCGUEST.

The network you need to connect to is named RRCWireless.

A common problem that occurs is users try to connect to the network named “RRCGuest”.  This network is for guests to the college and is not meant to be used by students and/or staff.

Connections to “RRCGuest” require a special username and a password that must be obtained  in advance, by making a CASELOG request to Information Technology Solutions.  The Library does not know any of the usernames and/or passwords and we cannot issue you with one.

Tip #2: Make sure you use your correct username and password

The RRCWireless network does not operate like an open wireless, such as the wireless at “Starbucks” or “McDonald’s”. A user needs to enter their username and password to obtain a connection. When challenged, use your normal RRC network username and password to login.

After you enter your username and password, you may be asked whether you “trust” the network you must say “yes” and “accept” the connection to the network.

Tip #3: Are you a Returning Student? Forget this Network!

forget

If you are a returning student, you were likely required to reset your password over the summer. When you return to the college, you have to make sure that any of your devices, such as cell phones or tablets, also have your new password in their settings.

Q: How do you do update your wireless password?
A: Forget this network!

Just ask your device to “Forget this Network” and then setup the network fresh. However, see the next Tip. It may affect you!

Tip #4: Lockouts (30 minutes)

If your device was set with an old password, keep in mind that it was actively connect to the wireless with an incorrect password. This would have caused the college’s wireless system to lock out your device. Unfortunately, when you attempt to reconnect with your username and a correct password you may still be locked out!

Wait 30 minutes after you “Forget this Network” for your locked-out device to be re-allowed to connect to RRCWireless.

Tip #5: Getting Support

Staff who have College-issued laptops and devices, should submit a Caselog (IT support request) if they have troubles connecting to the Wireless network

The RRC IT Department will not normally support students and staff who have personal devices. For personal devices, you need to refer to ITS Help Resources (online guides) and DYI (do it yourself).

If you have a personal device and you can’t seem to get it connected to the RRCWireless, you are welcome to visit one of the Library Helpdesks for face-to-face support:

  • Roblin Centre Lower Learning Commons:  Weekdays 8:00AM to 4:00 PM
  • Notre Dame Campus Library Computer Lab:  Weekdays 8:00AM to 4:00 PM

Library Helpdesk staff are great at helping students diagnose wireless issues!

Remember, the Library is always ready to guide you!

Come to the Library if you need face-to-face help from a real person!

RRC Library: Much More Than Books

August 28, 2017

Red River College Library extends a warm welcome to all new and returning staff and students. We are here to support you as you learn, teach, study and move forward in your careers.

Your RRC Library offers so much more than books! Take a few minutes to get familiar with the spaces and services we provide you.

The Library Spaces

The Libraries at the Exchange District Campus (EDC) and Notre Dame Campus (NDC) provide you with reading areas, study spaces (individual and small group), media viewing areas, computers, printers, copiers, and a scanning station.

Red River College Libraries

Loads of Resources

All students and staff have access to the Library’s books, e-books, journals, e-journals, databases, DVDs, streaming video, and audiovisual equipment. What you see when you walk in is just the tip of the iceberg, and many of our digital resources may be accessed in the comfort of your home and on your mobile device.

>> Learn about our new OneSearch discovery system

>> Browse our Subject Guides

Services to Support You

The staff at the Library will help you:

  • Locate information for assignments, research, instruction, personal use
  • Use all types of Library resources and search tools
  • Work with computers and applications such as Microsoft Office
  • Troubleshoot technical issues, including wireless and account log in
  • Find your way around the College and locate people who can help you

>> Learn more about RRC Library Services

Most importantly, we want you to know that you can ask us anything! We are here to support you!

Welcome! Take a Quick Tour of Your RRC Library

August 26, 2016

Red River College Library is so much more than books. Take a moment to check out what your Library has to offer! 

The Library Spaces

The Libraries at the Exchange District Campus (EDC) and Notre Dame Campus (NDC) provide you with reading areas, study spaces (individual and small group), media viewing areas, computers, printers, copiers, and a scanning station.

Exchange District Campus Library

Notre Dame Campus Library

Loads of Resources

All students and staff also have access to the Library’s books, e-books, journals, e-journals, databases, DVDs, streaming video, and audiovisual equipment. What you see when you walk in is just the tip of the iceberg. Many of our digital resources may be accessed in the comfort of your home and on your mobile device.

Learn more:
>> Search the Library’s catalogue
>> Browse EBSCOhost services
>> View streaming databases

Note: digital resources often require log in to view. Use the same username and password you use for all of your RRC accounts (e.g. LEARN, HUB, and wireless).

Services to Support You

The staff at the Library will help you:

  • Locate information
  • Use Library resources
  • Work with computers and applications
  • Troubleshoot technical issues
  • Find your way around the College
  • And more!

Most importantly, we want you to know that you can ask us anything! We are here to support you!

Learn more about Library Services >> RRC Library Services

 

Visit the Library Website

 

 

 

RRC Library Poster/Bookmark Contest

October 2, 2015

Please note: In this year’s art contest, unfortunately no entry met the criteria listed. As a result, we have not awarded a prize. We hope for a better outcome next time! (Updated 7 Dec 2015)

bookmarks

October is Canadian Library Month. Show off your artistic talent by creating a Library poster or bookmark!

The poster or bookmark should represent one of our many services such as the Library databases, reference help, etc. (See the guidelines below for complete details). Need ideas? Unsure what we have? Ask our staff! They would be happy to show you anything from how to log into databases to requesting books from Exchange District or Notre Dame Libraries.

Please make your entry colourful, creative, and be sure to include one of our organizational logos: (Library Wordmark Image | Red River College Logo Image) If you can free hand the logo with colored pencils have fun, or dust off Photoshop/Publisher for those with digital wizardry. If going the digital route, make sure anything used conforms with copyright restrictions. In other words, images must either be original or in the public domain.

Keep in mind the winner(s) may find their creation is actually used by the Library for promotional purposes!

Contest Rules/Guidelines

  • prizesOpen to all students
  • Size
    • 11 X 17” full colour poster,
      AND/OR
    • 5 X 8.5”  2-sided, full-colour bookmark
  • Topic: pick one of the following themes:
    • Extensive E‐book collection
    • Online Full-text Databases
    • Streaming Videos
    • Great Reference Desk help
      e.g. one-on-one research assistance; tutorials, etc.
    • Library (general ‐ must be specific to the RRC Library)
      e.g.  “Did you know our library offers …”
  • Use any media (i.e. coloured pencils, digital media, mulmedia, etc.) and style of art
    MUST BE YOUR ORIGINAL ART WORK – NO CLIPART
  • Write your namestudent numberand email or phone number clearly on the back of your poster or on the envelope for bookmarks.
  • All submissions must be turned in to either Library location by:
    4:30 pm on Friday October 30th, 2015.
  • Entries will be judged on:
    1. Quality of work
    2. Creativity
    3. Use of chosen topic
    4. Accuracy and clarity
  • Winning artwork and honourable mentions will be displayed in the Library and on our website. They may also be used for future promotions.

Contest frequently asked questions

  • How many posters/bookmarks can I enter?
    • One poster, one bookmark (total of 2 entries)
  • How big can the poster / bookmark be?
    • Posters are to be 11×17” (tabloid)
    • Bookmarks are to be 2.5×8.5” and should have a front and a back.
  • Do I have to use the RRC or Library logos? If so, where can I get them?
  • Can my entry be black and white?
    • We prefer full colour – unless your artistic vision says black and white!
  • Will I get my project back?
    • We have kept all entries in the past. If you would like your entry returned to you, please say so on the back of the poster or on the bookmark envelope. Please note that winning entries will be kept for some time regardless.
  • Can I make a poster on a topic not listed?
    • If it fits within the rules (our decision), then it’s OK.
  • Can I ask staff about the different services for more information?
    • Absolutely!
  • What goes on my entry?
    • Your name, student number, phone or email. If you want your entry back you should state this as well.
    • Please print clearly. If we can’t read it, we can’t contact you.
    • Information for bookmarks can be put on an envelope so that the original art isn’t damaged.
  • Do you have envelopes for posters?
    • Nope, put your information on the back.
  • Do you have envelopes for bookmarks?
    • Ask us.
  • Does my bookmark need to be printed double-sided?
    • It can be submitted in two parts (front and back) on paper as long as it conforms to the size specified.
  • Can I use 3-dimensional media?
    • The winning entries may be reproduced into promotional materials for the library. To do this we need to be able to make copies. 3D may limit our ability to do this at a reasonable cost. We won’t say no, but you should also submit a 2-dimensional print of your entry.
  • When does the contest close?
    • Oct 30 at 4:30 – nothing will be accepted after that.
  • When will we learn who won/honourable mentions?
    • A week or two after the contest ends.
  • Who will judge the contest?
    • Library staff will be the judges.
  • What are the prizes?
    • Tim’s card, Red card, or Bookstore credit for $50.
  • Do we supply paper? Anything else?
    • Supplies are on you.
  • What do you mean by copyrighted material/clipart?
    • Anything that someone else has created – e.g. downloaded from the internet, clip art from MSWord, photocopies, etc. Your entry must contain only original art created by your hand.
  • What materials can I use to create a poster?
    • Pencil crayon, pencil, ink, digital media, multimedia, etc.
  • Where can I find information on Canadian Library Month?