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Louis Riel Day

February 8, 2019

Check out the Notre Dame Campus Window Display for materials related to Louis Riel Day.

Since Monday 18 February 2019 is Louis Riel Day, we’d like to take a moment to encapsulate some of the important resources available to our patrons regarding the Métis people and Louis Riel, one of Manitoba’s most famous historical figures.

Who was Louis Riel?

Louis Riel, a leader of his people in their resistance against the Canadian government in the Canadian Northwest, is perhaps the most controversial figure in Canadian historiography. His life and deeds have spawned a massive and diverse literature.

He was born in the Red River Settlement (in what is now Manitoba) in 1844. A promising student, he was sent to Montreal to train for the priesthood, but he never graduated. An attempt at training as a lawyer ended similarly, and by 1868 Riel was back in the Red River area. Ambitious, well educated and bilingual, Riel quickly emerged as a leader among the Métis of the Red River.

Read More: http://library.usask.ca/northwest/background/riel.htm

Why Commemorate Louis Riel?

Louis Riel is recognized as an advocate of justice for the Métis people, but he represents much more. He helped lay the framework for minority rights and cultural co-operation, and is regarded as a founder of Manitoba. It is very important to remember Louis Riel’s contribution to Canada and specifically to recall that he was executed for being a persistent advocate for the rights of his people. (Reference: http://louisrielday.com/)

In 2008, Manitoba schools were invited to name our province’s newest holiday and 114 responded with suggestions that reflected Manitoba’s citizenship, history, culture, arts, sports and significant individuals from our past. Eleven schools submitted the winning entry and received $1,000 grants to purchase materials for their school library. (Reference: http://louisrielday.com/louis-riel-day-origins/)

Books and Videos

The Red River College Library has many items related to the Métis people and Louis Riel.

 

Song of Batoche

A historical novel about the Riel insurrection of 1885, largely from the point of view of the Métis women. It offers an interesting account of the lives of the Métis women as they move to support their husbands in the battle with Middleton. This includes Marguerite, Riel’s wife, and Madeleine, Dumont’s wife. There is also a good portrayal of Louis Riel and his struggle to create a homeland for the Métis on the South Saskatchewan and also to create a new Catholic religion. Also an interesting account of Dumont as he struggles to stay loyal to Riel as he begins to realize what Riel’s new religious views mean.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=130605

 

Rooster Town : the history of an urban Métis community, 1901-1961

A Métis enclave at Winnipeg’s edge. Melonville. Smokey Hollow. Bannock Town. Fort Tuyau. Little Chicago. Mud Flats. Pumpville. Tintown. La Coulee. These were some of the names given to Métis communities at the edges of urban areas in Manitoba. Rooster Town, which was on the outskirts of southwest Winnipeg endured from 1901 to 1961. Those years in Winnipeg were characterized by the twin pressures of depression and inflation, chronic housing shortages, and a spotty social support network. At the city’s edge, Rooster Town grew without city services as rural Métis arrived to participate in the urban economy and build their own houses while keeping Métis culture and community as a central part of their lives.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=132986

 

Quiet revolution west : the rebirth of Métis nationalism

Explores various dimensions of the renaissance of the Métis nation in western Canada. It also explains Métis nationalism and the Métis nationalist movement as a historical and contemporary force in Canadian politics. In paying particular attention to the interplay of this nationalist movement with Canada’s constitutional initiatives starting with Pierre Elliott Trudeau, it is the story of how a people’s historic struggle for nationhood within Canadian federalism has become an essential part of Canada’s attempt to redefine itself since patriation.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=100015

 

Louis Riel : let justice be done

Louis Riel, prophet of the new world and founder of the Canadian province of Manitoba, has challenged Canadian politics, history and religion since the early years of Confederation. In Canada’s most important and controversial state trial, Riel was found guilty of “high treason,” sentenced to hang and executed on November 16, 1885. Was the execution of Riel the hanging of a traitor? Or the legal murder of a patriot and statesman? As reconciliation with Indigenous peoples is on the minds of many today, these are questions that must receive thoughtful answers. Weaving together Riel’s words, writing and recent historical research, long-time Riel activist David Doyle provides Louis Riel with the opportunity for the first time to give his own account of his political career so as to assume his proper place in Canada’s history as its Indigenous (Métis) Father of Confederation.

https://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=130121

 

Louis Riel : firebrand

Louis Riel devoted his life to the Metis cause. A fiery activist, he struggled against injustice as he saw it. He was a pioneer in the field of Aboriginal rights and land claims but was branded an outlaw in his own time. In 1885, he was executed for treason. In 1992, the House of Commons declared Riel a founder of Manitoba. November 16 is now designated Louis Riel Day in Canada.

http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=100518

 

 

Louis Riel : a comic-strip biography

Chester Brown reinvents the comic-book medium to create the critically acclaimed historical biography Louis Riel, winning the Harvey Awards for best writing and best graphic novel for his compelling, meticulous, and dispassionate retelling of the charismatic, and perhaps insane, nineteenth-century Métis leader. Brown coolly documents with dramatic subtlety the violent rebellion on the Canadian prairie led by Riel, who some regard a martyr who died in the name of freedom, while others consider him a treacherous murderer.

http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=87977

 

 

Louis Riel

Champion of a people or traitorous rabble-rouser? Political visionary or religious lunatic? Louis Riel is one of the most ambiguous figures in Canadian history, a man who stood and fell for the Métis nation. Read about the fascinating western icon in this well-paced biography. The doomed struggle of Louis Riel and his Métis people against the new Canadian government is a story rich in drama and cultural change.

https://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=86278

 

 

Riel’s Defence : Perspectives on His Speeches

In 1885, Louis Riel was charged with high treason, found guilty, and consequently executed for his role in Saskatchewan’s North-West Rebellion. During his trial, the Métis leader gave two speeches, passionately defending the interests of the Métis in western Canada as well as his own life. Riel’s Defence studies these speeches, demonstrating the range of Riel’s political and personal concerns.

https://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=123784

 

 

Riel (Video on Demand) (Login Required)

A nostalgic look back at the 1979 Dramatization of the Riel Rebellion of 1885. Under their leader, Louis Riel, the Métis rose up against the government of Sir John A. MacDonald. Stars Raymond Cloutier as Louis Riel. Also includes Roger Blay, Maury Chaykin, Arthur Hill, Leslie Nielsen, Christopher Plummer and William Shatner in supporting roles. (Converted from VHS)

http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=32674

 

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month

February 6, 2019

Black History Month (Graphic by Linda Fox)

February is Black History Month, and you are invited to browse Red River College Library materials that celebrate black Canadians, and their experiences, stories, achievements and contributions.

Books

Viola Desmond's Canada : a history of Blacks and racial segregation in the promised landViola Desmond’s Canada : a history of Blacks and racial segregation in the promised land

In 1946, a Black Halifax businesswoman, Viola Desmond, was wrongfully arrested for sitting in a white’s-only section of a movie theatre in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia. In 2010, sixty-four years later, the Nova Scotia government recognized this gross miscarriage of justice and posthumously granted her a free pardon. Most Canadians are aware of Rosa Parks, the American civil rights icon who refused to give up her seat on a racially segregated bus in Alabama, but Viola Desmond’s similar act of courage in resisting the practice of racial segregation occurred nine years before this historic event. However, today, even after the Nova Scotia Government’s unprecedented pardon of Desmond, many Canadians are still unaware of her story or that racial segregation existed throughout many parts of Canada during most of the twentieth century.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=128252

 

Done with Slavery (eBook)

Did slavery exist in Montreal, and if so what did it look like? Frank Mackey grapples with this question in Done with Slavery, a study of black Montrealers in the eighty years between the British Conquest and the union of Lower and Upper Canada. Through close examination of archival and contemporary sources, Mackey uncovers largely unknown aspects of the black transition from slavery to freedom. While he considers the changing legal status of slavery, much of the book provides a detailed and nuanced reconstruction of the circumstances of black Montrealers and their lived experience. The resulting picture is remarkably complex, showing the variety of occupations held by blacks, the relationships they had with those they served, their encounters with the judicial and political systems, and the racial mingling that came with intermarriage and apprenticeships.

https://login.athena.rrc.mb.ca:2047/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nlebk&AN=404084&site=eds-live

 

Black Canadians : history, experiences, social conditions

For researchers seeking detailed information about the black diaspora in North America, this authoritative reference provides more than 300 years of black Canadian history, from the first migration of slaves, black loyalists, and Civil War refugees to the expansive movement brought about by the establishment of the point system in 1967. Venturing beyond established orthodoxies and simplistic solutions to discuss contentious ethno-racial problems in Canada, this critique addresses housing, the labor market, sports management, and race and ethnic relations. This new edition expands the regional coverage of black history, updates all the statistics with the 2006 census data, and adds important new material on multiculturalism and employment equity.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=111040

 

CBC Curio: Celebrating Black History Month

February is Black History Month in Canada, which provides an opportunity to celebrate the achievements of black Canadians and reflect on the stories, experiences and accomplishments of Canada’s black community. To mark this occasion, Curio.ca has pulled together a selection of resource guides, videos and audio series that honour black history in Canada. (RRC Login is required to view this resource)

Link: CBC Curio: Celebrating Black History Month

 

NFB: The Black Experience in Canada: A Rich History

To celebrate the history of Black Canadians, The National Film Board of Canada (NFB) has selected a group of films that portray the multi-layered lived experience of Canada’s diverse Black communities. The incredible stories of strength, courage and perseverance in the face of adversity that these films present are not often found in mainstream history books. Black communities and cultures have been part of Canadian history from its earliest days, but sadly, their contributions and the lessons they can teach are rarely studied at the elementary or secondary level in schools.  (RRC Login is required to view this resource)

Link: The Black Experience in Canada: A Rich History

 

The Teaching Professor

January 2, 2019

The Library has purchased a subscription to the online journal The Teaching Professor.

The Teaching Professor was founded in 1987 with a simple goal in mind: Create a newsletter that helps college faculty improve their teaching, share best practices, and stay current on the latest pedagogical research.

Since that time, The Teaching Professor has become a trusted guide for tens of thousands of educators who are committed to creating a better learning environment. The new Teaching Professor, launched August 2018, reflects the changing needs of today’s college faculty and the students they teach. This new fully online version includes everything readers have loved about The Teaching Professor for so many years—great articles and practical, evidence-based insights—but it also contains many new features and formats that will make it an even more indispensable resource.

Each week readers can expect thought-provoking and actionable advice on a wealth of critical topics, including:

  • Improving student learning
  • Designing effective activities and assignments
  • Energizing and re-inspiring yourself in mid-career
  • Promoting academic integrity
  • Responding to course evaluations and feedback
  • Dealing with difficult students
  • Getting students to read what’s assigned

Reference: https://www-teachingprofessor-com.athena.rrc.mb.ca:2047/

You may find a link to the The Teaching Professor in the Library’s A-Z Database page at library.rrc.ca.

Posted by Mark Nelson – RRC Library

Award-Winning Animation, Documentaries and Films

December 14, 2018

Whether you are in a contemplative mood or looking for fun, holidays are a wonderful time to sit back and enjoy great video. These featured award-winners are available to Red River College staff and students “on demand”… ready when you are, on whatever device you choose (RRC username and password required).

For more information on our streaming video collection, visit our Streaming Video guide.

Animation

The National Film Board (NFB) has a global reputation for their award-winning animation, a few of which are shown below. Want to see more? Visit the animation section of the NFB website.

Bob's Birthday Cover Art

Special Delivery cover art

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bob’s Birthday

This film took home an Oscar® for Best Animated Short Film. A witty, offbeat animated portrait of a frustrated dentist wrestling with the fundamental issues of life proves that birthdays (and surprise parties) can be very tricky indeed.

The Cat Came Back

Hilarious Oscar®-nominated animation based on the century-old folk song of the same name. Old Mr. Johnson makes increasingly manic attempts to rid himself of a little yellow cat that just won’t stay away… Also won the 1989 Genie Award for best animated short film.

The Danish Poet

This Oscar®-winning short animation follows Kasper, a poet whose creative well has run dry, on a holiday to Norway to meet the famous writer Sigrid Undset.

Special Delivery

In this Oscar®-winning animated short, Ralph’s day gets off to a bad start when he dismisses his wife’s orders to clear the snow from the front walk. When he comes home and finds the mailman dead on his front stairs, Ralph attempts a massive cover-up with disastrous results.

Documentaries

Documentaries are a great way to open up your mind to new ideas. The following award-winners are so effective that instructors have incorporated them into their teaching plans.

Alive Inside cover artChina Rises cover artGriefwalker cover art

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alive Inside 

A joyous cinematic exploration of music’s capacity to reawaken our souls and uncover the deepest parts of our humanity. (Winner of multiple awards)

China Rises

A four-part groundbreaking documentary special that takes you inside modern China like no other program has ever done. The series is a vibrant portrait of an ascending power.

Griefwalker

Portrayal of palliative caregiver Stephen Jenkinson. This film shows Tim Wilson’s dealing with his denial of his own death where he almost succumbed to an illness, and coping with the near death of someone close to him. Jenkinson explains something that is uncomfortable for most Westerners to hear, that death and grief are woven into the fabric of life and that death is something to be ‘befriended’.

Invisible City 

A moving story of two boys from Regent Park crossing into adulthood – their mothers and mentors rooting for them to succeed; their environment and social pressures tempting them to make poor choices. (Winner of the Best Canadian Feature at 2009 Hot Docs)

Films

Ready to be captured by a great story? In case you have little ones at home, the first two listed here are suitable for family viewing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beasts of the Southern Wild

Hushpuppy is a six-year-old living in an isolated bayou community. When her father Wink becomes ill, she sets off for the outside world in an attempt to help him. The journey to save her father is delayed by a ‘busted’ universe that reverses weather patterns and brings about long-extinct animals. Can Hushpuppy save the day? (Recipient of multiple awards and nominations, including four Academy Award nominations)

The Lion King

A lion cub crown prince is tricked by a treacherous uncle into thinking he caused his father’s death and flees into exile in despair, only to learn in adulthood his identity and his responsibilities. Winner of two Oscars®.

Once Were Warriors

A family descended from Maori warriors is bedeviled by a violent father and the societal problems of being treated as outcasts. Based on the novel by Alan Duff. (Winner of multiple awards)

Sex Traffic

This award-winning drama weaves the lives of four people, culminating in a disturbing look at the trafficking of sex slaves in Eastern Europe and beyond. Contains sensitive images and language. (Winner of 8 BAFTA awards)

Comments or Questions?

If you have any comments or questions about video resources at RRC Library, or you are an instructor and would like to recommend a purchase, please email us at AV@rrc.ca, call at 204-632-2231, or visit us in person in the Library.

Posted by Linda Fox — RRC Library

Holiday Reading – Award Winning Books

December 7, 2018

It’s always nice to relax at this time of the year, and there’s no better way to relax than to dive into a good book. During the upcoming holidays, why not take some time for yourself and read one of the many award winning books that are available in the Red River College Library.

To view a selection of award winning books, come visit the Library Window Display at the Notre Dame Campus. You may also view a complete list of all books in our display. If you see something you like, just ask at our Circualtion desk.

Here is a small sample of some of the excellent titles:

Jonny Appleseed : a novel / Joshua Whitehead

Off the reserve and trying to find ways to live and love in the big city, Jonny Appleseed, a young Two-Spirit/Indigiqueer, becomes a cybersex worker who fetishizes himself in order to make a living. Jonny’s world is a series of breakages, appendages, and linkages – and as he goes through the motions of preparing to return home for his step-father’s funeral, he learns how to put together the pieces of his life. Jonny Appleseed is a unique, shattering vision of Indigenous life, full of grit, glitter, and dreams.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=132461

 

Marrow thieves / Cherie Dimaline

In a future world ravaged by global warming, people have lost the ability to dream, and the dreamlessness has led to widespread madness. The only people still able to dream are North America’s indigenous population – and it is their marrow that holds the cure for the rest of the world. But getting the marrow – and dreams – means death for the unwilling donors. Driven to flight, a 15-year-old and his companions struggle for survival, attempt to reunite with loved ones, and take refuge from the “recruiters” who seek them out to bring them to the marrow-stealing ‘factories.’

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=130399

 

Minds of winter / Ed O’Loughlin

Fay Morgan and Nelson Nilsson have each arrived in Inuvik, Canada — 120 miles north of the Arctic Circle — searching for answers about a family member: Nelson for his estranged older brother, Fay for her disappeared grandfather. They soon learn that these two men have an unexpected link — a hidden share in one of the greatest enduring mysteries of polar exploration. This is the riddle of the ‘Arnold 294’ chronometer, which reappeared in Britain over a hundred years after it was recorded as lost in the Arctic with the ships and men of Sir John Franklin’s Northwest Passage expedition. The secret history of this elusive timepiece, Fay and Nelson will discover, ties them and their families to a journey that echoes across two centuries.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=130481

 

Son of a trickster / Eden Robinson

Everyone knows a guy like Jared: the burnout kid in high school who sells weed cookies and has a scary mom who’s often wasted and wielding some kind of weapon. Jared does smoke and drink too much, and he does make the best cookies in town, and his mom is a mess, but he’s also a kid who has an immense capacity for compassion and an impulse to watch over people more than twice his age, and he can’t rely on anyone for consistent love and support, except for his flatulent pit bull, Baby Killer (he calls her Baby)–and now she’s dead. Jared can’t count on his mom to stay sober and stick around to take care of him. He can’t rely on his dad to pay the bills and support his new wife and step-daughter. Jared is only sixteen but feels like he is the one who must stabilize his family’s life, even look out for his elderly neighbours. But he struggles to keep everything afloat … and sometimes he blacks out. And he puzzles over why his maternal grandmother has never liked him, why she says he’s the son of a trickster, that he isn’t human. Mind you, ravens speak to him–even when he’s not stoned. You think you know Jared, but you don’t.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=130547

 

Hot milk / Deborah Levy

I have been sleuthing my mother’s symptoms for as long as I can remember. If I see myself as an unwilling detective with a desire for justice, is her illness an unsolved crime? If so, who is the villain and who is the victim? Sofia, a young anthropologist, has spent much of her life trying to solve the mystery of her mother’s unexplainable illness. She is frustrated with Rose and her constant complaints, but utterly relieved to be called to abandon her own disappointing fledgling adult life. She and her mother travel to the searing, arid coast of southern Spain to see a famous consultant– their very last chance– in the hope that he might cure her unpredictable limb paralysis. But Dr. Gomez has strange methods that seem to have little to do with physical medicine, and as the treatment progresses, Sofia’s mother’s illness becomes increasingly baffling. Sophia’s role as detective– tracking her mother’s symptoms in an attempt to find the secret motivation for her pain– deepens as she discovers her own desires in this transient desert community. Hot Milk is a profound exploration of the sting of sexuality, of unspoken female rage, of myth and modernity, the lure of hypochondria and big pharma, and, above all, the value of experimenting with life; of being curious, bewildered, and vitally alive to the world.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=128498

 

All that man is / David Szalay

Nine men. Each of them at a different stage in life, each of them away from home, and each of them striving–in the suburbs of Prague, in an overdeveloped Alpine village, beside a Belgian motorway, in a dingy Cyprus hotel–to understand what it means to be alive, here and now. Tracing a dramatic arc from the spring of youth to the winter of old age, the ostensibly separate narratives of All That Man Is aggregate into a picture of a single shared existence, a picture that interrogates the state of modern manhood while bringing to life, unforgettably, the physical and emotional terrain of an increasingly globalized Europe. And so these nine lives form an ingenious and new kind of novel, in which David Szalay expertly plots a dark predicament for the twenty-first-century man.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=128518

 

Posted by Mark Nelson – RRC Library

Cannabis Awareness: Videos Worth Watching

October 17, 2018

Photo credit: pixabay.com

Many Canadians are celebrating today as licensed cannabis stores across Canada open their doors to the public. Recreational cannabis use is now legal, but not without restrictions and potential danger to those who misuse it. Perhaps more than ever we need cannabis awareness – not only of the laws surrounding it, but also the health effects and risks it presents.

The Legalities

The following links provide legal information about the use of cannabis:

The Risks: Watch and Learn

The Cannabis Awareness Video Collection – now on display at AV Services, NDC Library – will open your eyes with scientific facts and personal stories related to cannabis use. All staff and students at the College have access to the video collection. Please contact us if you have any questions.

View the list of videos here >> Cannabis Awareness Video Collection

Questions or comments? We’d Love to Hear From You!

Library – CM35
Notre Dame Campus
204-632-2231

Library – P214
Exchange District Campus
204-949-8370

–Posted by Linda Fox

Orange Shirt Day: September 30th

September 24, 2018

Orange Shirt Day occurs annually on Sept 30th and recognizes the harms done to our Indigenous communities, friends and family by the Residential School System.

Orange Shirt Day is a legacy of the St. Joseph Mission (SJM) residential school commemoration event held in Williams Lake, BC, Canada, in the spring of 2013. It grew out of Phyllis’ story of having her shiny new orange shirt taken away on her first day of school at the Mission, and it has become an opportunity to keep the discussion on all aspects of residential schools happening annually.

The date was chosen because it is the time of year in which children were taken from their homes to residential schools, and because it is an opportunity to set the stage for anti-racism and anti-bullying policies for the coming school year. It also gives teachers time to plan events that will include children, as we want to ensure that we are passing the story and learning on to the next generations.

Orange Shirt Day is also an opportunity for First Nations, local governments, schools and communities to come together in the spirit of reconciliation and hope for generations of children to come.

Reference: http://www.orangeshirtday.org/ 

 

Residential Schools: GuideResidential Schools Guide

Prepared by Library staff member Joan Boersma the Residential Schools Guide places many “residential schools” resources at your fingertips.

In the guide you will find books about survivors, documentaries and videos, eBooks, survivors stories and links to resources such as the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation where the “Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission” may be viewed.

Residential Schools Guide:
https://rrclibrary.libguides.com/ResidentialSchools

Notre Dame Campus “Orange Shirt Day” Window Display

Red River College Library has recognized Orange Shirt Day with a window display outside the Notre Dame Campus Library. We have also placed a selection of books in the display. Come by and see what is available, or view a complete list of all books in our display. If you see something you like, inquire at the Circulation Desk inside the library.

Orange Shirt Day Video Collection

September 20, 2018

Orange Shirt Day (September 30) is an official day to honour and build awareness of residential school survivors.

The Original Orange Shirt

Phyllis Webstad describes her first day at the residential school:

“When I got to the Mission, they stripped me, and took away my clothes, including the orange shirt! I never wore it again. I didn’t understand why they wouldn’t give it back to me, it was mine! The color orange has always reminded me of that and how my feelings didn’t matter, how no one cared and how I felt like I was worth nothing. All of us little children were crying and no one cared.” 

–Phyllis Webstad, Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation
(Source: orangeshirtday.org)

Because of this story and the mistreatment it represents, the orange shirt has become a permanent symbol of remembrance for residential school survivors. According to The Orange Shirt Day Act, September 30 now officially bears the name “Orange Shirt Day.”

>> Read more: Phyllis’s Story: The Original Orange Shirt

The Orange Shirt Day Video Collection

We were children - by NFB

AV Services Presents The Orange Shirt Day Video Collection (photo credit: NFB.ca)

AV Services has curated a collection of videos to honour Orange Shirt Day, now on display outside AV Services in the Library. For your convenience, many of these titles are streamed and available to you anywhere, anytime, on any device (RRC staff or student log in required).

View the list of titles here >> The Orange Shirt Day Video Collection

Questions or Suggestions? Please Contact Us

Library – CM35
Notre Dame Campus
204-632-2231

Library – P214
Exchange District Campus
204-949-8370

–Posted by Linda Fox

Earth Day 2018: Sunday April 22

April 13, 2018

Attribution: https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidstanleytravel/28255487842

The theme for this year’s Earth Day is End Plastic Pollution

From poisoning and injuring marine life to disrupting human hormones, from littering our beaches and landscapes to clogging our waste streams and landfills, the exponential growth of plastics is now threatening the survival of our planet.

In response, Earth Day 2018 is dedicated to providing the information and
inspiration needed to fundamentally change human attitude and behavior about plastics.

Click on the link to learn more and be part of the solution to plastic pollution: https://www.earthday.org/

Library Resources

The Red River College Library has a wide variety of materials related to recycling, as well as environmental issues, impact, and sustainability. We encourage our staff and students to search our online catalogue for more resources. In addition you can come check out our Earth Day window display at The Notre Dame Campus Library where we have placed related print resources. Read More →

IBISWorld Industry Research Database

April 5, 2018

The Red River College Library now subscribes to the “IBISWorld” industry research database.

Through this subscription, RRC patrons have access to 425 Canadian & 1,350 US industry research reports, covering:

  • Industry Performance
  • Forecasted Growth
  • Product & Customer Segmentation
  • Competition Levels
  • External Drivers
  • Major Companies
  • Operating Environment
  • Key Statistics

More specifically, this resource provides access to Canadian and US industry reports containing trends, market size, market share of major companies, industry statistics and financial ratios, competitive landscape and key external forces affecting supply and demand within the industry, and industry growth rates.

About this Industry

For example, a feature called “About this Industry” provides an outline of what the industry is and what it includes. It looks at the industry definition, supply chain, major players, main activities, similar industries, additional resources; and Jargon and Glossary. You can use this snapshot to quickly assess whether this industry report contains the information that you’re seeking.

Access to IBISWorld

RRC Patrons may find the IBISWorld access link in our A-Z list of Databases.