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Increasing Accessibility to Educational Videos: A Joint Project between AV Services and Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services

September 19, 2019

laptop with closed captioned symbol on screen

Background

In March, 2019, AV Services and Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services received a $25,000 grant from The Winnipeg Foundation to support a project that will increase accessibility to instructional video at Red River College. Through the joint effort of these two departments, in partnership with the Manitoba Association of Visual Language Interpreters (M.A.V.L.I.), this project aims to provide closed captioning to 20,000 minutes of video from Red River College Library’s streaming collection.

Why Closed Captions are Essential

As many know, video resources are a staple component in most course curriculum at the College. The use of captioned streaming video as an instructional tool supports universal course design and provides educational equity for people who have a hearing disability. For this reason, providing captions to streaming video has been targeted as an essential step in satisfying the Information and Communications Accessibility Standard as laid out in the Accessibility for Manitobans Act and the College’s Accessibility Plan.

Added Benefits for All

While the project’s primary aim is to make educational video accessible to the Deaf or Hard of Hearing, as well as those with disabilities, there are added benefits for those without a disability. Some of the secondary benefits of this project include:

  • CPC CaptionMaker software package, if purchased, would enable quick one-off captioning of videos and would allow the Library and other Departments to add closed captions to videos as well (pending vendor/author approval).
  • Computerized note takers, who provide a valuable service to the College through the school year, would receive compensation for their skills during summer months when they normally face a reduction in hours.
  • Videos that are captioned would maximize learning for all by enhancing different learning styles, allowing videos to be watched in noisy or quiet environments, and aiding comprehension for ESL learners.
  • Closed captions make some videos searchable, meaning that the viewer can search for and locate a word or phrase within the video efficiently.

Support Required to Keep it Going

While the grant money has been well-utilized and the project has been a success, it is only a start. As new students arrive, courses evolve, and the Library’s collection expands, the demand to produce captioned videos will not go away. Financial support to cover the staffing, software, and miscellaneous fees will be required, and the results produced by our departments are an encouraging step toward justifying that support.

Note of Appreciation to Supporters and Staff

The Winnipeg Foundation logoWe would like to thank The Winnipeg Foundation and M.A.V.L.I. for their support in getting this project off the ground. We also extend our appreciation to the staff in Library Services and Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services who led the project as well as those behind the scenes who dedicated their time and energy to produce the final product.

Suggest a Video for Captioning

For more information on this project, or to suggest a video for captioning, please contact:

  • Charlene Tweed, Supervisor, Library Resource Management
    ctweed@rrc.ca | 204-632-2389
  • Jill Patterson, Manager, Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services
    jpatterson@rrc.ca | 204-632-3092

Associations Canada Online

June 21, 2019

Are you looking for organizations and contacts for student work placements? Does your department or program engage in community outreach? Perhaps it’s time to reinvigorate your organizational and community networking and contact lists.

The Library is excited to highlight the new Associations Canada Online database, which provides detailed profiles to over 20,000 Canadian and international organizations and associations, including nearly 1,000 from Manitoba. Each profile includes names, full addresses, complete contact information including website and social media addresses, budgets, sources of funding, and much more.

Other information found in the database:

Meetings, Conferences & Conventions
When and where events are happening in your field.

Awards, Scholarships & Grants
Details on awards and grants offered by Canadian associations.

Registered Charitable Organizations
Lists of associations that are registered charities, searchable by subject.

Search through the database with a seemingly endless number of search fields and limiters (budget size, city, contact name, number of employees, membership fees, etc.), and find out firsthand just how useful the resource can be for your department. Find the database on the Library Homepage under Articles/Databases, or use this link.

Blog author: Jordan Zimmerly

Earth Day 2019

April 15, 2019

Earth day AV display ad

With more than 1 billion people participating in Earth Day activities each year, Earth Day (April 22) has become the world’s largest environmental movement. To celebrate Earth Day, AV Services at the Notre Dame Campus Library has put together a selection of intriguing videos designed to inform us about environmental issues. We invite you to come by the Library and find something to watch or stay online and view in streaming mode (log in required).

Learn more: Earth Day 2019 Videos

Earth Day 2019 Video Highlights

Streaming Video

Below are four streaming video highlights from Earth Day 2019 selections. For more options, try your own search of the Library’s collection (examples below):

Carbon nation cover artTrou story cover art Toxic trespass cover art This changes everything cover art

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summaries

Carbon nation  A documentary movie about climate change solutions. Even if you doubt the severity of the impact of climate change or just don’t buy it at all, this is still a compelling and relevant film that illustrates how solutions to climate change also address other social, economic and national security issues.

Trou Story  The history of mining in Canada is the story of astronomical profits made with disregard for the environment and human health. Using striking images, rare archival footage, interviews and their trademark humorous social commentary, the directors make a compelling case against the way mining has been done in Canada.

Toxic Trespass  Delves into the chemical soup that surrounds us and that we’ve taken for granted. We meet passionate activists, doctors and scientists who see clear evidence of often-denied links between the environment and health, and are working for change.

This Changes Everything  Presents seven powerful portraits of communities on the front lines, from Montana’s Powder River Basin to the Alberta Tar Sands, from the coast of South India to Beijing and beyond. Interwoven with these stories of struggle is Klein’s narration, connecting the carbon in the air with the economic system that put it there.

DVDs

Below are four DVD highlights from Earth Day 2019 selections. We invite you to search our catalogue to find what interests you and/or visit the Library for friendly and knowledgeable service.

Racing to zero cover art Mother: caring for 7 billion cover art Trees in trouble cover art Queen of the sun cover art

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summaries

Racing to Zero  Follows the collective zero waste efforts of San Francisco, which is successfully taking the necessary steps: increased recycling, creative re-purposing, composting to recycle organics back into the earth, and changing patterns of production and consumption. Diminishing non-recyclables have already radically reduced the amount of garbage that is sent to the city’s landfills.

Mother: Caring for 7 Billion  Brings to light an issue that silently fuels our largest environmental, humanitarian and social crises – population growth. Since the 1960s the world population has nearly doubled, adding more than 3 billion people. At the same time, talking about population has become politically incorrect because of the sensitivity of the issues surrounding the topic- religion, economics, family planning, and gender inequality. The film illustrates both the over consumption and the inequity side of the population issue.

Trees in Trouble  When the emerald ash borer invaded Cincinnati, thousands of trees died and the city nearly went broke responding to the problem. This film documents the situation in Cincinnati and explores the history of urban forestry, the environmental and social benefits of trees in cities, and the dangers posed by invasive insect species.

Queen of the Sun  Taking us on a journey through the catastrophic disappearance of bees and the mysterious world of the beehive, this engaging and ultimately uplifting film weaves an unusual and dramatic story of the heartfelt struggles of beekeepers, scientists and philosophers from around the world.

Learn more: AV Services on the Web >> library.rrc.ca/av

 

–Posted by Linda Fox, Library Services

Videos for International Women’s Day #BalanceforBetter

March 7, 2019

International Women's Day banner

International Women’s Day, 2019 #BalanceforBetter

For over a century, March 8 has been declared International Women’s Day. This day is about celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women and promoting gender equality. This year’s theme, #BalanceforBetter, is accompanied by the following explanation:

“Balance is not a women’s issue, it’s a business issue. The race is on for the gender-balanced boardroom, a gender-balanced government, gender-balanced media coverage, a gender-balance of employees, more gender-balance in wealth, gender-balanced sports coverage … Gender balance is essential for economies and communities to thrive.”
(Source: www.internationalwomensday.com/Theme)

NDC Library Video Display Available Until March 13

Just like International Women’s Day, effective video is a powerful means to increase awareness about women’s issues. We encourage you to check out our video display at NDC Library, AV Services (available until March 13, 2019). Below are a few highlights and some streaming suggestions.

DVD Highlights

He named me Malala cover artKilling us softly 4 cover art

Hidden figures cover art

In the name of the family cover art

 

 

 

 

 

 


He Named Me Malala

An intimate portrait of Malala Yousafzai, who was wounded when Taliban gunmen opened fire on her in Pakistan’s Swat Valley. The shooting of the then fifteen-year-old teenager sparked international media outrage. She has since emerged as a leading campaigner for the rights of children worldwide and is the youngest-ever Nobel Peace Prize Laureate.

Killing Us Softly 4: Advertising’s Image of Women

Jean Kilbourne takes a fresh look at how advertising traffics in distorted and destructive ideals of femininity. A range of new print and television advertisements lay bare a stunning pattern of damaging gender stereotypes–images and messages that too often reinforce unrealistic, and unhealthy, perceptions of beauty, perfection, and sexuality. Also available in streaming format.

Hidden Figures

As the United States raced against Russia to put a man in space, NASA found untapped talent in a group of African-American female mathematicians that served as the brains behind one of the greatest operations in U.S. history. Crossing all gender, race, and professional lines, their brilliance and desire to dream big firmly cemented them in U.S. history as true American heroes.

In the Name of the Family

Friends and family of murdered girls paint a chilling portrait of the forces that led to their deaths, and Toronto schoolgirls talk about their lives of constant fear. This documentary challenges the traditions that lie behind the heartbreaking tragedies committed against young girls caught between two cultures in North America.

Streaming Video Highlights

Here are some selections from RRC Library’s video databases — Curio.ca and NFB Campus. To learn more about our complete streaming video collection, visit our Streaming Video guide. A Red River College user ID and password is required to view all online content.

Missing and murdered collection

How much do you know…?

 

 

 

 

 

 


 Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Collection

The statistics on missing and murdered indigenous women are stark and staggering. The videos in this collection present a snapshot of the situation and recount the stories of the families and communities affected by this national tragedy. (Curio.ca)

Who were the key women in Canadian history? How well do we know their stories? Moderated by Marivel Taruc, host of CBC’s Our Toronto, the panel includes: Pamela Sugiman, Ryerson University; Funke Aladejebi, York University; and Tarah Brookfield, Wilfrid Laurier University. (Curio.ca)

Gulistan, land of roses

The world before her

 

 

 

 

 

 


 Gulîstan, Land of Roses

Travels deep into the mountains and deserts of Kurdistan, where armed female guerillas defend Kurdish territory against ISIS. These women share their most intimate thoughts and offer a window into this largely unknown world. This film exposes the hidden feminist face of a revolutionary group united by a common vision of freedom. (NFB Campus)

The World Before Her

Sweeps back the curtain to reveal the intimate stories of young women determined to win the Miss Indian pageant and the forces that oppose them. Hindu fundamentalists view pageants and their “international” beauty standards as immoral and a symbol of the rapid Westernization of India; protests are common. (NFB Campus)

Explore more:

 

 

 

 


 Comments or Questions?

If you have any comments or questions about video resources at RRC Library, or you are an instructor and would like to recommend a purchase, please email us at AV@rrc.ca, call at 204-632-2231, or visit us in person in the Library.

 

Posted by Linda Fox — RRC Library

 

Louis Riel Day

February 8, 2019

Check out the Notre Dame Campus Window Display for materials related to Louis Riel Day.

Since Monday 18 February 2019 is Louis Riel Day, we’d like to take a moment to encapsulate some of the important resources available to our patrons regarding the Métis people and Louis Riel, one of Manitoba’s most famous historical figures.

Who was Louis Riel?

Louis Riel, a leader of his people in their resistance against the Canadian government in the Canadian Northwest, is perhaps the most controversial figure in Canadian historiography. His life and deeds have spawned a massive and diverse literature.

He was born in the Red River Settlement (in what is now Manitoba) in 1844. A promising student, he was sent to Montreal to train for the priesthood, but he never graduated. An attempt at training as a lawyer ended similarly, and by 1868 Riel was back in the Red River area. Ambitious, well educated and bilingual, Riel quickly emerged as a leader among the Métis of the Red River.

Read More: http://library.usask.ca/northwest/background/riel.htm

Why Commemorate Louis Riel?

Louis Riel is recognized as an advocate of justice for the Métis people, but he represents much more. He helped lay the framework for minority rights and cultural co-operation, and is regarded as a founder of Manitoba. It is very important to remember Louis Riel’s contribution to Canada and specifically to recall that he was executed for being a persistent advocate for the rights of his people. (Reference: http://louisrielday.com/)

In 2008, Manitoba schools were invited to name our province’s newest holiday and 114 responded with suggestions that reflected Manitoba’s citizenship, history, culture, arts, sports and significant individuals from our past. Eleven schools submitted the winning entry and received $1,000 grants to purchase materials for their school library. (Reference: http://louisrielday.com/louis-riel-day-origins/)

Books and Videos

The Red River College Library has many items related to the Métis people and Louis Riel.

 

Song of Batoche

A historical novel about the Riel insurrection of 1885, largely from the point of view of the Métis women. It offers an interesting account of the lives of the Métis women as they move to support their husbands in the battle with Middleton. This includes Marguerite, Riel’s wife, and Madeleine, Dumont’s wife. There is also a good portrayal of Louis Riel and his struggle to create a homeland for the Métis on the South Saskatchewan and also to create a new Catholic religion. Also an interesting account of Dumont as he struggles to stay loyal to Riel as he begins to realize what Riel’s new religious views mean.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=130605

 

Rooster Town : the history of an urban Métis community, 1901-1961

A Métis enclave at Winnipeg’s edge. Melonville. Smokey Hollow. Bannock Town. Fort Tuyau. Little Chicago. Mud Flats. Pumpville. Tintown. La Coulee. These were some of the names given to Métis communities at the edges of urban areas in Manitoba. Rooster Town, which was on the outskirts of southwest Winnipeg endured from 1901 to 1961. Those years in Winnipeg were characterized by the twin pressures of depression and inflation, chronic housing shortages, and a spotty social support network. At the city’s edge, Rooster Town grew without city services as rural Métis arrived to participate in the urban economy and build their own houses while keeping Métis culture and community as a central part of their lives.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=132986

 

Quiet revolution west : the rebirth of Métis nationalism

Explores various dimensions of the renaissance of the Métis nation in western Canada. It also explains Métis nationalism and the Métis nationalist movement as a historical and contemporary force in Canadian politics. In paying particular attention to the interplay of this nationalist movement with Canada’s constitutional initiatives starting with Pierre Elliott Trudeau, it is the story of how a people’s historic struggle for nationhood within Canadian federalism has become an essential part of Canada’s attempt to redefine itself since patriation.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=100015

 

Louis Riel : let justice be done

Louis Riel, prophet of the new world and founder of the Canadian province of Manitoba, has challenged Canadian politics, history and religion since the early years of Confederation. In Canada’s most important and controversial state trial, Riel was found guilty of “high treason,” sentenced to hang and executed on November 16, 1885. Was the execution of Riel the hanging of a traitor? Or the legal murder of a patriot and statesman? As reconciliation with Indigenous peoples is on the minds of many today, these are questions that must receive thoughtful answers. Weaving together Riel’s words, writing and recent historical research, long-time Riel activist David Doyle provides Louis Riel with the opportunity for the first time to give his own account of his political career so as to assume his proper place in Canada’s history as its Indigenous (Métis) Father of Confederation.

https://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=130121

 

Louis Riel : firebrand

Louis Riel devoted his life to the Metis cause. A fiery activist, he struggled against injustice as he saw it. He was a pioneer in the field of Aboriginal rights and land claims but was branded an outlaw in his own time. In 1885, he was executed for treason. In 1992, the House of Commons declared Riel a founder of Manitoba. November 16 is now designated Louis Riel Day in Canada.

http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=100518

 

 

Louis Riel : a comic-strip biography

Chester Brown reinvents the comic-book medium to create the critically acclaimed historical biography Louis Riel, winning the Harvey Awards for best writing and best graphic novel for his compelling, meticulous, and dispassionate retelling of the charismatic, and perhaps insane, nineteenth-century Métis leader. Brown coolly documents with dramatic subtlety the violent rebellion on the Canadian prairie led by Riel, who some regard a martyr who died in the name of freedom, while others consider him a treacherous murderer.

http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=87977

 

 

Louis Riel

Champion of a people or traitorous rabble-rouser? Political visionary or religious lunatic? Louis Riel is one of the most ambiguous figures in Canadian history, a man who stood and fell for the Métis nation. Read about the fascinating western icon in this well-paced biography. The doomed struggle of Louis Riel and his Métis people against the new Canadian government is a story rich in drama and cultural change.

https://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=86278

 

 

Riel’s Defence : Perspectives on His Speeches

In 1885, Louis Riel was charged with high treason, found guilty, and consequently executed for his role in Saskatchewan’s North-West Rebellion. During his trial, the Métis leader gave two speeches, passionately defending the interests of the Métis in western Canada as well as his own life. Riel’s Defence studies these speeches, demonstrating the range of Riel’s political and personal concerns.

https://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=123784

 

 

Riel (Video on Demand) (Login Required)

A nostalgic look back at the 1979 Dramatization of the Riel Rebellion of 1885. Under their leader, Louis Riel, the Métis rose up against the government of Sir John A. MacDonald. Stars Raymond Cloutier as Louis Riel. Also includes Roger Blay, Maury Chaykin, Arthur Hill, Leslie Nielsen, Christopher Plummer and William Shatner in supporting roles. (Converted from VHS)

http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=32674

 

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month

February 6, 2019

Black History Month (Graphic by Linda Fox)

February is Black History Month, and you are invited to browse Red River College Library materials that celebrate black Canadians, and their experiences, stories, achievements and contributions.

Books

Viola Desmond's Canada : a history of Blacks and racial segregation in the promised landViola Desmond’s Canada : a history of Blacks and racial segregation in the promised land

In 1946, a Black Halifax businesswoman, Viola Desmond, was wrongfully arrested for sitting in a white’s-only section of a movie theatre in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia. In 2010, sixty-four years later, the Nova Scotia government recognized this gross miscarriage of justice and posthumously granted her a free pardon. Most Canadians are aware of Rosa Parks, the American civil rights icon who refused to give up her seat on a racially segregated bus in Alabama, but Viola Desmond’s similar act of courage in resisting the practice of racial segregation occurred nine years before this historic event. However, today, even after the Nova Scotia Government’s unprecedented pardon of Desmond, many Canadians are still unaware of her story or that racial segregation existed throughout many parts of Canada during most of the twentieth century.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=128252

 

Done with Slavery (eBook)

Did slavery exist in Montreal, and if so what did it look like? Frank Mackey grapples with this question in Done with Slavery, a study of black Montrealers in the eighty years between the British Conquest and the union of Lower and Upper Canada. Through close examination of archival and contemporary sources, Mackey uncovers largely unknown aspects of the black transition from slavery to freedom. While he considers the changing legal status of slavery, much of the book provides a detailed and nuanced reconstruction of the circumstances of black Montrealers and their lived experience. The resulting picture is remarkably complex, showing the variety of occupations held by blacks, the relationships they had with those they served, their encounters with the judicial and political systems, and the racial mingling that came with intermarriage and apprenticeships.

https://login.athena.rrc.mb.ca:2047/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nlebk&AN=404084&site=eds-live

 

Black Canadians : history, experiences, social conditions

For researchers seeking detailed information about the black diaspora in North America, this authoritative reference provides more than 300 years of black Canadian history, from the first migration of slaves, black loyalists, and Civil War refugees to the expansive movement brought about by the establishment of the point system in 1967. Venturing beyond established orthodoxies and simplistic solutions to discuss contentious ethno-racial problems in Canada, this critique addresses housing, the labor market, sports management, and race and ethnic relations. This new edition expands the regional coverage of black history, updates all the statistics with the 2006 census data, and adds important new material on multiculturalism and employment equity.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=111040

 

CBC Curio: Celebrating Black History Month

February is Black History Month in Canada, which provides an opportunity to celebrate the achievements of black Canadians and reflect on the stories, experiences and accomplishments of Canada’s black community. To mark this occasion, Curio.ca has pulled together a selection of resource guides, videos and audio series that honour black history in Canada. (RRC Login is required to view this resource)

Link: CBC Curio: Celebrating Black History Month

 

NFB: The Black Experience in Canada: A Rich History

To celebrate the history of Black Canadians, The National Film Board of Canada (NFB) has selected a group of films that portray the multi-layered lived experience of Canada’s diverse Black communities. The incredible stories of strength, courage and perseverance in the face of adversity that these films present are not often found in mainstream history books. Black communities and cultures have been part of Canadian history from its earliest days, but sadly, their contributions and the lessons they can teach are rarely studied at the elementary or secondary level in schools.  (RRC Login is required to view this resource)

Link: The Black Experience in Canada: A Rich History

 

The Teaching Professor

January 2, 2019

The Library has purchased a subscription to the online journal The Teaching Professor.

The Teaching Professor was founded in 1987 with a simple goal in mind: Create a newsletter that helps college faculty improve their teaching, share best practices, and stay current on the latest pedagogical research.

Since that time, The Teaching Professor has become a trusted guide for tens of thousands of educators who are committed to creating a better learning environment. The new Teaching Professor, launched August 2018, reflects the changing needs of today’s college faculty and the students they teach. This new fully online version includes everything readers have loved about The Teaching Professor for so many years—great articles and practical, evidence-based insights—but it also contains many new features and formats that will make it an even more indispensable resource.

Each week readers can expect thought-provoking and actionable advice on a wealth of critical topics, including:

  • Improving student learning
  • Designing effective activities and assignments
  • Energizing and re-inspiring yourself in mid-career
  • Promoting academic integrity
  • Responding to course evaluations and feedback
  • Dealing with difficult students
  • Getting students to read what’s assigned

Reference: https://www-teachingprofessor-com.athena.rrc.mb.ca:2047/

You may find a link to the The Teaching Professor in the Library’s A-Z Database page at library.rrc.ca.

Posted by Mark Nelson – RRC Library

Award-Winning Animation, Documentaries and Films

December 14, 2018

Whether you are in a contemplative mood or looking for fun, holidays are a wonderful time to sit back and enjoy great video. These featured award-winners are available to Red River College staff and students “on demand”… ready when you are, on whatever device you choose (RRC username and password required).

For more information on our streaming video collection, visit our Streaming Video guide.

Animation

The National Film Board (NFB) has a global reputation for their award-winning animation, a few of which are shown below. Want to see more? Visit the animation section of the NFB website.

Bob's Birthday Cover Art

Special Delivery cover art

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bob’s Birthday

This film took home an Oscar® for Best Animated Short Film. A witty, offbeat animated portrait of a frustrated dentist wrestling with the fundamental issues of life proves that birthdays (and surprise parties) can be very tricky indeed.

The Cat Came Back

Hilarious Oscar®-nominated animation based on the century-old folk song of the same name. Old Mr. Johnson makes increasingly manic attempts to rid himself of a little yellow cat that just won’t stay away… Also won the 1989 Genie Award for best animated short film.

The Danish Poet

This Oscar®-winning short animation follows Kasper, a poet whose creative well has run dry, on a holiday to Norway to meet the famous writer Sigrid Undset.

Special Delivery

In this Oscar®-winning animated short, Ralph’s day gets off to a bad start when he dismisses his wife’s orders to clear the snow from the front walk. When he comes home and finds the mailman dead on his front stairs, Ralph attempts a massive cover-up with disastrous results.

Documentaries

Documentaries are a great way to open up your mind to new ideas. The following award-winners are so effective that instructors have incorporated them into their teaching plans.

Alive Inside cover artChina Rises cover artGriefwalker cover art

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alive Inside 

A joyous cinematic exploration of music’s capacity to reawaken our souls and uncover the deepest parts of our humanity. (Winner of multiple awards)

China Rises

A four-part groundbreaking documentary special that takes you inside modern China like no other program has ever done. The series is a vibrant portrait of an ascending power.

Griefwalker

Portrayal of palliative caregiver Stephen Jenkinson. This film shows Tim Wilson’s dealing with his denial of his own death where he almost succumbed to an illness, and coping with the near death of someone close to him. Jenkinson explains something that is uncomfortable for most Westerners to hear, that death and grief are woven into the fabric of life and that death is something to be ‘befriended’.

Invisible City 

A moving story of two boys from Regent Park crossing into adulthood – their mothers and mentors rooting for them to succeed; their environment and social pressures tempting them to make poor choices. (Winner of the Best Canadian Feature at 2009 Hot Docs)

Films

Ready to be captured by a great story? In case you have little ones at home, the first two listed here are suitable for family viewing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beasts of the Southern Wild

Hushpuppy is a six-year-old living in an isolated bayou community. When her father Wink becomes ill, she sets off for the outside world in an attempt to help him. The journey to save her father is delayed by a ‘busted’ universe that reverses weather patterns and brings about long-extinct animals. Can Hushpuppy save the day? (Recipient of multiple awards and nominations, including four Academy Award nominations)

The Lion King

A lion cub crown prince is tricked by a treacherous uncle into thinking he caused his father’s death and flees into exile in despair, only to learn in adulthood his identity and his responsibilities. Winner of two Oscars®.

Once Were Warriors

A family descended from Maori warriors is bedeviled by a violent father and the societal problems of being treated as outcasts. Based on the novel by Alan Duff. (Winner of multiple awards)

Sex Traffic

This award-winning drama weaves the lives of four people, culminating in a disturbing look at the trafficking of sex slaves in Eastern Europe and beyond. Contains sensitive images and language. (Winner of 8 BAFTA awards)

Comments or Questions?

If you have any comments or questions about video resources at RRC Library, or you are an instructor and would like to recommend a purchase, please email us at AV@rrc.ca, call at 204-632-2231, or visit us in person in the Library.

Posted by Linda Fox — RRC Library

Holiday Reading – Award Winning Books

December 7, 2018

It’s always nice to relax at this time of the year, and there’s no better way to relax than to dive into a good book. During the upcoming holidays, why not take some time for yourself and read one of the many award winning books that are available in the Red River College Library.

To view a selection of award winning books, come visit the Library Window Display at the Notre Dame Campus. You may also view a complete list of all books in our display. If you see something you like, just ask at our Circualtion desk.

Here is a small sample of some of the excellent titles:

Jonny Appleseed : a novel / Joshua Whitehead

Off the reserve and trying to find ways to live and love in the big city, Jonny Appleseed, a young Two-Spirit/Indigiqueer, becomes a cybersex worker who fetishizes himself in order to make a living. Jonny’s world is a series of breakages, appendages, and linkages – and as he goes through the motions of preparing to return home for his step-father’s funeral, he learns how to put together the pieces of his life. Jonny Appleseed is a unique, shattering vision of Indigenous life, full of grit, glitter, and dreams.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=132461

 

Marrow thieves / Cherie Dimaline

In a future world ravaged by global warming, people have lost the ability to dream, and the dreamlessness has led to widespread madness. The only people still able to dream are North America’s indigenous population – and it is their marrow that holds the cure for the rest of the world. But getting the marrow – and dreams – means death for the unwilling donors. Driven to flight, a 15-year-old and his companions struggle for survival, attempt to reunite with loved ones, and take refuge from the “recruiters” who seek them out to bring them to the marrow-stealing ‘factories.’

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=130399

 

Minds of winter / Ed O’Loughlin

Fay Morgan and Nelson Nilsson have each arrived in Inuvik, Canada — 120 miles north of the Arctic Circle — searching for answers about a family member: Nelson for his estranged older brother, Fay for her disappeared grandfather. They soon learn that these two men have an unexpected link — a hidden share in one of the greatest enduring mysteries of polar exploration. This is the riddle of the ‘Arnold 294’ chronometer, which reappeared in Britain over a hundred years after it was recorded as lost in the Arctic with the ships and men of Sir John Franklin’s Northwest Passage expedition. The secret history of this elusive timepiece, Fay and Nelson will discover, ties them and their families to a journey that echoes across two centuries.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=130481

 

Son of a trickster / Eden Robinson

Everyone knows a guy like Jared: the burnout kid in high school who sells weed cookies and has a scary mom who’s often wasted and wielding some kind of weapon. Jared does smoke and drink too much, and he does make the best cookies in town, and his mom is a mess, but he’s also a kid who has an immense capacity for compassion and an impulse to watch over people more than twice his age, and he can’t rely on anyone for consistent love and support, except for his flatulent pit bull, Baby Killer (he calls her Baby)–and now she’s dead. Jared can’t count on his mom to stay sober and stick around to take care of him. He can’t rely on his dad to pay the bills and support his new wife and step-daughter. Jared is only sixteen but feels like he is the one who must stabilize his family’s life, even look out for his elderly neighbours. But he struggles to keep everything afloat … and sometimes he blacks out. And he puzzles over why his maternal grandmother has never liked him, why she says he’s the son of a trickster, that he isn’t human. Mind you, ravens speak to him–even when he’s not stoned. You think you know Jared, but you don’t.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=130547

 

Hot milk / Deborah Levy

I have been sleuthing my mother’s symptoms for as long as I can remember. If I see myself as an unwilling detective with a desire for justice, is her illness an unsolved crime? If so, who is the villain and who is the victim? Sofia, a young anthropologist, has spent much of her life trying to solve the mystery of her mother’s unexplainable illness. She is frustrated with Rose and her constant complaints, but utterly relieved to be called to abandon her own disappointing fledgling adult life. She and her mother travel to the searing, arid coast of southern Spain to see a famous consultant– their very last chance– in the hope that he might cure her unpredictable limb paralysis. But Dr. Gomez has strange methods that seem to have little to do with physical medicine, and as the treatment progresses, Sofia’s mother’s illness becomes increasingly baffling. Sophia’s role as detective– tracking her mother’s symptoms in an attempt to find the secret motivation for her pain– deepens as she discovers her own desires in this transient desert community. Hot Milk is a profound exploration of the sting of sexuality, of unspoken female rage, of myth and modernity, the lure of hypochondria and big pharma, and, above all, the value of experimenting with life; of being curious, bewildered, and vitally alive to the world.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=128498

 

All that man is / David Szalay

Nine men. Each of them at a different stage in life, each of them away from home, and each of them striving–in the suburbs of Prague, in an overdeveloped Alpine village, beside a Belgian motorway, in a dingy Cyprus hotel–to understand what it means to be alive, here and now. Tracing a dramatic arc from the spring of youth to the winter of old age, the ostensibly separate narratives of All That Man Is aggregate into a picture of a single shared existence, a picture that interrogates the state of modern manhood while bringing to life, unforgettably, the physical and emotional terrain of an increasingly globalized Europe. And so these nine lives form an ingenious and new kind of novel, in which David Szalay expertly plots a dark predicament for the twenty-first-century man.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=128518

 

Posted by Mark Nelson – RRC Library

Cannabis Awareness: Videos Worth Watching

October 17, 2018

Photo credit: pixabay.com

Many Canadians are celebrating today as licensed cannabis stores across Canada open their doors to the public. Recreational cannabis use is now legal, but not without restrictions and potential danger to those who misuse it. Perhaps more than ever we need cannabis awareness – not only of the laws surrounding it, but also the health effects and risks it presents.

The Legalities

The following links provide legal information about the use of cannabis:

The Risks: Watch and Learn

The Cannabis Awareness Video Collection – now on display at AV Services, NDC Library – will open your eyes with scientific facts and personal stories related to cannabis use. All staff and students at the College have access to the video collection. Please contact us if you have any questions.

View the list of videos here >> Cannabis Awareness Video Collection

Questions or comments? We’d Love to Hear From You!

Library – CM35
Notre Dame Campus
204-632-2231

Library – P214
Exchange District Campus
204-949-8370

–Posted by Linda Fox