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World Water Day 2019

March 8, 2019

Every year on March 22nd we celebrate World Water Day, this year’s theme is No One Left Behind. The UN has created a list of Sustainable Development goals to have completed by 2030, and safe drinking water for all is number 6.

Books and eBooks

To celebrate, we’ve picked a few titles that remind us of the importance of water. Check out our offerings below, or view many of these titles in our Notre Dame Campus Library window display.

Bottled & Sold

Bottled and Sold shows how water went from being a free natural resource to one of the most successful commercial products of the last one hundred years-and why we are poorer for it. It’s a big story and water is big business. Every second of every day in the United States, a thousand people buy a plastic bottle of water, and every second of every day a thousand more throw one of those bottles away. “Designer” H2O may be laughable, but the debate over commodifying water is deadly serious. It comes down to society’s choices about human rights, the role of government and free markets, the importance of being “green,” and fundamental values. Gleick gets to the heart of the bottled water craze, exploring what it means for us to bottle and sell our most basic necessity.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=114969

Eau Canada : the future of Canada‘s water

As the sustainability of our natural resources is increasingly questioned, Canadians remain stubbornly convinced of the unassailability of our water. Mounting evidence suggests, however, that Canadian water is under threat. Eau Canada assembles the country’s top water experts to discuss our most pressing water issues. Perspectives from a broad range of thinkers – geographers, environmental lawyers, former government officials, aquatic and political scientists, and economists – reflect the diversity of concerns in water management.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=99380

 

The World Is Blue: How Our Fate and the Oceans are One

This book tie-in to National Geographic’s ambitious 5-year ocean initiative—focusing on overfishing—is written in National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Sylvia Earle’s accessible yet hard-hitting voice. Through compelling personal stories she puts the current and future peril of the ocean and the life it supports in perspective for a wide public audience.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=110974

Replenish

Sandra Postel takes readers around the world to explore water projects that work with, rather than against, nature’s rhythms. In New Mexico, forest rehabilitation is safeguarding drinking water; along the Mississippi River, farmers are planting cover crops to reduce polluted runoff; and in China, “sponge cities” are capturing rainwater to curb urban flooding. Efforts like these will be essential as climate change disrupts both weather patterns and the models on which we base our infrastructure. We will be forced to adapt. The question is whether we will continue to fight the water cycle or recognize our place in it and take advantage of the inherent services nature offers. Water, Postel writes, is a gift, the source of life itself. How will we use this greatest of gifts?

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=130707

Water 4.0

To make informed decisions about the future, we need to understand the three revolutions in urban water systems that have occurred over the past 2,500 years and the technologies that will remake the system. The author starts by describing Water 1.0, the early Roman aqueducts, fountains, and sewers that made dense urban living feasible.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=122969

 

 

 

Seasick : ocean change and the extinction of life on Earth

In Seasick, veteran science journalist Alanna Mitchell dives beneath the surface of the world’s oceans to give readers a sense of how this watery realm can be managed and preserved, and with it life on earth. Each chapter features a different group of researchers, who introduce readers to the importance of ocean currents, the building of coral structures, or the effects of acidification.

http://icarus.rrc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=109960

 

Water Is Life : Women’s Human Rights in National and Local Water Governance in Southern and Eastern Africa [E-Book]

This book approached water and sanitation as an African gender and human rights issue. Empirical case studies from Kenya, Malawi, South Africa and Zimbabwe show how coexisting international, national and local regulations of water and sanitation respond to the ways in which different groups of rural and urban women gain access to water for personal, domestic and livelihood purposes.

https://login.athena.rrc.mb.ca:2047/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nlebk&AN=1097815&site=eds-live

Dirty Water : One Man’s Fight to Clean Up One of the World’s Most Polluted Bays [E-Book]

Dirty Water is the riveting story of how Howard Bennett, a Los Angeles schoolteacher with a gift for outrageous rhetoric, fought pollution in Santa Monica Bay–and won.This is the fast-paced story of how this unusual cast of characters created an environmental movement in Los Angeles that continues to this day with the nationally recognized Heal the Bay. Character-driven, compelling, and uplifting, Dirty Water tells how even the most polluted water can be cleaned up-by ordinary people.

https://login.athena.rrc.mb.ca:2047/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nlebk&AN=305999&site=eds-live