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Freedom to Read Week

February 25, 2014

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Freedom to Read Week is an annual event that encourages Canadians to think about and reaffirm their commitment to intellectual freedom, which is guaranteed them under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. This year it is from February 23-March 1, 2014.

Reference: http://www.freedomtoread.ca/

Censorship in Canada

Freedom to read can never be taken for granted. Even in Canada, a free country by world standards, books and magazines are banned at the border. Schools and libraries are regularly asked to remove books and magazines from their shelves. Free expression on the Internet is under attack. Few of these stories make headlines, but they affect the right of Canadians to decide for themselves what they choose to read.

Would you like to see a list of the works that have been challenged in Canada
http://www.freedomtoread.ca/challenged-works/

Freedom to Read Week Video

This inspiring Freedom to Read Week video was made by Julia and Danika from the Calgary Science School, who won the Calgary Public Library Teen Freedom to Read Week Video contest.

Items in our Collection

You too can learn more about censorship by searching our library catalogue.  Here are a few items that the Red River College Library currently has in it’s collection:

120 banned books : censorship histories of world literature
Throughout history, nations, peoples, and governments have censored writers and their works on political, religious, sexual, and social grounds. Although the literary merit of the majority of these books has been proven time and time again, efforts are still in place today to suppress some of them. From Animal Farm to Ulysses, this book examines the struggle 120 of these works faced to be read.
Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=95189

Dear sir, I intend to burn your book : an anatomy of a book burning
In 2011, Canadian writer Lawrence Hill received an email from a man in the Netherlands stating that he intended to burn The Book of Negroes, Hill’s internationally acclaimed novel. Soon, the threat was international news, affecting Hill’s publishers and readers. In this provocative essay, Hill shares his private response to that moment and the controversy that followed, examing his reaction to the threat, while attempting to come to terms with the book burner’s motives and complaints.
Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=121454

forbiddenfruitForbidden fruit : banned, censored, and challenged books from Dante to Harry Potter
From the New Testament to The Diary of Anne Frank to current objections to the Harry Potter series–dubbed the most frequently challenged books of the 21st century by the American Library Association–the tradition of banning, censoring, and challenging books has been remarkably enduring.
Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=112230

Literature suppressed on political grounds
Throughout history, tyrants, totalitarian states, religious institutions, and democratic governments alike have banned books thought to challenge their beliefs or question their activities. This book profiles the censorship of works banned because they were perceived as threats to governmental security or challenges to widely held political values, or simply because they presented truths embarassing to authorities.
Link: http://icarus.rrc.mb.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=99785

Freedom To Read Week Display

At our downtown campus, at the John and Bonnie Buhler Library in the Roblin Centre, there is a Freedom to Read Week display, which includes many more related items from our collection.