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What is Relational Nursing? Joe’s Story Part 3

May 24, 2012

Relational nursing involves a process of inquiry. We have already seen how the nurse inquires about Joe’s and his family’s experience. Other areas of inquiry that Suzette will consider are empirical knowledge – what are the current best practices for management of diabetes? What does she need to know in order to competently manage Joe’s physical health needs? She thinks about ethics – what is the right or moral thing to do when there is pressure to discharge Joe before everything is ready for follow-up in the community? She also examines her own experiences, beliefs, values and ideology – for instance, has she allowed her ideas about “compliance” to affect the way she has responded to Joe? Self-observation is key to being able to consciously choose the best actions in a particular situation.

So what has this meant for Joe and his family? Joe’s physical health needs have been competently cared for, and they have felt respected and listened to. They trust Suzette and are willing to hear the recommendations she has for them. Safety has been maintained, and Joe’s concerns have been attended to.  Joe feels empowered to manage his health better, and his family feels ready to support him.

What is Relational Nursing? Joe’s Story part 2

May 14, 2012

We are exploring the story of Joe, whose nurse Suzette practices relational nursing. In relational nursing practice, nurses look for “how people, situations, contexts, environments and processes are integrally connecting and shaping each other” (Doane & Varcoe, 2005). So Suzette inquires about the connections and influences that shape Joe’s health and illness experience. She notes that he is from an ethnic minority group, lives in a poor neighbourhood, and is on disability leave from his job. He has a large extended family who visits him frequently. Joe’s wife and family are experiencing his illness as very frightening and overwhelming. Suzette offers the family support and resources.

Joe states that he hasn’t gone to his doctor because he feels discriminated against at the clinic. Suzette considers how this has hampered his illness management, and supports Joe and his family in thinking of ways to address this concern. Cultural safety is an important part of relational practice, and means going beyond cultural awareness or sensitivity, to actively promote respectful and supportive practices and systems.

Stay tuned for Part 3 of Joe’s story!

Reference: Doane, G.H. & Varcoe, C. (2005) Family nursing as relational practice. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Nursing Week Events Photos

May 11, 2012

Thanks to everyone who attended the displays of National Nursing week in the Library Hallway. The event proved to be a sampling of what the nursing life is like at Red River College including a look at some of the skills of nurses, the job roles, and the program development of the RRC Baccalaureate Nursing Program. Special thanks to Instructor Tracey Wozney for spearheading the organization of the day and to the many student and staff volunteers who answered questions from our guests and participants. Please enjoy a sampling of photos from the event.

 

National Nurses Week Events on Now at Notre Dame Campus

May 7, 2012

Nursing Week Event May 7th and 8th
Come by the Library hallway from 11 am to 1 pm on May 7th and 8th
as we kick start the beginning of National Nursing Week.

There will be a variety of booths, information, and displays reflecting the positive impacts nurses make on the lives and well being of Canadians.

Please stop by to see what it is nursing faculty and nursing students do in the preparation of knowledgeable, competent and caring health professionals and their contributions to society as learned, innovative and thinking citizens.

There will also be pizza and pop for sale.

Cancerous Lung in Action

Nursing Week Celebration

April 23, 2012

“Nursing the Health of Our Nation”
“It all begins with a strong, educational foundation”
Come by the Library hallway from
1100 to 1300 May 7th and 8th
as we kick start the beginning of

National Nursing Week.

There will be a variety of booths, information, and displays reflecting the positive impacts nurses make on the lives and well-being of Canadians.

Please stop by to see what it is nursing faculty and nursing students do in the preparation of knowledgeable, competent and caring health professionals and their contributions to society as learned, innovative and thinking citizens.

What is Relational Nursing? Joe’s story (part 1 of 3)

April 23, 2012

Our new curriculum is founded on the relational approach. But what exactly is this?

Joe, age 55, has Type 1 diabetes and is in hospital after having suffered an insulin coma. His primary nurse, Suzette, practices relational nursing. What will this mean for Joe?

Suzette begins by seeking to learn about Joe – not only his medical condition, but also who he is as a unique person, what concerns him most, and what this hospitalization means for him. In relational practice, the nurse seeks to know who the particular person/family is in this particular situation at this moment in time, and what is meaningful to them.

Suzette is authentic and responsive in her interactions with Joe, and takes initiative to make a connection with him. This means that whenever she is in the room to do a nursing task, she is at the same time interacting with Joe to get to know him, what he is experiencing, and what he needs. She invites Joe and his family to be partners in Joe’s recovery by providing information and support. She also collaborates with the interdisciplinary health team. Partnership is the heart of relational practice.

Nursing Says Farewell to the JBN and DNA Nursing Programs

March 20, 2012

On behalf of Karen Wall, Chair of Nursing, and the Red River College Nursing faculty, we would like to announce and celebrate the enormous success of two very important programs in Red River College Nursing history.

The Red River College/University of Manitoba Joint Baccalaureate Nursing Program (JBN) was established in 1996 and in the same year all diploma nursing programs in the province of Manitoba were closed.  The students completed their first 3 years of education at Red River College followed by their final year at the University of Manitoba.  The JBN Program remains the only joint degree program in Canada that was a 3 + 1 model.  The first entry of 20 students graduated from the University of Manitoba in 2000. In its final years the student intake for the JBN Program was 108 students. The collegial working relationship between the RRC Nursing Department and the University of Manitoba Faculty of Nursing resulted in an excellent joint program that ran successfully for 16 years.

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